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Queasy

GDC or E3

11 posts in this topic

I have a choice of going to either one of these conferences (GDC or E3). Which would be the best place for networking and possibly finding internship or a job? I figure it would be GDC. Thanks.
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Definitely GDC. They have a job fair there. E3 is thrown mainly to sell games to the big boys and is not there for hiring employees.
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Which one is the one to go to for investment capital? Where will the publishers and those looking for ideas be? Interesting question.

Kressilac
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I might make it. Depends on this months cash flow. I hate startups and cash flow but I love being part of the startup. Wish I could have a tun of money and be a startup. Here''s to dreaming.

Derek
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GigaPass for GDC is about $1400. They have less expensive "passes", but I forget what they are. Check:
http://www.gdconf.com

I''m going to GDC. GDC seems more along the lines of what I want/need right now, but E3 looks to be a lot of fun too. I would attend E3 if I could afford to hit 2 big conferences this year. Maybe next year I can make it to both.

DavidRM
Samu Games
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There is a starter pass for only $125. Get a lot of things, but i''m sure you don''t get as many lectures and things like that.

~WarDekar
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Several of my Colorado Game Developers friends are going, and they strongly suggest that anyone concerned about the price attempt to get in free by doing volunteer work. Obviously it''s too late for that now, but it''s something to consider...

-fel
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GDC is definitely the event for investment capital/publishers. But be aware: most publishers expect you to make appointments with them in advance since their people will only usually be in for one or two days of the conference and they will be in non-stop meetings. You will not find publishers by walking the floor.

Also be aware that I have found paying the extra 600$ or so for the talks is a bit expensive; many of the talks are more geared for beginners. If you are an experienced game developer you will probably not get much out of them (my algorithms guy kept coming out of the theory ones telling me "man what a waste of time"). Some of the stuff is also misleading; we were under the impression that the MRM talk last year was going to go over Hoppes MRM article; it instead turned out to be an hour of listening to people trying to sell us a 6000$ library implementing the algorithm.

E3 is loads of fun. If you have never been I strongly recommend going; it will blow you away the first time you see it. It is really hard to comprehend the flash/money thrown into that thing (and the cute models :-) )...

But...E3 is only good for spying on new games and technology. It''s main purpose is for publishers to sell X # copies of their game to big retailers...



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