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Andrew Nguyen

Modular Math

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I know that modular math is relevant to cryptography and the Lucas-Lehmer test for mersenne primes, but... particle systems? Andrew, no offence, but do you know what modular maths is?

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Mathworl.wolfram.com has a truly facinating page on modular functions.
It would be even more facinating if I knew what he was actually telling me.It seems to have some interesting properties, but...

Andrew, for the benifit of the rest of us: what is modular math, and what does it do to data ?


The page I`m referring to is:
http://mathworld.wolfram.com/ModularForm.html



Bugle4d

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I''ve been reading "Fermat''s Enigma" by Simon Singh over the past few days, and modular forms are covered to a very, very small degree just to get the basic idea of what they are about.

what i''ve picked up that i remember:

--Modular forms are extremely symmetric, more symmetric than a more common "shape" that has rotational and reflectional symmetry, for example. Mod forms are infinitely symmetric since they also posess translational symmetry.

--It is impossible to visually describe a modular form, as the two axes that describe it are complex and have both real and imaginary parts...yielding four dimensional space (hyperbolic space).

That''s about all I remember

Martin
http://lpsoftware.cfxweb.net

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Talking of hyperbolic space... you can crochet hyperbolic surfaces! No really, you can! I read a recent article in New Scientist describing one mathematicians work at understanding and representing hyperbolic surfaces. For those that aren''t too sure what a hyperbolic surface looks like... each point on a hyperbolic plane looks like a riding saddle (you know, for horses!)

Apparently you can crochet a Klein bottle beenie! There''s also a glass blower that blew a Klein Stein! It''s a beer stein with no inside that holds beer! The article appeared within the last month or so I recall, so check out New Scientist for more details!


Cheers,

Timkin

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