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Stefpet

Programmer AND artist?

31 posts in this topic

first, everyone has a biased view of their own art. you cannot see what''s wrong with it because you created it. your peers (or others that do not create art) either cannot point it out to you or will not point it out. a book can''t tell you what''s wrong because it''s inanimate. only an experienced higher level teacher (who''s probably gone through the same struggles) knows how to critically look at your work, tell you what''s good, what''s bad, and offer positive directions of improvement. everyone can improve no matter what level they''re at, but they need to know what needs to be improved first. secondly, competition. until you are in a competitive environment with other students and realize how small of a player you, how "natural talent" just isn''t good enough because millions of people are just as talented as you, you cannot realize the focus it requires. third, art history and understanding of aesthetics, how many of you "self taught" artists can honestly say you appreciate and understand the importance of works such as Duchamp''s "nude descending a staircase" or those done by futurists such as Boccioni? how can you call yourself an artist if you don''t even understand art from the 20th century? fourth, experience. experience is the most important part of an education, and without some driving force causing you to miss sleep every night because you are being worked to death, you will never have the motivation to gain adequate experience. all of you will claim you are self motivated, but without professors forcing you to eat, sleep, and breath your work, i guarantee you, you cannot even imagine what motivation is.
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as to the comment about the picture that formerly existed in the thread, the claim was not that it used photoshop filters, whether it was drawn by hand or not is not the issue. the issue is that it was pretty obvious the poster was "self taught." I do not want to personally attack anybody here so I won''t tear it apart, I''m just saying that the difference is glaring between someone who is "self taught" and someone who has a "trained aesthetic eye." if it wasn''t, I wouldn''t have been able to discern to easily that this was the case.
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I agree with the need to have someone unbiased look at your art to tell you what's wrong with your art. I'm always asking my wife her opinion of my art. Even though she's not artistic, she can tell me what it looks like the character is doing or what kind of expression he/she has. However, I dissagree with most of the rest of that statement. I believe people can look at their own art unbiased if they take a logical look at it and compare it against the model they drew from. You can also look at it backwords which makes it appear as a new image in your mind. Many people are not driven by competition, but if you want to compare your art against someone else's art, there are more then enough examples on the web. I don't see the importance of art history. If you're drawing for fun, or drawing for a game, you don't need to know about the contrast of a soft round model against the hard, square stairs. And anyone who's serious about art can find time to draw. I've been drawing cartoon characters for the last 10 months, I'm almost done with my 5th sketch book and each book has 70 pages. The last book I started on Jan 1st and it's almost filled.
One problem I have with classes is that they don't give you enough freedom to explore different styles of drawing. My characters have changed greatly almost every couple of weeks. Everything from feet, eyes, ears and tails. (I like drawing "furries" and how many classes teach THAT?)

BTW: I've seen just as many people who have gone to art school that can't draw worth a darn.

E:cb woof!

Edited by - dog135 on 2/3/00 5:42:20 PM
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Come on guys...posting comments about pirated software? While I can see that cost may limit an individuals ability to buy the software, sothey must "acquire" it another way, this is NOT the place to be posting that kind of information. This IS a public forum, and many of you have you personal info entered into the system...anyone could easily come by and report you. If you have to talk about this kind of thing (which I can neiter support nor condemn, at least not publicly), hop on any one of the Undernet IRC servers, there''s a few hundred channels to talk about this kind of thing (or so I''m told).

-Nick Robalik
http://www.digital-soapbox.com
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I''m sort of both an artist and programmer...More of a programmer, but I can draw alright...

***BINS***
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Hey, none of my stuff is illegal. Like I said, I get the original disks from my mom once she decides not to use it again. (although posting that FTP site wasn''t well thought out)

E:cb woof!
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You know, everything depends on what do you think art is. Is this site designed artistically?

As for pirated software. Here in Ukraine finding illegal software 1000 times easier than legal one (no exageraing). It'' being selled on a completely legal markets. 3D MAX costs $2 for example (every CD costs $2). Sellers pay taxes and state likes the way everything goes. I don''t. I as a sofware developer don''t like to see my software pirated, neither someone else''. I want to buy legal copies, but I DON''T have cash to do. I know 0 people who can and buys it. Bad, but it''s true and first people have have money, but if you make legal buisness taxes kill you.

If you think you can make any harm to me or to anyone outside US who uses pirated soft or to illegal sites - you''re wrong. Police just F@#%s that here. See higher.
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