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code_fx

which language is better

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Is C++ a good language for game developement... and if it is why is that most tutorials that are for C++ have as much C as any thing else... and Which is better to learn and operate with an understanging of the envirnment around you: C or C++... I recently picked up "Windows game programming for dummies" and learned that most of the programming is comleted in C and I dont have a firm understanding of C... From my knowledge the game programming for gurus is more sutiable for my needs... speaking of which can any one recommened a good intro book for game programming in c++ and another book thats an intro for graphic( out of curiousity would that be book on OpenGL or Directx)
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C and C++ are pretty much the same thing. If you learn one then learning the other will be VERY trivial. If you know C++ and have a book that uses C, then you shouldn''t have a problem.

If you know C and have a book that has C++, then you should be able to easily learn the few concepts that C++ has that C doesn''t.
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c++ should be used over c...
C++ is object oriented, which means it can be very easy to model real world objects -this is a good thing for game programming.

you should pick up books by andre lamothe
he writes and edits a series, some of the books in it are:
(i think these are the right names)

tips and tricks of the windows game programming gurus.
the zen of direct3d game programming

there are alot more... but in general, if you see andre lamothe''s name somewhere, then the book is probably worth buying.
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EvilCrap: You say "C++ should be used over C", but that''s not necessarily true. Andre Lamothe uses C in his books. In TOTWGPG, he only uses a little bit of C++. Quake 3 was made with C.
Using C or C++ is personal preference. Yeah, C++ is object oriented, but that doesn''t mean someone can''t do cool stuff in C. I know the basic and intermediate stuff of C++, but I still prefer C.
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Each language has its pros and cons, and it mainly depends on what you are trying to accomplish and what platform. People often tend to consider the language they use as the "better" language. This past tuesday I had a another job intereview with a company, not a game programming company, though. One of the persons that was interviewing me was a java programmer. He proclaimed that java will replace C++ soon because of its portability and use for multimedia. He even said that 'C' was not even that usefull anymore. The best bet is just learn more languages. The more tools you have for the job the better.:-)




-----------------------------
"There are ones that say they can and there are those who actually do."

"...u can not learn programming in a class, you have to learn it on your own."





Edited by - cMADsc on February 8, 2002 12:06:55 PM
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I still don''t understand the difference between C and C++...
What the hells the big deal?
People should learn C++ and use it...
If I were to make a c++ program, but not use any oop, would it be C or C++? If I were to use keywords like NEW and DELETE, that would make it c++, no? But why would you want to use malloc() when NEW is so much easier and safer?
I''m still puzzled over this (and I have a feeling I''m going to be flamed for some reason or another...)

"I''ve learned something today: It doesn''t matter if you''re white, or if you''re black...the only color that REALLY matters is green"
-Peter Griffin
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If you know C++, you have two options. The first is "C++ as a better C." You structure your code in the same way you would C code; you just have a few extra safety features like new instead of malloc, and friendlier struct definition.

Your second option is to use C++ as an entirely seperate language. That is, approach program design from an OO standpoint.

OO design is an excellent way to design large programs. However, for the small examples you most often see in books, its frequently more trouble than its worth. That''s why you probably see a lot of "C++ as a better C" code.

What''s better, "C++ as a better C" or OO C++? That depends on the size and nature of the project you''re working on, as well as personal preference. However, I see little to no reason to choose C over "C++ as a better C."
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Just becouse you program in C++ does not mean you program in OOP style. This is a very important difference. Learn to program OOP in C++, and you programming will be eaiser read, write and debug.
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why not just learn good programming techniques and that way you can distinguish which language is appropriate for the job? you, don''t write BIOS''s in C++, idiots. you guys use buzz words, like it''s the ten commandments.

To the vast majority of mankind, nothing is more agreeable than to escape the need for mental exertion... To most people, nothing is more troublesome than the effort of thinking.
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