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Hi, first post, about Intel and AMD cpu

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Hi all, this is my first post! First, a question: How does a c/c++ programmer use such things as MMX, or write specific code to great the best performance out of, say an Intel or an AMD cpu? Is this something that can only happen at the ASM level or do graphics APIs like opengl and directx ‘automatically’ support them? Great website and community here by the way. I’ve always had an interest in programming, since a had a BBC with basic, then the Amiga and AMOS (cough), then I thought it’s about time I learnt a ‘real’ programming language. I’ve been learning c and c++, on and off, through recommended books for about a year now. It’s time I sat down and wrote something big-ish… I may enter the physics compo, since I love the maths/physics side of programming. I’ve worked through NeHe opengl tuts which are great, though I haven’t bought a book on opengl yet. Has anyone here messed around with the Quake2 source code? I’ve done a couple of the online tuts, like add a weapon but that’s about it

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In order to get something out of a particular CPU''s abilities (MMX, SIMD, 3DNow etc...) you''ll have to learn assembly language up to the point at which you''ll be able to understand programming manuals provided by CPU manufacturers. All the details and instructions for accessing hardware such as MMX are described in those manuals. Graphics APIs don''t really have much support for this stuff. In fact the only thing that is actually supported by graphics APIs is nVidia''s nfiniteFX engine, although I doubt that this "support" can give you the possibilities which you can get out of direct access to nvidia''s GPU. If you''re really serious about programming I''d suggest you learn ASM. Read the Art of Assembly 16-bit/DOS version, then you''ll be a real guru. Here''s the link...

http://webster.cs.ucr.edu/Page_asm/ArtofAssembly/zips/PDFAOA.ZIP

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