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BlackHammer

What education do I need?

26 posts in this topic

I have several questions that I need answered: How many wpm should I be able to type? Would a college education be better or University education? If either, which coures should I take? What should I learn on my own? _________________________________________________________________ I would Like to let everyone know that I have next to no knowledge on C, C++, or other programming languages.
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um,

first question would be what job are you looking for? designer? programmer? manager? marketing?

in any case wpm doesn't come into play. code doesn't really break down into words per say and how much code you can program per minute is meaningless.

also for the undergraduate level of education there is no difference between a college and a university outside of universitys typically being able to offer more resources b/c they tend to be bigger (though that;s probs an over generalization)

how old are you?

-me

Edited by - Palidine on January 11, 2002 4:01:30 PM
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I am thinking in the direction of designer and/or programmer. You see, I am REALLY good at math and this is an industry that I have looked into for the past year.
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as a first response i''d say that if you''re in high school, find a computer science course to take and see if you like programming. if you''re not in high school yet but are motivated then find a c or c++ intro book and give a shot at teaching yourself to program. or better yet find a friend to teach you.

-me
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I am 19 as of the end of January. Right now I am a high school student, and yes, I am going to take programming courses as of next semester.
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heh, my lunchbreak= infinite replys

anyway, cool. learning a language is the first thing. if it turns out that you hate sitting in front of a computer debugging code for hours but are still interested in gaming, then perhaps conceptual design or team management might be better.

anyway, the first thing to figure out is programmer v. something else.

then you gotta pick a college. find one with a good CS department but also one that''s got some other really good stuff going for it in case you end up hating everything to do with programming and gaming (i was going to be a doctor but then fell in love with programming and switched majors). actually most people i know completely changed their minds in college about what they wanted to do. some funny changes of mind were literature to computer science and someone else did math to literature.

as i said before for undergraduate education (i.e. your first time through) university == college. same thing.

anyway if you''ve got AIM and want a faster conversation send a message to Malted Monkey

-me

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The science of everything realated to computers
Like social science is history, current events, etc.
Wild guess...

||--------------------------||
Black Hole Productions
President/Programmer/Expert on stuff
||--------------------------||
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Computer science is a a seperate major on its own. Many people major in it. Essentially, if you major in computer science, you are going to learn the ins and out of all the theoretical "stuff" that is in programming, lots of math, and how to program a myriad of complex things.

For example, you''ll learn order of magnitude ("Big O"), operating systems, security, network design, programming techniques, and more programming techniques, all sorts of theory, you can specialize in all sorts of things, there''s more...
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I won''t even bother reading what anyone else has said. No, I''ll relate my own experience here.

This is the "For Beginners" forum, right? So many people come here and made fourteen-year-old kids think they just _have_ to learn Calculus and Computer Science right this minute. Poppycock.

I will tell you that, when it comes to math, it doesn''t take long before it all comes together and you get your foot in the door (ouch!)-- but only if you are determined to learn it. That is a firm rule. You have to be determined. For math, always be aware of your weakness, and try to fix it. _That''s_ the only part that takes time.

The best place to learn what you don''t know is, despite what EVERYONE else will tell you in this lame forum, is the library. It''s the perfect place to study. You have books all around you, so there''s no lacking of information-- you could find a book on Calculus if you wanted to (I have ). Actually, a lot of the best information out there is at the library.

At school and even on these supposedly reader-friendly internet tutorials, they give you really technical stuff you just cross your eyes over. Don''t be embarassed because everyone would.

But at the library, I found a book called "Calculus the Easy Way," which is a Calculus text in the form of a humorous fantasy story, where the characters solve problems and discover the principles of Calculus along the way. What''s more, it''s just one in a whole series of books. There''s one on Trigonometry, Physics, writing, typing, and even a few on programming (Fortran, BASIC, and Pascal).

So, go to the library, and go there a lot. On the Internet, you MIGHT find something interesting. But at the classic library, you WILL. And you don''t even need to pay anyone.

Take things one at a time (baby steps). And remember that this might not be your field. What I did see of your other replies, someone asked what you want to become-- a designer, a programmer, et cetera. Do you really _want_ to be in this field at all? I know I don''t. I do this as a hobby, and I have other interests. Just take things one step at a time.

And I''m sure you''re typing skills won''t hold you back.
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If you decide to persue any number of options for game development there is a great school in Florida called full sail. It''s a little pricey though. Look into it. http://www.fullsail.com
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1) Do not worry about WPM. Your typing skills will improve after typing code for awhile.
2) Education? Buy a book and read it. That''s about it. To be a good ''certified'' programmer, you need at least some type of degree. There are famous programmers that dropped out of college, but do you really want to take that chance?

There is alot of math involved. You''ll need at least trig, but it depends on what you are coding.

I am pretty much in the same boat .. too many questions and doubts. Just keep close to the goal that you have.

I recommend learning BASIC first and then moving over to C/C++ or pascal. There is a qbasic program on your windows OS disk.. or just visit download.com and look up basic.

Eventually learn C/C++ or pascal.. most people choose the second choice.

pascal is similar to C.. so the conversion should not be a problem.

good luck.

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quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
I won't even bother reading what anyone else has said. No, I'll relate my own experience here.

This is the "For Beginners" forum, right? So many people come here and made fourteen-year-old kids think they just _have_ to learn Calculus and Computer Science right this minute. Poppycock.

I will tell you that, when it comes to math, it doesn't take long before it all comes together and you get your foot in the door (ouch!)-- but only if you are determined to learn it. That is a firm rule. You have to be determined. For math, always be aware of your weakness, and try to fix it. _That's_ the only part that takes time.

The best place to learn what you don't know is, despite what EVERYONE else will tell you in this lame forum, is the library. It's the perfect place to study. You have books all around you, so there's no lacking of information-- you could find a book on Calculus if you wanted to (I have ). Actually, a lot of the best information out there is at the library.

At school and even on these supposedly reader-friendly internet tutorials, they give you really technical stuff you just cross your eyes over. Don't be embarassed because everyone would.

But at the library, I found a book called "Calculus the Easy Way," which is a Calculus text in the form of a humorous fantasy story, where the characters solve problems and discover the principles of Calculus along the way. What's more, it's just one in a whole series of books. There's one on Trigonometry, Physics, writing, typing, and even a few on programming (Fortran, BASIC, and Pascal).

So, go to the library, and go there a lot. On the Internet, you MIGHT find something interesting. But at the classic library, you WILL. And you don't even need to pay anyone.

Take things one at a time (baby steps). And remember that this might not be your field. What I did see of your other replies, someone asked what you want to become-- a designer, a programmer, et cetera. Do you really _want_ to be in this field at all? I know I don't. I do this as a hobby, and I have other interests. Just take things one step at a time.

And I'm sure you're typing skills won't hold you back.


You know what....that was beautiful, sniff =.).. This post actually answers questions that Ive asked in this forum before and that have gone unanswered. I am very good at math and logic but I sometimes wonder if all the veterans in these forums are geniuses and Im completely wasting my time.

The problem is that I am a newbie at programming and I often look through higher level books only to cringe at the sight of the material. Remember when you were a little kid and you passed by the higher classes only to see all this gibberish on the blackboard and a feeling of curiosity coupled with fear came over you? Thats how I feel. Its reassuring to see that it happens or has happened to others in here too and that perhaps I have a chance =). This post should be permanently placed atop this forum for all scared newbies to read.


Edited by - hapaboy on January 12, 2002 4:37:20 AM
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quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
But at the library, I found a book called "Calculus the Easy Way," which is a Calculus text in the form of a humorous fantasy story, where the characters solve problems and discover the principles of Calculus along the way. What''s more, it''s just one in a whole series of books. There''s one on Trigonometry


Well last year my stupid maths teacher failed to drill a single bit of trig into my head, we are nearly about to do more work on it again (with a much better maths teacher might i add though), errmmm... What where these books called?, they might just save my so-far-short life....



Website:PC-Gaming

MSN messenger:garcon_bifteck@hotmail.com

Email:garconbifteck@pc-gaming.com
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garconbifteck,

The trig book is called Trigonometry The Easy Way. It''s ISBN # is 0-7641-1360-7. I''ve been reading the trig one and the Physics The Easy Way and they both have been good so far.
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When I took trig, it was pretty much learning the formulas (as with any math class).

I learned what the unit circle was and the big three trig functions sin, cos, and tan.
Then learned the inverse functions.. and graphed the guys.

remember to learn these functions
sin(u-v)
sin(u+v)
cos(u-v)
cos(u+v)
+half angle and double angle formulas


A lot of formulas are extracted from them.
I took this last semester.. and I shiver when I look in my Calculus book..
my instructor DID skip over vectors.. DOH!!! so I think it''s going to be another book throwing semester.
(nothing like throwing the book across the room.. taking another look at it and actually figuring it out)


I am not a teenager either... so I consider myself a late bloomer at 24 years old... I''m probably older than 50% of most members on gamedev!

Mathematics is NOT easy, but it is rewarding. I can look at one of my 3D books and understand half the formulas now.


just take it one step at a time...



This is a view of ideas at work

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quote:
Original post by garconbifteck
My conclusion

Computer science = all the computer stuff




All the software and math based stuff.

Hardware design is Computer Engineering. But that''s completely non-programming.

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Just like to let you guys know...if you havent noticed yourselves. I checked Amazon.com and read a lot of comments on the calculus the easy way and trig the easy way books. From what I can gather, the calculus book is very good but the trig book has many errors and leaves much to be desired. Just wanted to warn those thinking about getting the trig book, perhaps another book would be better to learn trig from, then you can move on to calculus the easy way. Im still looking for the right book for myself.
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Hey,
what do u guys think of full sail(fullsail.com) i heard that its a trade school and most people have a hard time breaking inot the industry because employers arent looking for the skills taught at full sail, for the most part, they are looking for a more rounded education, u guys agree?? is there anyone here who knows about this sort of gaming hiring stuff that could answer my question? thanks


,Matt

-= kill one, your a murderer, kill thousands your a conquerer =-
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I will say this as this day for me has been just checking it all out. 1st Go to the library and look at some programming books
second also look at all the higher math books. Vectors and algo-
rythims are very important. Now if this is not to much, find some books on graphic design both 2d/3d, then find a few books on
music prorams such as cakewalk.
You will see that there is a vast array of topics that go into game development not just programming, and that you can actualy learn all this without any formal schooling. Now I must say that if you want to work for the big boys they expect you to have some kind of degree in any area. The thing is to find out what it is that trips your trigger.
Personaly I have a very great and diverse background and still need all the help I can get. Just try to figure out a direction then go for it and try not to get dicouraged when it gets really tough. You have control over your education and that more than anything you should have as truely ,that in it''s self is power.
If you can do algebra you can do trig, If you can do Trig you can do calculas, If you can do calculas you will start to understand Physics.
Now on the other hand , If you learn and understand basic,you
are now primed to learn any other language, now expand, move to C, C++, Pascal although this is only glorified Basic, You really need to Learn The object-oriented Languages as they are the besis of all 3D programming.
Okay, now you need direction. Portion of a game or whole game.
By yourself or with some kind/size of team. That is the Kool thing of School as to self taught, you build CONNECTIONZ.
This is where you will actualy find that there is at least one other, in class or school that shares a common vision that can be built upon.
You should also know that if this is what you choose then you should be in LOVE with it as the reality is that you will be like most and settle for the passion of saying I made this or
that game and not need to collect from it moniteraly. I will also tell you this. When any of US tell you we do it only for LOVE WE LYE, because WE ALL have dreams, Most of us also have regular jobs either by day or by night, Now you see the Laboure of love.
It really is not as hard as it sounds, but it is even Less
glorious the you dream, Like writing the next ROOTS, you still have to write and that takes awhile. Anyone can tell a story but can you make people feel you are the one they are writing about,
in other words, can you make people feel that you are either talking about them or are in fact themselves.
The same is true about your games, Are you Duke, LARA,
the Pilot of the Latest X-Wing, Get it?
This has been long and the point is Learn as much as you can, in all the parts of this Monster BIZ and you will find your NICHE and you will Succeed!!! Best Of Luck - THE Kid

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I, too, have wondered recently the same questions and have done some looking to see what seems to be the best education and what universities/colleges offer the best type of education and courses/resources. Just recently I have found that the University of North Texas (http://www.unt.edu/) obviously has a program called LARC where students, mainly those majoring in computer science, come together and learn what it takes to be part of a team of programmers who develop and make games. The computer science students are paired up with some of the art students and together they plan and actually code a game to completion. The LARC site says that students will make a game demo CD that they will be able to use for future job applications.

I''ve also heard about Full Sail, and it seems like it would be a good place to become specialized in game development for those with some sort of computer science degree. I''ve only been into programming for about 8 months, taken a course in C++, but I must say that I''ve really enjoyed it. I just picked up Tricks of the Windows Game Programming Gurus to learn a little bit of Win32/DirectX programming. I realize that some of its topics are outdated (i.e., DirectDraw was done away with as of DirectX 8, i think), but I think it does a good job of teaching just the beginner the basics. Like some people have said before, might wanna check out a few books, go to your library and spend some time there. Unfortunately my library is very limited, but occasionally I can go to the university library and browse through a few books.

Whatever you decide, just remember to stick to it and don''t get discouraged.
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Hi all! This is the first time I've ever posted here on this website. I am definitely a newbie to the world of computer programming, but reading this message board gives me optimism about learning this stuff. I am a junior at UC Davis majoring in BioSci and Psychology, but my interest in learning how to program has recently grown dramatically.

I took a C programming course 2 years ago and did fine, but the next quarter I took a C++/Unix programming course (along with a full class load) and had to drop out because it was too time consuming.

It initially scared me off from attempting to learn programming entirely. Being stuck in the cold, dim computer lab basement every day of the week with no allowance for food was too much for me. I also think having to learn C++ AND Unix script programming in less than 2.5 months (the length of a quarter) just added more unnecessary stress.

Presently, I am relearning everything I learned--starting with the basics. On my leisure time, I am reading How to Program C++ by Deitel & Deitel and answering EVERY SINGLE problem at the end of each chapter, making sure that I learn each concept to the fullest. I have quickly found that those 24-hour books just don't cut it when you want to really have a feel for what you are reading about. I am also using Oreilly's Unix CD Bookshelf to help me learn commands in Mandrake Linux 8.1.

So far, learning to programm is purely a hobby for me, but I hope to take a couple more programming classes before I graduate. I took advanced calculus and physics earlier in my college career, but unfortunately wasn't as studious back then as I am now. I will read up on those subjects when I have the time.

I guess my motivation for learning programming is the thought of educational software--particularly edutainment. I was wondering if any of you guys knew how people get started in this business. I am not certain of making a career (or money) in that field, for I am just learning the basics as of now. But I would like some perspective and opinions from others on the state of things in the educational software arena. Thank you for reading all this!

Cheers,
Justin

Edited by - justlnluck on January 15, 2002 2:08:37 AM
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