Jump to content
  • Advertisement

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Kint

OpenGL and GameCube

This topic is 6191 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I read somewhere in the forums that nintendos gamecube is compatible with OpenGL. I cant seem to find that thread but is this true? And also, wich (if any) nextgensytems will allow hobbydevs to program games on it? I mean like on the Yaroze or Dreamcast. One last thing: Gamecube seems to be one hell of a system but who the hell did nintendo hire to do its design? It looks horrible. It really does i mean i wouldnt like to have a purple "toybox" in my room when a girlfriend comes over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Oh, for crying out loud. It doesn''t matter what the silly thing looks like! Anyway, I''m sure your girlfriend will think it''s cute and adorable.

Any graphics hardware is "compatible" with OpenGL, to use your phrasing. Support of OpenGL on that hardware requires software: a proper driver. Someone could, for example, create an OpenGL driver for Xbox so developers weren''t stuck with stupid Direct3D. On the GameCube, I believe that there''s a very OpenGL-like API. The thinking was that it would give developers the chance to leverage existing skills, making development lots easier (which is one of the key design points of the ''Cube).

Anybody with enough time could figure out to develop for a system without the development kits. As far as which systems have development kits for consumers, *shrugs*. I tend to think that none of them would, though PlayStation 2 might have some really simple thing since the actual API is notoriously difficult. So, I doubt someone with such a product would be able to make anything noteworthy. The other companies also have no desire to put the entire power of their systems in the hands of "nobodies," so hobbyists are kinda stuck.

Since Xbox is essentially a PC, I imagine it to be one of the easiest targets for hobbyists. The processor and operating system are very familiar, as is the graphics hardware. So, people might write their own libraries to use with, say, the PC VC++, or you might see some piracy of the XDK. Then it''s just a matter of putting your game on a compatible DVD.

PlayStation 2 is probably not worth the trouble, considering its notorious difficulty. Plus, its hardware isn''t as powerful as, say, Xbox, which I think is probably easier.

GameCube also has some familiar components, namely the PowerPC-based processor inside. However, there are a number of ''Cube-specific instructions in there that are said to help with games. And the ATI chip is nothing like any other shipping ATI product, so that''ll be tough. Worse, the disc is proprietary, so you''d need hardware.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1. If you don't like the look of the Nintendo version of the GameCube, you could always get the Panasonic version (although it isn't officially going to be released in the US): http://www.coremagazine.com/news/5375.php3

2. GameCube uses the GX API, which as merlin9x9 correctly states is "like" OpenGL. Think of unextended OpenGL, with a few new features and a few changed features to take specific advantage of the GameCube hardware. With some knowledge of OpenGL it's very easy to program. It isn't however, directly source code compatible with OpenGL or binary code compatible with OpenGL code compiled for PPC.

3. PS2 has YABASIC available for it, and there is talk of Sony opening the system up for hobbyist programming.

Edited by - s1ca on December 29, 2001 8:11:36 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:

PlayStation 2 is probably not worth the trouble, considering its notorious difficulty. Plus, its hardware isn''t as powerful as, say,Xbox, which I think is probably easier.



Actually, I disagree, I mean, XBox is a lot easier true, and the PS2 is notoriously difficult being that it has 2 separate procesors, however, it is worth the trouble, since Sony is releasing Linux for PS2 (after its success in japan) to the whole world, so you might be able to code for it using good old trusty SDL (which has already been ported to PS2).
besides work is already going on in places like napalm.intelinet.com to hack it up like they did with the PSX, and they already have a couple of demos.
also remember the PS2 has a RISC processor (Mips R5900) while Xbox has a CISC processor (Pentium), so I think each is just as powerfull as the other since 1Mhz in CISC is not the same as in RISC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
re: demos on PS2 - I won't go into details (don't want to get people into trouble), but some console demo coders have day jobs working on commercial console titles and therefore have access to the full documentation.

re: PS2 having 2 processors - Almost - it has one processor (EE), with multiple co-processors (VUs) and separate graphics (GS), sound/IO processors (IOP). The co-processors run in parallel to the main CPU core, all data is transferred around with DMA. Keeping track of what is happening between multiple (co-)processors, and which data will arrive in which place at which time, plus the conservative amount of VRAM are two of the reasons the PS2 is percieved as "difficult".


Edited by - s1ca on December 29, 2001 12:39:26 AM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by S1CA
1. If you don''t like the look of the Nintendo version of the GameCube, you could always get the Panasonic version (although it isn''t officially going to be released in the US): http://www.coremagazine.com/news/5375.php3



damn.. its a pity they''re probably not gonna releas it in the US.
if it plays NTSC region dvds and games, then i''ll import it!





-eldee
;another space monkey;

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The new DVD/Gamecube hybrid called ''Q'' will not play US games and dvds. Otherwise I would have bought it for sure. Ill probably buy a Gamecube anyway even though it lacks dvd support and looks like it does

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hello, everyone. I am a prophet of a new and exciting platform to develop for. It will keep you from argueing about which system to develop for, when they can''t even develop for them! This new platform, named with just two letters, is capable of expanding every day, by people like you and me. You can easily develop for it, because no one really cares about development licenses and all that junk. You can even build your own, as I have mine. Because of its open architecture, you can buy, or even get for free, a complete program to compile your programs. Since the hardware is ever expanding, prices will be variable, but over time, they will become extremely cheap. So you wonder, ''How can I get this system?'', and ''I would do anything for this system!'' Well, since you want it so much, I''ll tell you the official codename:







(Drum roll, please.)






IBM PC x86 Compatible.

Teeheehee. I just had to do that. As for the Panasonic Cube, it looks cool, because it looks like a cross between Apple''s Cube and my sister''s CD player.
Knowing that evil, ghastly, Microsoft, M$ will probably sell a dev kit, named either devX, xdev, or dex, will sell you the hardware for $199.99, OS built-in (CE of course), and sell Visual Basic for it for $99.99. Of course, no one would buy this, so they''d sell Visual C++ for $150.00, claiming, "Compilers start at $110." Then we''d have the whole Professional-Enterprise fiasco (Standard wins, real programmers don''t have to rely on M$''s expensive, .NET compatibility compilers (IMHO)).
I bet Nintendo will eventually (the key word being eventually) make a dev kit, with some hype commercials about a dude with a fro programming the cube inside that metal cube.
I just realized this: if Sony releases DevKit for the PS2, I better get reading Mesa books (like there are any).
I think that one of the three will make a full-blown dev kit, and it''s probably going to be the loser of the battle (cough)X(cough).
If they do release a dev, I''ll be sure to buy one, because I havn''t given in to any of the three yet .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!