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acw83

VC++ .NET

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First, let me state that I read the other thread on VC++ .NET. My question revolves more around the features offered. Could someone give me a specific example of a .NET program? Also, what is "Managed C++?" How does these fit in with game programming? I just can''t seem to justify buying the standard edition without knowing what these new features are. Thanks.

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First of all: VC++.NET isnt all about .NET programming. The C++ compiler is the only remaining in the VS suite that can still emit native x86 code. This is what most of the developers on these forums will use.
Managed C++ is a set of extensions to the core C++ language to enable it to work with .NET. .NET is(among other things) a huge set of classes for various purposes - GUI programming, Web-apps, XML, SOAP, sockets etc...
A sample MC++ Hello World looks like this:
  
#using <mscorlib.dll>

using namespace System;


int main(void)
{

Console::WriteLine(S"Hello World");
return 0;
}

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Also, if I get VS.NET, will I get the x86 C++ compiler with, so I can create standard Win32 programs?

Also, you say that C++ is the only one to have an x86 compiler, does that mean that C# cannot be used to create standard x86 programs?

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quote:
Original post by python_regious
Also, if I get VS.NET, will I get the x86 C++ compiler with, so I can create standard Win32 programs?


Yes.
quote:

Also, you say that C++ is the only one to have an x86 compiler, does that mean that C# cannot be used to create standard x86 programs?


The C#, JScript.NET and VB.NET compilers only emit MSIL code - no native x86.

Magmai: This has been pointed out over and over - The only limitations on MC++ is in your managed interface. This is unavoidable in any multilanguage interop scenario. Code that isnt exposed as a .NET class can be written any way you want.

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Thanks for the help, I''ve decided to make the purchase. However, I have one last question: The feature set for VC++.NET Standard includes a compiler for C#... Does that mean I can use VC++.NET to code C#? If so, why would anyone pay $99 for VC#.NET Standard?

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I noticed that too - VC# Std contains the C++ and VB.NET compilers, VC++ Std contains C# and VB.NET compilers and VB.NET Std contains C# and C++ compilers.
I would assume there is a difference in the level of IDE integration, debugging, Intellisense and stuff like that. VC++ Std does lack the Windows Forms designer, though.

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Its a tool you have in VC# and VB.NET to design forms and dialogs visually instead of through code. There have been some mixed signals from MS about providing it for MC++ as well; I wouldnt be surprised if it appeared in VC++7.1 or something like that.

The world holds two classes of men -- intelligent men without religion, and religious men without intelligence. Abu''l-Ala-Al-Ma''arri (973-1057; Syrian poet)

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Guest Anonymous Poster
This is just a little off-topic, but does anyone know what the difference is feature-wise between the standalone VC++.NET standard edition and the version that is included in Visual Studio.NET professional?

I''m assuming it''s slightly limited as past "standard" editions of VS products were, but I can''t find any information to verify it.

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The compiler in standard does not optimize. Also certain things useful mainly for large companies come with Professional such as SourceSafe. Hope that helps.

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These links should be of interest: http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/vcedit/html/vcgrfvisualcppstandardeditionfeatures.asp and http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/vsintro7/html/vxoriVisualStudioEditions.asp
You might want to go for the AE of VS.NET though, if you are an accredited student.



The world holds two classes of men -- intelligent men without religion, and religious men without intelligence. Abu''l-Ala-Al-Ma''arri (973-1057; Syrian poet)

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Only the Standard versions will come as separate components - there wont be a VC++ Pro, VC# Pro or VB.NET Pro available separately.

The world holds two classes of men -- intelligent men without religion, and religious men without intelligence. Abu''l-Ala-Al-Ma''arri (973-1057; Syrian poet)

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Thanks, that answered my question.

Is the academic edition only available to university students, or can I get it as a high school student? I''m guessing I''m probably out of luck there....

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The "Student" edition MS products are available to students in school or university, teachers or parents of people in school/uni. So pretty much anyone can apply, if not, you probably know someone who can.

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Thankx Arild. Visual C++.NET Standard will be my choice when I decide to get it in the future.

Edem Attiogbe

Edited by - KwamiMatrix on February 20, 2002 1:23:44 AM

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i just got the VS.NET architect edition! haven''t installed it yet.

To the vast majority of mankind, nothing is more agreeable than to escape the need for mental exertion... To most people, nothing is more troublesome than the effort of thinking.

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yeah, it has some extra features for project managers to organize projects. i still haven''t installed it yet. probably in a couple days. need to back up my system first....

To the vast majority of mankind, nothing is more agreeable than to escape the need for mental exertion... To most people, nothing is more troublesome than the effort of thinking.

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