Jump to content
  • Advertisement

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

david_williams

CSG in level editors

This topic is 5952 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hi, I''m working on a level editor for my 3D engine, and am wondering when the CSG should be performed. As I see it there are two options: 1) Perform the CSG within the editor, when the user adds or removes brushes. Could this be time consuming and difficult to undo? 2) Perform CSG after the level has been created, using a seperate program which also does things like light maps. This would mean that during editing some kind of rendering trick would need to be used to make the scene look CSG''d, maybe usoing the stencil buffer or something? How do ''proper'' editors, such as UnrealEd and Worldcraft do it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Guest Anonymous Poster
Well, in Worldcraft if two surfaces overlap, it flickers a little. This isn''t really a problem since surfaces rarely overlap. Anyway, in Quakes the CSG is calculated like in case #2.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you like to see how it looks like to have csg in editor the then goto my website and download the editor. I''ve just put in frustum projection(working on culling now) so you can see how it looks to have visible camera in 2D views.

ForgEd3D world editor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi,

Now, I don''t want to sound like I''m dissing writing a level editor, I just want to say that I also spent a lot of time working on a level editor before.

Eventually, I decided it was much easier and productive to use UnrealEd and import the level data into my engine. There are a lot of advantages. If you export the level info from UnrealEd (as opposed to simply saving it in it''s native format), then you get an ASCII file with all the simple, unmodified primitives you placed in the level initially. This allows you to do with that data whatever you want – create a BSP map, create a portal map (which is what I did), etc.

A huge advantage is that you get a quality level editor without effort, which supports advanced features. Also, it’s then easy to export any of the existing Unreal levels to test in your engine. You can’t beat that!

Now of course there is some value in doing the level editor yourself, if you like doing it specifically, but I got frustrated because I could not spend the time I wanted on my engine, instead I spent it trying to make the level editor do simple things that UnrealEd does with it’s eyes closed.

It’s just a thought, as many people prefer doing it themselves, but just thought you needed to know about the alternatives.

SS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

Participate in the game development conversation and more when you create an account on GameDev.net!

Sign me up!