• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

gamesmaster2

Is it far now Papa Smurf

8 posts in this topic

I just got started learning C++.I know that each person is different but just endulge me and give me a ball park figure.How long am I looking at before I can even attempt my first game.I''d say I started about 2 months ago and just getting to functions which from my previous post is kicking my ass because I can''t think of a instance to use it right now.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I made my first text based game within 2 months of programming. The real question is what KIND of game do you want to make because I''m sure you could easily make a game called "Guess The Number"

Time also depends on how much time you put into programming. The more time you put into learning, the quicker you will be to make a game.

Invader X
Invader''s Realm
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Personally I say start now, make it a project and learn while making it. Don''t worry if it is bad or small, just start working. Its the best way to learn.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Aye, definately you could probably start making games now, like the Guess the number game Invader X suggested - though you might not necessarily consider them real games.

Personally I would suggest you work on a text adventure game, if you know what that is (and thats your kind of thing). I've used that extensively throughout my learning of C++. It was the first real game I made, and I'm still making new versions of it - even though its been 5 years since I started learning. You will learn alot, and as you begin to figure out new ways of doing things you'll completely scrap your old code and start over again. As an added bonus, if you save your old code - its really neat to go back and look at each different attempt, and you can really see just how much you've progressed.

/*edit:

Talking about functions - I just looked back at my very first version and noticed it only had one function - main(). My current version has hundreds of functions... they're definately useful.

*/

Edited by - laotzu on January 21, 2002 12:53:05 AM
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It is only natural to start coding procedurally and transition to a more modularized version. What really gets fun is when you start learning how to use classes with inheritance!!!
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks everyone.It was really getting to me.When you say a text adventure game do you mean like a rpg.I always wanted to do one.But do you think that would be too far out of my reach for a first time project??
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
More like a ''Choose your own adventure'' story. Or at least, that was mine way back when I was programming in BASIC.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would say that a text adventure IS to advanced to begin with. But maybe I'm wrong.

I would start leaning in this order:

1. basic C/C++

2. Very basic win32 (windows programming)

3. DirectDraw / SDL / Allegro (or some other graphics API)

4. Simple game like Pacman using the above and of course GameDev.

Edited by - granat on January 23, 2002 5:54:19 AM
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would certainly do a few text games before any win32 stuff. The win32 would probably confuse the * out of you. See, with text games you can get a feel for things like functions and classes, and various data types - without having to worry about setting up windows and drawing stuff to them and what not. About the text adventure - it certainly doesn''t have to be very advanced, or even a fun game.

My first version was one function, and used (gag) gotos - all you could do was walk around a couple rooms.

Second version, I think I used a couple of structs and some functions. Now you could walk around and pick up and drop stuff.

Third version, ahh.. the discovery of classes!

etc..

You see, it doesn''t have to do a whole lot - but it does do a great job of introducing you to what your learning (at least in my opinion it did)..

Anyways, best of luck to you
-lao

(ps.1 - yes I did mean rpg)
(ps.2 - I don''t think if you keep your aim low it''ll be to advanced - plus if you run into difficulties, thats what the gamedev forums are for)
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites