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Martee

OK, so who uses FreeBSD?

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Now that this is a Unix forum, I guess this isn''t too offtopic I''m curious as to how many people out there develop under FreeBSD. Anyone?

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Martee, this isn''t in the least bit offtopic

I''ve never had the opportunity to use FreeBSD, but I plan to be doing some significant OS research in the near future as I start messing around with homebrew embedded devices... I''ll be sure to post both my findings and musings here.

[ GDNet Start Here | GDNet FAQ | MS RTFM | STL | Google ]
Thanks to Kylotan for the idea!

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I''ve used it from time to time at a few jobs.

It''s just another BSD based *nix. BSD''s have a reputation for tight programming though and security.

R.

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Nope, never tried it. I''d like to give it a shot here pretty soon though when I start messing around with an old Pentium 133 I have. I''d like to make it into a fileserver or something, and I may get BSD on it to try it out.

rm -rf /bin/laden

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Guest Anonymous Poster
FreeBSD!!! Probably my favorite of the free unix-like environments. Mainly because of its networking abilities.

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Hi,

Well the installing was a little weird in the beginning but I love freebsd now. Although it doesn''t have the huge support and packages which linux has, on the whole it seens to be a sturdy OS.

Well given a choice of freebsd or linux, I would rather go with freebsd but of course it also depends on the nature of use.

I am glad I can say I use freebsd & linux for development :-)

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I would recommend FreeBSD for network infrastructure, and Linux for applications. Since applications are more likely to require customized configurations and respond to a wider variety of situations (network protocols don''t permit much discrepancy), this works perfectly - even in tandem.

On a related note, where do you all see the various *nixes developing most? I think the desktop computing paradigm, while still very popular and strong, has its days numbered and the unices - particularly Linux - will see an explosion in use as we shift to "invisible computing" (voice recognition, text-to-speech, natural language synthesis, distributed computing, etc).

Opinions?

[ GDNet Start Here | GDNet FAQ | MS RTFM | STL | Google ]
Thanks to Kylotan for the idea!

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quote:
Original post by flame_warrior
Although it doesn''t have the huge support and packages which linux has, on the whole it seens to be a sturdy OS.

That''s the only reason I haven''t given it (any BSD, that is) a try yet. If I ever set up a server box I''ll be able to give one of them a try since it won''t be needed for desktop-like usage.

[Resist Windows XP''s Invasive Production Activation Technology!]

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I am LEARING FreeBSD.. OpenBSD is prety cool, but FreeBSD''s site has iso''s to download and burn so you don''t have to install from ftp.. can you remember ftp.mirrors3.someplace.net/pub/....? I can''t.

Since *NIX has came a cool open developer''s choice,I''m looking into it.

The "Free" FreeBSD Handbook comes in handy, but it''s over 510 pages of text!


BTW if anyone knows how to build a NAT router.. please help me out =)
I cannot find the kernel options file.

THANKS!

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Actually, I think the desktop paradigm is going to continue to grow. This is simply because as the number of people who want an alternative to Windows grows, and as the desktop environments for *nix continue to improve, more people (and businesses especially) will make the switch.

rm -rf /bin/laden

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Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by GoofProg
BTW if anyone knows how to build a NAT router.. please help me out =)
I cannot find the kernel options file.

THANKS!




http://www.muine.org/~hoang/freenat.html

Being an OpenBSD maniac myself, I''d say this is easier to do with OBSD.

I develop on FreeBSD (and OpenBSD and Linux) but not games. Anyway, since I''m posting this anonymously as always, it doesn''t really matter.

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quote:
Original post by CmndrM
Actually, I think the desktop paradigm is going to continue to grow. This is simply because as the number of people who want an alternative to Windows grows, and as the desktop environments for *nix continue to improve, more people (and businesses especially) will make the switch.

In the short run.

In the long run, however, the desktop is really just an inferior paradigm. For document creation and editing, wouldn''t dictation and direction of an intelligent agent be better?

"Given the propensity of users to seek forms of entertainment that can be consumed in intermittent doses and doesn''t require intense commitment... Wait, make that ''doesn''t require garden-like tending''... Resume. ...we therefore consider the persistent world model to be a niche market - at least in the interim."

Beats typing if you can say it, kinda like you would instruct a stenographer or secretary.

"Okay, show me what I have so far... Bring up the figures I collated last week... No, the other ones, the ones based on the correlation between purchases and time online.. Yeah, those. Alright, place table three on page 6... Nah, a little lower..."

If we have visual feedback, intelligent autonomous agents, voice recognition in noisy environments and all the other technologies necessary to make this a reality, then the desktop paradigm might die as there is no reason to be seated behind a desk wielding the cumbersome devices called "keyboard" and "mouse."

In fact, if there are no layout issues there wont be a need for the visual interface in the particular instance above. Say you were sending an email to Ma - a "Read it back to me" is all that would be necessary.

How about little embedded devices that keep track of what groceries you need: as you take the milk out of the fridge and don''t put it back, it gets added to your groceries list; how about telling your TiVo/VCR to record a show whenever it comes on rather than programming it to times. With a little content classification at the station''s end, your home entertainment set could know the neame of all shows currently on and stream one or more of them to storage according to your previous dictates.

So many of the things we''re accustomed to doing within the parameters of today''s interface may be revolutionized - and I see open technologies like Linux at the forefront of that revolution. Small, customizable to fit diverse situations, robust.

Ideal.

[ GDNet Start Here | GDNet FAQ | MS RTFM | STL | Google ]
Thanks to Kylotan for the idea!

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I do not think that your vision will come true in the near future and perhaps do I not want it..
Just give me a better desktop with better tools. I do not need a computer that controls how much milk I am drinking and TV habits.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Hello?!?!

Don''t YOU type faster than you speak? I sure do...
Okay if you came up with a-not-so-cumbersome device that''d would interact directly with your brain or nerves, then I''d buy the idea. Something that''d even make us more efficient since we wouldn''t have the delays of first sending a nerve signal and then actually perform the action.

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Hey I use/love FreeBSD.

Some many months ago now, I finally got fed up with MS Windows, and I choose FreeBSD to be my primary OS. I''ve never looked back.
I think the day I installed FreeBSD was one of the greatest days in my life....wait I have no life, I love an OS

Anyways, I''m teaching myself SDL and OpenGL under FreeBSD aimed at game development. Hopefully, my FreeBSD will soon be the family gateway until I get another machine to use...

The FreeBSD handbook is great, it may seem big, but you only read the first "Getting started" type chapters then you read whatever else when you need it.

I think FreeBSD is really making a place for itself in the desktop market too. I do admit the only con I have with FreeBSD is games. All the latest flashy games are either MS ot Mac. Some of them are for Linux, but it aint easy to run Linux binaries when I don''t half the million libraries they require...more of reason to make my own games I guess

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Does freebsd or any other *bsd have a package system like apt? And what desktop enviroment dose freebsd and others use (the same ones that linux uses?)?? Just wondering.


It is foolish for a wise man to be silent, but wise for a fool.

Matthew
WebMaster
www.Matt-Land.com

All your Xbox base are belong to Nintendo.

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quote:






"Given the propensity of users to seek forms of entertainment that can be consumed in intermittent doses and doesn''t require intense commitment... Wait, make that ''doesn''t require garden-like tending''... Resume. ...we therefore consider the persistent world model to be a niche market - at least in the interim."

Beats typing if you can say it, kinda like you would instruct a stenographer or secretary.



I think it would be fun to write code :
"int main takes int argc and char star argv. begin statement block. int i, semicolon. int j equals 23. ..." .. although, it may be easier by hand

Seriously, though, I think that the whole Internet Appliance idea is where we''re going. Not necessarily an "Internet" appliance, but at least a home network one. Like a little screen that''s built into a desk where you can read your e-book, or when you prefer, watch TV. And (of course) it seems that the most straightforward way to do that would be to have all of your little screens be Xterms. It''d also help the age-old family problem of "Mom! Dad! Joey''s on the computer and I want to use it!!"

... or maybe that''s just *my* house

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Nice to see so many replies!
quote:
I''ve never had the opportunity to use FreeBSD, but I plan to be doing some significant OS research in the near future as I start messing around with homebrew embedded devices

Cool! If you don''t mind me asking, what sort of deices are you thinking of?
quote:
Although it doesn''t have the huge support and packages which linux has, on the whole it seens to be a sturdy OS.

That''s it''s biggest downside, IMHO.
quote:
Does freebsd or any other *bsd have a package system like apt?

It has a pretty good packaging system. For example, you can run ''pkg_add -r someCoolPackage-1.0.tgz'', and it will automatically download and install the package.
quote:
And what desktop enviroment dose freebsd and others use (the same ones that linux uses?)??

KDE, Gnome, whatever. Most Linux desktop environments are available for FreeBSD.
quote:
I think it would be fun to write code :
"int main takes int argc and char star argv. begin statement block. int i, semicolon. int j equals 23. ..." .. although, it may be easier by hand

Of course, by the time this comes about, our programming paradigms and languages will have changed so that coding by voice is faster than coding by hand

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quote:
Original post by Obelix
Just give me a better desktop with better tools. I do not need a computer that controls how much milk I am drinking and TV habits.

You may not, but the general populace may. And that''s the point - moving away from scratching merely developers'' itches and catering to the needs of casual users; that is what is necessary to make Linux a mainstream commodity, a staple feature in business and entertainment. You can''t deny that such systems would find widespread use...

quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Don''t YOU type faster than you speak? I sure do...

Not always. The average person speaks ~200 wpm; the average typist 35-45. An exceptional typist only averages about 60. You do the math.

Add the fact that you don''t have to backspace...

The desktop is unlikely to die entirely; there will probably still be situations in which keyboards, mice and desktops will remain the primary and only means of computing.

quote:
Original post by kendallemm
I think it would be fun to write code :
"int main takes int argc and char star argv. begin statement block. int i, semicolon. int j equals 23. ..." .. although, it may be easier by hand

As Martee said, the programming paradigms are likely to have evolved as well: "compilers" will be able to generate all the entry, exit and scaffolding code.

But we agree on the networked applicance idea.

[ GDNet Start Here | GDNet FAQ | MS RTFM | STL | Google ]
Thanks to Kylotan for the idea!

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I suppose the AP message was a reply to my post but I did not mentioned speech recognition. Perhaps will it be widely used and perhaps not. Not everything that looks promising will also work great.
"Hello?!?!" the earth is calling is my comment about the direct interaction between the computer and the brain.

Perhaps can the linux kernel be used in embedded devices and it is cool but for me is that not the real thing. I think that if linux does not has so many users it deserves is it because many think of it as some kind "elite" system. If the image changed to more cool&fun would also more people want to use it.

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quote:
The average person speaks ~200 wpm; the average typist 35-45. An exceptional typist only averages about 60. You do the math.


Actually, an average person speaks around 150wpm in the midwest, in the northeast it might be 200wpm, in the south it would probably be closer to around 120. I only know one person who types 150wpm and listening to him type is like listening to a drum roll (around 14 keystrokes per second, including the space bar). I''m a good typist at around 60-65 wpm. In many businesses that I''ve done consulting for, their general office workers (secretarys, accountants) usually type around 90wpm. The only time that dictation is good is for word processors, which only actual management really needs. Secretaries and accountants make more use of applications that require tabs and menus (ever used Macola?).

Yes, dictating would be good, but it''s not practical for business uses. That''s why your programs like Dragon Dictate aren''t all that successful. Most importantly, you don''t want everyone around to hear what you''re dictating to the computer (usually sensitive material, possibly human resources stuff which you definitely don''t want whoever''s walking by to hear you dictating). For home uses, it might be useful, but most of the work that I do at home dictation would still be useless for.

Anyway, back to the topic...

I am starting a project that will begin using FreeBSD during development, but eventually switching over to full BSD with an Oracle database. We would stick with FreeBSD, but we will need more power than it can really provide. It will be a client/server thing, with the client running on M$ OSs.

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quote:
Original post by Martee
quote Oluseyi: I''ve never had the opportunity to use FreeBSD, but I plan to be doing some significant OS research in the near future as I start messing around with homebrew embedded devices
--------------------------------
Cool! If you don''t mind me asking, what sort of deices are you thinking of?

Sorry, been meaning to respond to this but hadn''t got round to it...

I''m planning to start fooling with transmissive communication devices, starting short range limited spectrum and then expanding outwards. The eventual objective is to implement a unified transceiver for telephony, IP and TV/radio. It will require separate receptors for TV and radio, but the telephony/internet transceiver could be rolled into one as it''s just a question of sorting packets. Embedding Linux into this device would allow for some processing to be offloaded from client devices.

I''m toying with the idea of a packet-based national telephone network. I know that the US network is rather developed (though showing age and design limitations), but the inertia is too great (telephone networks here will migrate/evolve rather than "switch"). However, in developing countries where there is a lot less infrastructure in place, switching to packet-based telephony would allow them to catch up with the developed world and would be cost-effective for them. It would also link remote spots that are generally inaccessible due to lack of roads and difficult terrain. Being packet-based, it would reduce the need for dedicated connections as well as power consumption ("only send when there''s data" can cut transmission by up to 30%), making it possible to run compact systems off of solar cells. My intended test country would be Nigeria (I''m a US/Nigerian dual citizen).

And that''s just one of them (devices).

[ GDNet Start Here | GDNet FAQ | MS RTFM | STL | Google ]
Thanks to Kylotan for the idea!

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In answer to the original question... I use FreeBSD a lot. I maintain a bunch of FreeBSD-based firewalls for various clients, a FreeBSD-based mail server (5,000 clients on it and it barely breaks a sweat), FreeBSD-based database servers (PostgreSQL and MySQL), and I keep a FreeBSD desktop machine next to my WinXP work machine for development purposes. I wouldn''t entirely recommend it for regular desktop use (although I''d take it over Linux any day of the week because of the ports collection and logical layout), but for server work its pretty hard to beat.

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quote:
Although it doesn''t have the huge support and packages which linux has, on the whole it seens to be a sturdy OS.


what about ports?!
it tends to work a lot better than the horrible apt-get that seems to break itself all the time (not just my experience, but maybe I should just stop trying to do everything by hand)

/Mikael Jacobson

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