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Viper35

Beginner info

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I''ve recently read the post EVERYBODY READ THIS. I was wondering than if I, a complete beginner, (just started learning C++ a month ago) should start with assembly. It''s not like I''m very far in C++ so it wouldn''t have been a huge waste of time. Also, I want to be a good solid programmer and am in no rush to create any big game. In addition, I looked up a compiler for assembly on amazon, and couldn''t find anything. Any idea where I could get one should I choose assembly first. Thanks, A.

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Well personally I think assembly is junk compared to C++, but that''s just my oppinion

Keep up with C++, read books untill your eyes starts to bleed and don''t even try to make a game untill you have a good feel how it works.. Then I would recommend the interactive game tutorial here at GDnet as a start, although it''s quiet there now it was the place I "took my first steps"..

Good luck! (should I say: "You''ll need it"? )

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You should keep in mind that the author of that post was specifically targeting LAZY and IGNORANT programmers, not necessarily non-assembly programmers..that thread kind of went in the wrong direction with the language arguments; the point(I thought)was supposed to be about UNDERSTANDING..

It''s more important that you understand HOW a computer actually works at a low-level than to start programming at a low level..you can write good or bad code in either language, what''s important is that you understand what the cpu is actually doing with your instructions..

If you know the painful details of everything the processor has to do to carry out even the most mundane tasks you''ll be able to structure your c++ code to take advantage of that just as well as with any other language..

"Like all good things, it starts with a monkey.."

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learning assembly takes much time and devotion. if your a newbie, then, it may not be necessary to make a complete study of asm. all you need to understand are the concepts -learn about push, pop, cmp, jmp, jz, add... etc... learn about memory and how programs work. you can probably learn about how assembly works in a few days or weeks. after that, study c++, and try to make relations to asm, if your in mvc++, look at the disasm.

although learning asm may be exciting, it may not be too fulfilling since you wont be able to program any large programs in it, and its very easy to lay waste to your system/program.

there are tons of sites about assembly. try searching google for asm and art of asm

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From what I understand ASM is one of those things that once you get you''ll find it very easy, its just getting it to click thats hard. Anyways I''m still learning it myself so maybe I''m wrong...

"A computer lets you make more mistakes faster than any invention in human history - with the possible exceptions of handguns and tequila."
-Mitch Ratliffe

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I agree with most of you. Learning ASM is not a nessacary thing - but it does help understand things better. If you want to be a realy good programmer - try taking a college course in Logic and Critical Thinking. Not computer related, but it gets your mind onto the proper tracks. Once you understand logic - all the rest is water under the bridge.

This is something I have noticed in my classes. All the comp classes at my college teach around Java. Lots of people who take these classes have NEVER programmed in their lives and get TOTALY confused because Java hides so much that they have NO idea what is going on. They never will catch on either, unless they start to learn the basics of what happens under the hood.

A car mechanic does not need to know exactly how the computer in a new fuel injection system functions - but he will be a better mechanic if he has a rough idea...

Landsknecht

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I think you should learn C first, then C++. Procedural and object-oriented concepts are way more important than assembly, unless you really want to work on the hardware/driver level. When you know those two, I think learning assembly will be a lot easier. Beware also that an assembly language is directly associated with the kind of CPU you are working on. That is, your Standard C++ code will run on apple and pc, but your x86 ASM won't be of any use on a Apple G3, for instance.


Etienne Begin,
Computer Science student


Edited by - ET on February 8, 2002 6:45:50 PM

Edited by - ET on February 8, 2002 6:46:14 PM

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