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SlipperyPig

Has anyone made a racing sim?

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Seems to me many many commercial racing games have all of these physics features and more. Have you seen Project Gotham Racing for Xbox, for example, which actually simulates body damage to cars (though the damage is probably just a collection of static meshes that are selected using logic)? Or most any other recent racing game. I imagine even the arcade "fun" games like Crazy Taxi have all these fundamental elements of racing physics..

Graham Rhodes
Senior Scientist
Applied Research Associates, Inc.

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I''m sorry I should have clarified my post, I meaant has anyone submitted a racing game _to this site_. It seems to me that the majority of people who like programming, or even computers, dont like racing games, they want to program a role playing game, or maybe just a platform game because they are trying to learn how to write games.

I only really like racing games I dont know why, maybe because I''m a revv-head at heart, and I''ve been coming up with ideas that involve cars NOT racing which hasnt really been looked at much in computer games, and I think it could be an audience for it.

At the moment I''ve been gathering physics information on race physics and it seems there''s a dozen different ways you can go about it. If anyone wants to get together and work on this I''d be happy to share my ideas.

Paul

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My guess is that it isn''t "not liking" the games, it is programming the games. You can make a simple one like you said, but most people here don''t want to be part of the norm and be like everyone else. They want to be better than that. But that includes more work, and placing alot of mechanics into a simulator is alot harder than an RPG, FPS or a card game - unless the FPS has driving, flying and so on, or atleast slippery ground to fall over on.

PS - I have been working on a simple tute for simple mechanics, currently on a 4 wheel vehicle (ie a car). my email should be in here somewhere.



Beer - the love catalyst
good ol'' homepage

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There have been a few posts/queries to this forum from people making driving games of various types. I''ve seen a couple of demos, but nothing will real, working physics. There have definitely been people *interested* in the physics of racing. For example, the recent thread:

http://www.gamedev.net/community/forums/topic.asp?topic_id=76696

discusses some aspects of vehicle physics. More interesting is:

http://www.gamedev.net/community/forums/topic.asp?topic_id=77940
http://www.gamedev.net/community/forums/topic.asp?topic_id=76945

and

http://www.gamedev.net/community/forums/topic.asp?topic_id=73868

I know that doesn''t really answer your specific question, and you may have already seen these threads. But it is all the info I can really provide.

Graham Rhodes
Senior Scientist
Applied Research Associates, Inc.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
though this is kinda off the original topic..

quote:
Original post by grhodes_at_work
I imagine even the arcade "fun" games like Crazy Taxi have all these fundamental elements of racing physics..


you are absolutely right. different game, but definitely arcade..the San Franciso Rush driving model (which uses a 4 point driving model with unnaturally high values forced into it) was originally a police trainer back in the mid eighties. the police trainer was then massaged into Hard Drivin (also mid eighties) and then again into SF Rush. over the course of SF Rush new ideas were incorporated into the engine..for instance the arcade version of Rush 2049 took a new tire turning approach, which is used in real life, where the inside tire turns slightly more than the outside tire to enable better traction.

its amazing that such slight changes to "real physics" can give such an unreal experience.

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Graham, I think I have read most of them... there may be one or two I havent, I''ll have a look.

I have read an article on the arcade game Hard Drivin'', it was a very nice machine for it''s time. I believe a bit of parallel processing was being done, with shared memory. I think I read it was about the equivelant of a Pentium 300 but dont quote me. I dont think I have played it on a console that had anywhere close to the physics that was used in the arcade version.

I agree, the slightest amount of more realism to the physics makes the gameplay a lot more fun. That is where a lot of commercial racing games went wrong I think. They had a deadline and they didnt put enough time into the controls and the physics. For eg Gran Turismo (sorry if I cant speel ) bored me to death almost. It didnt seem to have the depth of physics that even Need For Speed 1 had.

Need For Speed 1 was a classic IMO. The main drawbacks in it though were that the cars were confined to the track, with invisible barriers a few feet from either side of the track. I recently hacked it so that you could go offroad, and it made a MUCH more playable game, although I didnt go any further with it because each track had to be painstakingly edited. Also, the game engine only raised the car off the ground as high as the road at that particular point, so any offroad sections that were a different height to the road would had to have to been sectioned off so you couldnt drive on them, not too much of a loss really.

It is interesting to see when you go offroad in NFS and you hit trees they get flattened on the ground and make a slight thump noise. This was probably because the only objects that you could actually hit in the unhacked game were signs. Well it was fun anyway flattening 10 palm trees sideways. The only other bad point I could give NFS was that the rendering engine only rendered in the forward pointing direction... very nasty, but still fast even on a P100.

Which is why it surprises me that someone hasn''t made a racing game an ongoing project. Why cant independant programmers get together and work on a freeware Motor City stlye game? (I havent actually seen Motor City).

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Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by SlipperyPig
I dont think I have played it on a console that had anywhere close to the physics that was used in the arcade version.


yeah we had a seriously optimized and in some places hacked-apart
driving model for the console versions of Rush. we couldnt add
the little bells and whistles the arcade guys were adding to the engine, cause we needed to run the model up to 4 times a frame (the drone cars ran through the model as well, just not every frame) on the n64''s 99mhz processor..

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I''m also currently working on a racing sim, and have very detailed racing physics in BASIC which I''d be happy to share with you if you agree to share any physics code you caome up with???

What do you say?


Lazarus404

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Ok but I dont have much at all. Just top view of a box for the car. I was trying to make at least friction and I got something like it. What have you got?

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