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iNsAn1tY

*.md3 Specification

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Evening all. I was just wondering if anyone knew where I could find the specification for the *.md3 model files the Quake III engine uses? I''d like to either use that model format, or examine it to help me create my own (I have already created my own texture and map formats). I was also wondering what drawing software id Software use to create their *.md3 files. It must be something very powerful, perhaps custom made, bespoke software. Does anyone know where I might acquire it? I know they use high-end graphics workstations, but I''m getting a new computer soon, with a very decent 3D card (hopefully), so I should be able to run it. I''ve experimented with milkshape 3D, but the lack of a comprehensive tutorial makes it a little difficult to learn. Also, does anyone know what the "shaders" are, which the *.md3 files utilize? Any help will be greatly appreciated... iNsAn1tY - the place where imagination and the real world merge... Try http://uk.geocities.com/mentalmantle
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Hi Insanity,

I can''t provide much help on your second too queries but if you d/l either of the Quake3 Loader projects from:

http://www.sulaco.co.za/opengl2.htm

you will not only get an example *.md3 loader and its source but it comes with an article on the *.md3 format, which I found very useful when implementing *.md3 models in my game.

Hope that helps,
Crash,



"We Must Move Forwards NOT Backwards, Sideways NOT Forwards And Always Twirling Twirling Towards Success." - 2000

"If You Keep Looking Forward Your Gonna End Up Looking Backwards At Yourself Running Sideways!" - 2001
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Hmmm. I downloaded the program, and it''s source, but it''s written in Pascal! I have some experience with Pascal (they forced me to learn it in AS Computing), but I don''t know it in depth, so I can''t decipher how the program works. The *.MD3 format file was very interesting and useful, and I''ll write an MD3 loader in C soon...

iNsAn1tY - the place where imagination and the real world merge...
Try http://uk.geocities.com/mentalmantle
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Thanks for the input, people. I''m well on the way to creating an MD3 loader, and I even found out what shaders do...

In fact, it was an absolute fluke I found it. I was watching Shrek, on DVD, and I looked at the "Tech of Shrek" documentary. It showed how they create the models (Useless fact: did you know that the model for each character in Shrek had about 800,000 polygons per frame!? Beats the crap* out of my 1000 polygon models!), and how they light and shade them.

A shader (I think) is used to tell the polygons what shade they have to be when light hits them, during a raycast. I can now imagine how they are put to use in Quake III.

* - I know that they have massive high-end graphics workstations, so all the lighting is done with raycasts, and they use a different system to how computer games are made.

iNsAn1tY - the place where imagination and the real world merge...
Try http://uk.geocities.com/mentalmantle
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Umm, not quite. Q3A shaders are the fancy little effects applied to parts of the models, like the static visor of that one marine girl, and the flame effects on some of the models. They''re more like constantly updating animated textures.
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id used 3D Studio Max to do most of the modeling for Q3A (Doom III is using Maya, I believe.) Both of them are very expensive, but there''s a free version of 3DS Max, made for game content called GMax. You may want to try that out.
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Thanks. I have enquired about 3DS Max (I can get it for £600 here in the UK, and that''s on student licence!)

I haven''t seen Maya, but I''ve heard many positive things about it, so I might get that instead. I''m very interested in GMax, as I''ve never heard of that. Thanks again...

iNsAn1tY - the place where imagination and the real world merge...
Try http://uk.geocities.com/mentalmantle
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i read recently maya is available (free with restrictions to students) worth checking out, it is a lot better than 3dmax

http://uk.geocities.com/sloppyturds/gotterdammerung.html
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Well discreet has produced a MD3 exporter for gmax, and both gmax and the tempest gamepak (the quake3 stuff) is free, so I would suggest grabbing both of those. *nods*

- Shane
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