Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

SuperRoy

3d modelling

Recommended Posts

SuperRoy    109
Hi... I was wondering a few things about 3d modelling (in Milkshape 3D, mind you). I''m starting to get into OpenGL...So I figure I should be able to model something . How does one get started in modelling? I''ve seen lots of really elegant models...smooth, sleek. How do you make it so curvy? Do you use all the preset things like Rectangle, Sphere, Triangle...or do you program all the vertices? Thanks a lot, --Roy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ZoomBoy    162
There are two aspects
1) the poly count: With more polygons you can make everything smoother and that especially counts when making curved items. For polys mean the angles between to 2 hard straight surfaces. If you look on my my web-site
at my 3D boot, you''ll see the curved nature of the lower part transitioning to the straight upper part. I had various forms of the boot that looked bad. I added more polys and then I smoothed many of the vertices(tough work)
To get the original boot(in TrueSpace) I started from the bottom and worked my way up, flat layer after layer, smoothing each as it was extruded. You need a bit of foresight to the path of its growth.

2) Texturing also goes a long way to smoothness especially shadowing. It allows you to have a lower poly count and the shadows smooth in the crevasses between to sharp angles.

If you''re doing an in-game 3D model, some low-count polygon skills are needed because you''re going to have a polygon budget that is limited by the engine and the user''s computer. i.e A scene can have a limit of 3000 triangles. Then decisions have to be made: do you have 10 300 poly monsters or 2 1500 poly monsters (and then add in the complexity of the background - flat and ugly background or good-looking but poly costly) There are always trade-offs

If you''re doing pre-rendered 3D sprites then pile on the polys. Like I''m doing.

ZoomBoy
Developing a iso-tile 2D RPG with skills, weapons, and adventure. See my old Hex-Tile RPG GAME, character editor, diary, 3D Art resources at Check out my web-site

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sounds like what you''re getting into here is what''s called organic modelling, which is a nightmare to most people, including me.

Rule of thumb for organic modelling: Don''t use polys unless there''s absolutely no other way.

If you want decent curved surfaces, you need either Nurbs, Metaballs, or some other program-specific system of curve modelling. I''ve tried building up from polygons and it simply doesn''t get you anywhere.

If you use Blender, it has an EXCELLENT system for curve modelling, where you only tweak a couple of vertices to change a whole surface. It''s called a Bezier curve in Blender, I don''t know what other programs call it. You can also attach a special lattice mesh to an object and use that to deform it in a similar way, but the advantage of that is that it can be animated.

Ultimately, you will have to convert all these into polys anyway, but it''s much easier to model them in curve mode.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peeves    122
I recommend saving up and buying 3D Studio Max r4, once you get it, use character studio or the 3D Studio max IK system to animate, use Texporter plugin for your textures, very nice, effective, and quick tool to use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites