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OpenGL and Direct3D - Both or just one?

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Hi, this is not a post comparing the merits of OpenGL with Direct3D, but rather, a simple question - if I am serious (dead serious?) about programming in the game industry, shall I just learn Direct3D or OpenGL, or shall I learn both? Thanks in advance!

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If you''re really serious about programming learn one graphics API and assembly language.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
If you are serious about going in the game industry, you should learn both, since both are widely used on the game sector. If you want to go in the professional simulation/visualization industry, then OpenGL is important, and you can forget about D3D.

- AH

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Well, start with opengl, and if you really need to, learn Microshit DirectX after. OpenGL is more widely used and that is : OpenGL is cross plaform, MacOSx, Playstation2, Linux... Opengl is professional easy to learn API (remember, Silicon Graphic developed it) where as Microsoft just wants money, that''s all they care about.
OpenGL. ORG (non profit organization) Microshit. COM (Commercial)

Microsoft screw everyone. If you look just a little bit into what they do, it is quite discusting. They are trying to take over the game market, and if everyone follows like sheeps, we''ll end up with shity game, miroshit controlled and that crashes every 5 min as a Microshit FEATURE.

Anyway, seriously, I started with D3D, and they make the simplest thing look very complex. I pick up OpenGL this summer and I can create a decent looking game 6 month later. Why go with a more complicated API, when 3D is already pretty complex by itself...

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Guest Anonymous Poster
AP, although I agree with you on the M$ point, if he is serious about going into the game development industry, he will have to learn DX, and most probably also D3D. There is no way around that. Even, if he worked for a company like IDSoft, with an ''OpenGL-only'' policy, he still needs to know DirectX.

If you want to totally dump DX, then you''ll have to go into the (SGI/Sun/HP + Unix dominated) professional non-game related sector.

- AH

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Bias. It''s so charming.

Ignore all the anti-Microsoft propaganda; DirectX has matured into a very good API, and it''s moved onto console via XBox (of course, that''s the only console it''s likely to move to). OpenGL is a very useful skill, especially since (being non-proprietary) it is available on several platforms (in various stages of standards adherance and completeness). In the final analysis, it''s good to know both, but even better to be sufficiently grounded in the principles behind the APIs. You may be called upon to implement one of your own...

As for Microsoft being a money grubbing organization, contrasted with the "non-profit purity" of OpenGL, please! This is business and money is a good thing - the lifeblood of business. The OpenGL ARB takes so long to decide on things because of the conflicting business interests of its members, a problem DirectX doesn''t have. The ARB is also still highly influenced by the leanings of SGI (who own IrisGL, on which OpenGL is based). Get your facts straight before spouting off at the mouth.

Yes, I like Microsoft (they''re one of my favorite companies) and I would love to work there.

[ GDNet Start Here | GDNet Search Tool | GDNet FAQ | MS RTFM [MSDN] | SGI STL Docs | Google! ]
Thanks to Kylotan for the idea!

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quote:
Original post by Oluseyi
The OpenGL ARB takes so long to decide on things because of the conflicting business interests of its members, a problem DirectX doesn''t have.

Yeah, DirectX takes a long time to evolve for completely different reasons ! The API''s really have become the bottleneck, it''s no longer the hardware (to paraphrase 3DLabs in its OpenGL 2.0 proposal; which, if it is accepted, will again out distance the hardware, heh).

Threads like this are kind of useless. It''s less useless than the "vs" variation, but it still could easily be subplanted by a little research with a friendly search engine.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
> Yes, I like Microsoft (they''re one of my favorite companies) and I would love to work there

As you said: ''Bias. It''s so charming''

I hate Microsoft. I would love to see them eradicated from this planet. Each one his preferences.

BTW: I was not the other AP that went OT.

- AH

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Well in my personal opinion ( which I doubt many of you care about ), it is necessary to learn both API''s if you want to get into the graphics programming industry. Although I am a dedicated Linux user, if you are going to work for somebody that wants to use DirectX, then you better learn DirectX. If you are relatively new to both the API''s, I would recommend learning OpenGL first as it is simpler to learn.

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Both API''s have very similar functionality and similar functions. If you learn one well, then learning the other will be relatively simple. If you''re a beginner Direct X can be a little more difficult to set up than Open GL using GLUT, but it compensates by providing some additional functionality, like the matrix and vector classes, and functions to load meshes and textures from files, to make life easier.

OpenGL might be easier to learn if you don''t have a book, because there seem to be more tutorials available online. In the long run it doesn''t really matter which on you start with -- just choose one and stick with it. You should really learn to be comfortable with using both eventually.

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