Jump to content
  • Advertisement

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

fishpunch

Developing game for College Class

This topic is 5973 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hi all: Formalities: My name is Andrew McSweeny and I am currently a Senior in Computer Science at the University of Toledo. I am on a team of 3 people in a class entitled ''Senior Design Project.'' We have decided to take it upon ourselves to design a 3D game in Visual C++. Question: Does anyone here have any advice on: software to use, sites to visit, books to read, mistakes to avoid, etc. I have heard the best route is OpenGL and Milkshape3D. Are these worth using? Perhaps DirectX is faster than OpenGL, no? Can 3d studio max be used to design models? - Andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Firstly, OpenGL & DirectX are not easily comparable. They do the same thing - display graphics. (you should look up the topic using google.com)

Secondly, if you chose to use opengl, i''d suggest reading and the first 9 of Nehe''s tutorials (nehe.gamedev.net) and perhaps a couple of the blending ones to learn and understand the api commands and how they are used.

Its not easy to list all the mistakes many of us have made using the api, silly mistakes as most of them were, you can only fix them when you come across them, or at least have your project entirely written out before you to limit them. There is no perfect programmer, and trying out an idea to see if it works is better than not trying it because you think your compiler wont understand it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Your right, DirectX and OpenGL arn't easily compairable - because one is a set of sound\graphics\video\input libraries, and the other is just a 3D API....

Now, Direct3D and OpenGL can be compaired very easily. Concidering they are practically the same these days.

Only cavaet with Direct3D is that you wont be able to port it as easy to non-microsoft platforms (That may be a non-issue.)

3D Studio Max can be used to design models - but on a students salary, its probably not recommended unless you give yourself the 5 finger discount.

If I were in your position id use milkshape and opengl and read nehe's tutorials.


Edited by - Caffeine on January 14, 2002 7:38:12 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you don''t have experience with 3d graphics, skip it. You can''t get up to speed sufficiently to design and implement a 3d game in a single semester - unless this Senior Design Project is a whole year long.

Not that I''m trying to discourage you. It is fully possible that you can accomplish this (being a senior, I''m sure you have the requisite design and programming skills). Just the note of caution so you don''t squander all your time...

Good luck.

[ GDNet Start Here | GDNet FAQ | MS RTFM | STL | Google ]
Thanks to Kylotan for the idea!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I disagree. I''ve learnt a huge amount in a week. Then again I suppose I am doing nothing else so can concentrate fully on this.

- seb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NEWBIE
Ive been working with c/c++ for a while now.
DirectX is a messy API, but once understood and put into easier functions, it can be beneficial(spelling?)
ive used DirectDraw, Input, and Sound, and they are good for 2d prog. But have a steepish learning curve, so i would say the same for Dierct3D.

On the other hand, I ve read and learned 1 to 16 of NeHes tutorials within 3 days, so OpenGL is very easy to learn.

And, to get the DirectX 8 SDK, someone said its a 9 hour download, whereas OpenGL comes with VIS C++,

OK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My advice to you: use OpenGL. I do not say this because I think it''s better, only because of time constraints. Direct3D is powerful and useful, but I can guarantee you it will take you longer to reach a level in which you can make a game. OpenGL had the advantage of being very easy to learn, and independant of such dificulties as COM. Had you more time, I would say either is just as good, as I do not wish to get burned here. But in reality, opengl IS easier to learn. With your time limits you should easily be able to make it through (understanding) the vital opengl tutorials on NeHe.GameDev.net, while you may not manage such a task with Direct3D.

Other advice: get OpenGL Game Programming; if you do not know the structure of a game engine, this will teach it to you in fairly simplistic terms. At your level I assume you know all of the needed math to tackle such a project as well. If not, then how the heck did you get where you are?

Also, milkshape3d IS a good modeler, as was said. I reccommend it if you are on a limited budget (I assume you are).

There is no need to follow my advice, but it''s better than finding out that you can''t do something in a time space at the last second, believe me.

I wish you the best of luck on your project, keep us posted in the forum! I find this kind of thing very interesting.

Alex Broadwin
A-Tronic Software & Design
-----
"if you fail in life, you were destined to fail. If you suceed in life, call me."
"The answer is out there."
"Please help, I''m using Windows!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I''ve been useing OpenGL for about a year now but i just recently started makeing a game engine with it. In about a month and a half i''ve coded 60%-70% of the engine. I''ve found OpenGL Game Programming is a very gould referance for makeing an engine. Milkshape is my secound choice of discount modelers next to GMax (which if you download the Tempest add-on for GMax you can export to any file format by useing milkshape''s import export functions). Good luck to you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mistakes to avoid -> don''t type before you''ve LEARNED to spell.



A man walks into a bar.....ouch!?! Ya get it, do ya huh huh well....awww I give up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

Participate in the game development conversation and more when you create an account on GameDev.net!

Sign me up!