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Vlarr

Poll: MUDS

12 posts in this topic

Hi Everyone, I''m conducting a poll and am very interested in what you all think of this subject. The topic is MUDs and I just have a few questions that I''d like your opinions on. For the most part (at least from my experience) MUDs are usually free to play without charge. There are a few exceptions such as GemStone and perhaps a few others that I can''t quite think off the top of my head. My first question is: Would any of you actually pay a monthly subscription to play a MUD? If so, what would it take? What I mean is, what qualities would it have to encompass in order to pledge that kind of dedication? Thirdly, and I guess this ties in closely with the first two questions, in the vast market of beautiful (and even sometimes emersive) 3D games do you think MUDs hold a place in there somewhere? Or do you think MUDs are destined to become merely a shadow of the past? Lastly, what do you like about them and what do you dislike of them? Thanks in advance for taking the time to respond. ~Vlarr Vlarr@hotmail.com ICQ # 50607306
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I love muds, but I wouldn''t ever consider paying for one. I have been playing a mud now for just about 3 years, and I haven''t yet become sick of it. I don''t think muds will ever be completely forgoten.

LostSoul
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MUD: Multi-User Dungeon, one of a family of multi user text games (MUSH, MUX, etc..)

Text-based online multiplayer games, they have been around since the dawn of the internet. Extremely addictive, the reason thousands of college kids fail out :->

I actually played in a MUSH (Elendor, tolkien themed and quite successful) for 5 or 6 years (still pop in to visit with old friends from time to time..)



Notwen
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MUDs are dead to everyone except current addicts. I can''t see why anyone would play one now. Their time has passed.
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I belive MUD will have to master new technologies to become popular again.

MUD has not changed for years...it is time for a good face lift! The MUD idea is good (and time prove-it) but if no one make them evolve...they will fade out!

Macking a new MUD game with new technologies is a good game idea ;-)

Im sure MUD addict will like to see it evolve....and it will bring news players!

PS-No i will not pay to play a MUD (if it is only text based)
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MUDs will die the same day IRC does. And I don''t see either of them kicking the bucket soon. Despite being text-based, both continue to pick up new players/users on a daily basis. Because the text nature of the medium isn''t the reason why people find it fascinating. It''s the people they meet playing the games.

However, in their current form, I don''t think you could successfully charge for a MUD (or, at least, not charge *much*). Though you might be able to get away with it if you have top-notch writers and coders for it. Also, you would need to address issues such as stability, cheating, and player killing, all of which are issues preventing the growth of most new MUDs.


DavidRM
Samu Games
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MUDS were fun at a time when the internet had those mediocre 14.4 and even 28.8 connections. However, why play a text based game (even with those ANSII enhancements) when you got these great 3D graphical games? And to pay for a MUD...that''s almost like paying for tap water! MUDs are fun, but the hay day is over for them...kinda like ATARI. Still fun to play every now and again, but wouldn''t totally go for just them. I played and even hosted and MUD and several MUSHes. I was in Elendor also...good times ;-)
Robech

quote:
Original post by LostSoul

I love muds, but I wouldn''t ever consider paying for one. I have been playing a mud now for just about 3 years, and I haven''t yet become sick of it. I don''t think muds will ever be completely forgoten.

LostSoul


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I''m not a MUD expert but it seems to me that games along the line of UO, AC, and EQ are simply the evolution of MUDS to a graphic content with larger worlds. While I''m sure Origin and the rest make a pretty penny off of their online worlds I didn''t have a problem paying a few bucks (I played UO for a while before I realized I just didn''t have the time to make it worth my while). The amount of cash these folks have to pay for bandwith, high end servers, and engineers is no doubt quite large so they deserve to ask a little. Granted this is a bit different catagory than the old style text MUD. I may be going of an a tangent a bit but I still consider them an evolution of the old MUD even if the older style is still alive and kicking. As for the older text MUDS, as I said before I never got into them. However, even for them, I admire the folks who can find the machines, time, and motivation to offer their games for free.
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Somehow, I left this out of my first post:

I would never consider paying for a traditional mud (e.g. ascii..) People who would pay for muds are more and more going to be drawn to games like UO, EQ, AC, etc. If you can''t compete with them graphically, I doubt you will be able to maintain a paying subscriber base.

Still, I doubt that regular muds and mushes will dry up altogether. The thing is, they still do get newbies, on Elendor the rate is basically the same as it always has been.

Also, remember that graphics are not the end all, its also gameplay. I personally prefer the gameplay of angband to diablo. (Those of you who have never played the moria/angband line of games, be warned! There lies madness!)

MUDs/MUSHes, in addition (the free ones) typically have a lot of user base creativity infused in them. There is quite a bit of ownership there. The ability to create and add to the game world (and in the case of some, maintain a strictly themed environment..) is a fairly big draw. The graphical games can''t match this (yet?). I''ve seen some interesting things about Neverwinter Nights, including a longtime (and well regarded) PBeM DM, who intends to convert his campaign to a dedigated NN server..

Well, this was long and rambling.

Notwen
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Muds will die the same day BOOKS die. Why read a book when we have so many good MOVIES to see, and cool 3d video games to play?! Well, some people apparently find a reason.

Heh. Anonymous Poster indeed.

Anyway, I''m biased, I run a mud. Most muds aren''t going for the best ASCII Art awards, thats totally not the point. The better Muds out there will bring forth total immersion through well-developed sections, puzzles, stability, and (most importantly) players -- in short, STORY.

In reply to the original post, I would not pay to play a MUD, though I''ve made sacrifices to keep a Mud online (computer equipment, etc) but not as a player (though I know players who would and have done just that). Could a pay MUD be better than one built and maintained by people who enjoy the work enough to do it for free? Not enough to cause me to pay to play there!

My answer to the 3rd question should be pretty obvious from the first part of this post.

Lastly, MUDs can be a great escape (when played in moderation of course, heh) and I like that, it''s good to get away, meet up with some people from all over the world, and adventure.



-ns-
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Of course, what many of the little kiddiez of today don't understand is that not everything is handed to you on a platter.

What i mean by this, is that today's youth seems more interested in having everyone else think for them, rather than use thier own imagination. Hell, even a hell of a lot of people 5 years younger than me would never voluntarily pick up a book and read. "Tell me when the movie's out, i don't feel like using my brain".

well, thats exactly what MUD's are all about (the better ones at least); using your brain to imagine the world. Of course text games don't sell, because most people don't even want to read. Hell, i wonder how long it will take before written languages are declared obsolete by you non-imaginative's. (An interesting study i read said that the literacy rate for USA has been declining for 5 years in a row now... how sad. pathetic...)

Artwork has a place of course, but to debunk a game just because it has no graphics is stupid and naive.

We have brains and imaginations for a reason. Use them.
Or else we'll all become mindless zombies. (its already started of course, just look at the fasion and music industries. Teenagers actually LIKE being TOLD what to wear and listen to. its sad.)

to sum it all up for those of you too lazy to read the entire post...

USE YOUR MIND.



A man said to the universe:
"Sir I exist!"
"However," replied the universe,
"The fact has not created in me
A sense of obligation."

Edited by - Mithrandir on 2/1/00 7:48:22 AM
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