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hapaboy

[java] What next?

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I have just finished "Java: An introduction to computer science" by Walter Savitch (I must say this is one of the best written technical books I have ever read). In it I have covered the basics of OOP, data structures, exception handling, file I/O, some Swing and applet, and some graphics with the use of the Graphics class. My question is..whats next? Im kinda lost because I dont want to buy books that only repeat what I have already learned and I dont want to buy books that are beyond my scope. Does anyone know of a good intermediate java programming book that will take me to the next step? I dont necessarily want to learn how to make games but I do want to learn Java programming in greater depth. Thanks all for replying =)

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I know of a few general books on Java programming, but I don''t know if any of them go into more detail than what you have already done, which is what you seem to be looking for.

Perhaps you should pick specific subjects, and get books on those subject themselves. Books covering specific subjects usually teach you far more than a general book covering the entire language.

For example, if you wanted to learn more about Thread programming, than the O''Reilly Thread book is an entire book just about threads and thread concepts. In most Java books, you get a single chapter on threads.

There are Java books on just IO, Networking, Threads, Cryptography, and more. I refer to these books more than my first Java book when it comes to harder topics.

Michael

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I''d suggest that the best way to learn at the point you are at is to think of some programs you''d like to write, and try writing them. Whenever you run into a problem, find resources specifically for dealing with that problem.

Basically, the best way to learn at an intermediate level is to practice.

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I must agree with c_wraith. There really aren''t any intermediate books for most languages. They teach the basics and let you go on alone. Learning by doing is the only way to go from here on out. If you have specific questions post them here or try to search for them. If you can''t even formulate specific questions to ask, then you know more than you think. Also, patterns are a good next step to look into, they teach you how to structure your code to solve certain problems. I''ve also found that students have a hard time really grasping interface usage. Try to write some programs that utilize interfaces to facilitate class inter-communication.

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quote:
Original post by Jim_Ross
I must agree with c_wraith. There really aren''t any intermediate books for most languages. They teach the basics and let you go on alone. Learning by doing is the only way to go from here on out. If you have specific questions post them here or try to search for them. If you can''t even formulate specific questions to ask, then you know more than you think. Also, patterns are a good next step to look into, they teach you how to structure your code to solve certain problems. I''ve also found that students have a hard time really grasping interface usage. Try to write some programs that utilize interfaces to facilitate class inter-communication.


I''m not sure about Java, but I know WROX press usually has a really good line of books for specific subjects in languages that go up the ladder.
For instance their VB books go from beginner to intermediate to advanced and cover varieties of topics. They usually build on each other or cover certain topics progressively.

BeS
It''s Da BOMB Baby!!!
. o O ~
A little nonsense now and then,
is relished by the wisest men
~ O o .
-- Willy Wonka

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