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SilverEagle

How many polys ?

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Hi, We are starting a new project now, in the world of 3D. We are completly aware that we will need a lot of time to learn the API and the limitations of the actual hardware. However, we''d also like to start all at the same time (this is, programmers and graphicians). For this, I need some figures about the current state of the art in 3D, to provide the 3d modelers. The questions are: 1. How many polys (aprox. just a figure) can you use with a geforce 3 / P4 2000 Mhz (let''s say gouraud / phong triple-textured polys ? 2. How many polys should be used in the characters of the game ? (5000, 10000, more ?) 3. What is the current limitation on speed (portal/BSP/other space techniques due to large amount of polys, in screen polys (fillrate), geometry calculus or other (AI algos, sound calculation, etc) ? Any light on this would be great. - Juancho

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All three depend on how good your programming skills are

I don''t know the quoted rates for the GeForce 3, check the nvidea web-site, they''re bloody high but you won''t get anywhere near them in a real game.

Your character poly-counts sound way to high if you want to have more than a couple on screen at once. For example, the high LOD Quake 3 models have about 600 polys.

In my experience the major limitations on ''speed'' will be the quality of your culling system, for both rendering and collision detection. Basically this comes down to what sort of database you have for your scene. BSP trees are great for collsion detection, but can be slow for rendering. You will almost certainly need some sort of occlusion culling, because overdraw is the big speed killer.

I would tell the artists to use as few polys as possible. Once you have some code working and it''s fast then if your artists are any good they can always go back and add more detail later.

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First, thank you for your help. What I''d need would be more concrete figures based on experience. If you check the nvidia web site, they say you should be able to render 30.000.000 triangles per second, and that on an ''old'' geForce 2

The artists need a figure to truly work on the models.. Just ''use as few as possible'' won''t do (you know, they always want to know how many, if they are limited

600 polys for the characters.. Well, that''s way below what I expected (is for this that I needed the numbers).. I read somewhere that the new version of Tomb Raider will use at least 5000 polys for the character. That''s a *lot* of polys then..


Regards,

- Juancho

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Claimed poly rates on PC cards are usually nonsense when it comes to an actual game with lighting, texturing, transformations, AI etc.
50,000 polys max per frame on a 60fps game is what I reckon personally.
On a Geforce 2, PIII, around half that.
On a TNT2, as many ppl still have - well dont ask...

I think you''ll find next-gen console games are getting much higher poly throughput, because of their custom architecture, than PCs.
But if anyone can prove higher poly rates I want to see it!

A

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Andy is talking sense. 30 mil triangles per second is 500,000 tris per frame (at 60fps). This is ridiculous. You simply cannot generate the vertex data that quickly in real time.

In terms of concrete figures:

I think Quake 3 Arena generally draws between 2000 and 5000 tris per frame for static geometry (depending on the level and which node your in) though a lot of this is overdraw. Add another couple of thousand for entities. Then add 600 polys for each player (though the further away the player is the less poly''s are used, and the same applies for curved surfaces). I think your looking at around 10,000 poly''s per frame for the entire scene, yes *everything*

Quake 3 Arena runs between 30 - 50 fps a second on my PII 450 with a GeForce2 MX.

Quake 3 was written by John Carmack. You are not John Carmack. Think carefully about how many poly''s you really need. After all, it''s gameplay that''s important. In my opinion good texturing has a far greater effect than poly count on the final percieved quality of the render. But that''s just me

Galgiel.

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quote:
Original post by AndyM
50,000 polys max per frame on a 60fps game is what I reckon personally.



This number is after texturing, lighting, game calculations, etc.?

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quote:
Original post by Someone1
[quote]Original post by AndyM
50,000 polys max per frame on a 60fps game is what I reckon personally.



This number is after texturing, lighting, game calculations, etc.?


Yes, its just a guesstimate though...
And only on a geforce3 super-machine, which I don''t have


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Guest Anonymous Poster
Hmm. You can get more out of your machine. By highly optimizing your engine and fine tuning every aspect of your vertex transfer pipeline, figures are a bit higher than that.

On my engine, I get around 150,000 tris/frame at 50FPS on an actual game scene. On a GeForce2 GTS, AMD 1.2GHz. Using all the tricks, VARs, fencing, AGP DMA, cache optimizations and handoptimized ASM on some parts.

- AH

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Using my Radeon32 DDR I can attain 4M triple textured, vertexlit tris / sec. A GF2 could probably do that too, if you sacrifice a texturestage.

Anyway, make your engine scalable and you don''t have to worry about it.




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