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.NET and Its effect on Game Development

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Visual Studio.NET, the supposodly great new Visual Studio Version from the infamous Microsoft. Has turned many heads with its new "language independence", meaning that any given language *can* compile into the same machine code, either at install time or build time. Given that, C/C++ *may* not have a significant advantage over other languages, like C# or Java. Will game development houses turn to these other languages, especially C#, and gain a little in organization, or will they keep with tradition and stay with C/C++? All comments accepted.

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quote:
Original post by Kylotan
Few C++ programmers think that C# offers any improvement over C++.

Change that to "Few C++ game programmers..." and I''ll agree with you. Reception is generally positive in less niche-oriented disciplines.



Once there was a time when all people believed in God and the church ruled. This time is called the Dark Ages.

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Also remember that this is the same type of people that believed anything more high level than assembler was unsuitable for games until Carmack proved them wrong.

Once there was a time when all people believed in God and the church ruled. This time is called the Dark Ages.

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quote:

Also remember that this is the same type of people that believed anything more high level than assembler was unsuitable for games until Carmack proved them wrong.



I don''t think it was Carmack as much as advances in hardware that made assembly less relevant. Carmack would still be using assembly is that''s what it took.

Take care,
Bill

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Have you ever tried to do COM object development in C++?
How about MVC type GUI development?
Or CGI and ISAPI filter development?

These things are all stuff I have to do at work and they are very time consuming and difficult and error prone.
C#, WebForms and the new GUI controls are going to make this much much easier and cleaner.

I don''t think it will be used in games but I want to lean the new GUI constructs for writing utilities and even game front ends.

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I don`t have any problem with C# or interpreted language for that matters. The only issue for me is portability. I like when stuff runs on Linux, Windows, Mac and consoles! Even though .NET byte code is open, I haven`t seen anybody trying to make it run on other platform yet. Supposedly, Microsoft is writing a Mac .NET.

One thing I always wanted to do is use Java or Python for a script language and have a little C++ kernel, but the fact that there are no Python or Java implementation on consoles turn me off a bit(because I need console support). It is much simpler to port your own code than someone else`s.

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quote:
Original post by Gorg
I Even though .NET byte code is open, I haven`t seen anybody trying to make it run on other platform yet.


You should go here then: www.go-mono.org. There are a couple of other projects too - Portable.NET comes to mind, but I''m too lazy to find an URL for you.
quote:

Supposedly, Microsoft is writing a Mac .NET.


No, MS has promised a "Shared Source"-implementation of .NET for FreeBSD.




Once there was a time when all people believed in God and the church ruled. This time is called the Dark Ages.

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quote:

I like when stuff runs on Linux, Windows, Mac and consoles!



Why? For the most part, making something cross-platform means you drop features and add overhead, without really addressing compatability concerns.

Take care,
Bill

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