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SA-Magic

Work experience

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SA-Magic    130
Hello there. I''m a budding games designer, doing Computer Studies at New College Durham. Questions: 1) Zileas of Ethermoon Entertainment told me that a career as a games designer is risky, so it''s best to have a ''secondary'' job you can do computer related. What are these ideal jobs? I''m quite experienced in sound editing (Cool Edit, Sound Forge, Goldwave), but not much in programming (Only done Pascal at college so far) or web design (Quite difficult). Naturally, I consider myself quite good at games design and coming up with good ideas. Then again, I will have uni (Teeside college in Games Design) to learn more skills. Any specific suggestions of what''s worthwhile as a secodnary skill? 2) Does anyone know anything about work experience? I need to do some for one month this March, and there are no developers around the North East of England in the UK (Not since Reflections closed down after making Driver 1 anyway). The closest place is Rage in Liverpool, and they only do the long-term Uni work experiences. Where else would be suitable to get experience? The closest place I can think of would be a games store (e.g. GAME, Electronic Boutique), but I was advised that''s not specifc enough (It''s more retail). Any advice or suggestions?

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Hase    313
Yup, he´s definitely right about that "second job". If you know your way around sound editing and are reasonably interested then I would pursue that.

I doubt that you will get anything games-related for just a month, all you´d be doing is making coffee and doing .. basically nothing. It simply doesn´t pay for a game development firm to hire people for such short durations.
Forget the game store, you might earn a little money but the experience (relevant to your field) will be close to zero.

About game design, sometimes work is contracted out to third parties, I´d try and look for that (that´s how I got started in game design).

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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
Hey I just applied to study Games Design at Teeside, maybe I''ll see you there Sorry I don''t really have much more to add to the answer from Hase though.

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SA-Magic    130
Hase- well, if any sound editors could reply and confirm if I am experienced or not, I''d be most grateful.
Wouldn''t the games store itself be an interesting secondary job? Granted, too much console info would be granted (I''m a PC preferred myself). What do you suggest then? Any ideas for where I could work at all.

Anonymous Poster- Indeed, the course appears to be popular. Tell me, do you have the requried entrant grades? My GSCE''s were great, but I''ve 0 Merits on my colleg ecourse (And the course is supposed to require 3), yet a teacher and another friend at uni have both separately said there''s a chance I could still get in. Do you have the merits and do you think you''ll get in?
You may mail me at sa-magic@joymail.com if you wish to discuss this more conveniently.

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Hase    313
I meant that the game store wouldn´t really give you any experience relevant to development. Rather try and look for freelance work in the field, maybe you can help out as sound engineer somewhere, maybe it´ll even be possible to get a short-term job (although I doubt it).

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Lugie    122
i''d suggest getting into nanotechnolegy, we could always use smaller stuff.

but seriously, i dont think its really a great industry to major in :/

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SA-Magic    130
What''s not good to major in- games development or nanotechnology\sound editing? I sure as heck hope the latter, otherwise you''re on the wrong forum. :D

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digitaldirt    122
Do you just record with a computer Mic and mess around in these Cool Edit, Gold Wave and Sound forge proggies... or do you actually do foley work and EQ/PAN design work?

Sound Editing and Sound Designing are titles that I think a lot of people abuse. Foley work, is the art of recording sounds and editing them into a sequence. It is a very precise and long processed kind of work. But not just sampling. Actually having a foley studio/pit with various items that you will make your sounds with. It works the same for games as it does for movies/films.

Even sound design today as a career requires Professional Audio skills, broad knowledge of different kinds of Mics, mixers, compressors as well as classic and modern recording techniques. If you were to get a job at a local studio in your area as an intern, you could probably learn the ropes a little faster.

Just as i don''t consider someone who uses Acid and only Acid Loop libraries a musician/composer, I don''t consider someone who tinkers in soundforge a sound designer... But I think that Loop software is a good way to start out in the beginning. Just don''t become too dependent on loops and sample CD''s. or you turn yourself into an Acid whore... and we have too many of those on Mp3.com.

lol.

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SA-Magic    130
Well yeah, I''m no absolute pro. But from the people I talk to, being able to use CE, SF and GW is a good achievement. Don''t know much about EQ/PAN design work.
And I don''t do music, just sound editing. But yeah, maybe I''m in a decent position to learn...

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eldee    122
if you're going to pursue music, make sure you take
every availible class.. and learn some more widely
used software..
for example, for my audio processing needs, i use
Cubase VST/24 (for multi-track recording), Logic
Audio Platinum (top notch software.. excellent as
a software sequencer), Sonic Foundry Sound Forge
(wav editor.. accepts plugins for processing, can
edit all 5 channels, open/save as mp3, plus it's just
all around handy for making neat-o sounds.)
hrm. and thats about all i use.
some people will tell you to get fruity loops or
acid or something...
but if music was as easy as clicking random notes and
hitting play, then i'd venture to guess there'd be more
people in the industry doing just that

my advice: check into a (local?) recording studio
for temp jobs.. alot of them will allow you to
work for next-to-free for on the job experience..
this is how i learned.
good luck!


-eldee
;another space monkey;
[ Forced Evolution Studios ]


Vash says: eat more donuts, play more games!

Edited by - eldee on January 16, 2002 8:25:01 AM

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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by SA-Magic
What about general work experience with games? Any more suggestions I could consider??


Try getting into some beta tests, perhaps.

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