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Dwarf with Axe

Problems with designers - Why aren't they motivated?

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Perhaps motivated isn''t the right word. Well in anycase, here is my thought: Why, oh why, do people want to develop games so much when they have little or no experience? I know some people get paid to develop (sometimes) , but realistically speaking, if you aren''t an artist or coder, your screwed. One thing that has been irritating me a lot is a friend I have. He always has good ideas for games, and helps me develop some, but when it comes to help, he provides nothing. He doesn''t want to read tutorials, and when I ask him why he doesn''t learn something like C/C++, he just says "No one to teach it to me." Then I think to myself: There are a lot of people that I know who think like this. "No one to teach it to me" is the same as saying "I''m too lazy to learn myself, and if no one is going to show me how, then I say forget it." I''m sorry, I am just very disappointed at my friend right now. Do any of you know anyone like this? Thanks for letting me vent. ~Dwarf Complete amatures whose only relevant skill is programming undertake to design games with no further preparation than their own experience as game players. Those who overrate their own understanding undercut their own potential for learning.

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Sorry to say this, but me and the rest of the world are just like that. But the really sad part is I am an artist and I do use some logic for coding... my motivational drive is just not there.

I have friends, like yours, that come up with extraordinary ideas, I do too, but I need someone to work with. I need a purpose, a challenge. Someone that understands and can spark me to work more.... and not stop.

Currently I''m going to school for programming so that I can use my art evenly with my programming skills. (Next, I will need self motivational tapes to keep going.)

I believe if you start an idea/project, finish it. Even if it''s the worst thing you''ve ever created. You never know, someone else may love it!

-rharpe

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I realize the rest of the world is like that. I guess I just wanted to vent about my poor friend. I didn''t mean to offend or start a war with any designers out there (I''m one myself.)

~Dwarf


Complete amatures whose only relevant skill is programming undertake to design games with no further preparation than their own experience as game players. Those who overrate their own understanding undercut their own potential for learning.

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I wonder if there''s an amateur movie-making forum out there somewhere (BlairWitchDev.net, maybe? ) where people log on and post "I''ve got this cool idea for a movie... who wants to make it?"

I think half of the problem is that kids hear the term ''game designer'' and they instantly think "hey, I already design games". There is then this culture of thinking that coming up with the idea is all you need to be a valuable member of the game development community. But in reality, it''s not. It''s not that designers aren''t motivated - it''s that these people aren''t really designers. They just think that they are. Until they actually design something, they''re no more of a designer than a person who''s never written a program is a programmer.

[ MSVC Fixes | STL | SDL | Game AI | Sockets | C++ Faq Lite | Boost ]

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I second that!

__________________________
wootkoos

Rhott Studios
Art Director

email: wootkoos@rhott.com
icq: 78544868
web: www.rhott.com
__________________________

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My problem is that I have the motivation to do one big design project, and only one, at a time. But there are so many fun projects to do, and many of them are so much _shorter_ than a game design project, that it''s always tempting to say "The game can wait until next week - this week I wanna paint." Or sew, or draw, or make a manga, or write a story, or...

Obviously I try not to give in to this, but you have to work with your inspiration.

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rharpe, I don''t think Dwarf meant that the way you took it. He didn''t say you had to code to be of help, he said you have to help. Doing the artwork is fine. Doing nothing is useless.

This has come up a couple of times in the few months I''ve been here. Most of the time people who say "designers" must program really mean they gotta get off their duffs and do SOMETHING to give the game a "physical" form. Even though programming well is hard, it is still a learned skill. Good art/sound skills take base talent for the training and practice to build on, so it makes sense for a newb to start out coding. I think this is what was meant.

I agree, though, that it is a shame some people refuse to try to learn for themselves. I know from experience if you show me something once, you''ll never have to show me again, but if I learn it myself I understand the WHY''S of the task and can better cope with variations of the problem.


ShadeStorm, the Day_Glo Fish

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I agree and disagree. Here''s why:

When you look at a game like Rainbow Six (we all know what this is, right?), what do you see? I see a well-programmed first person shooter with a decent design, good textures, etc. But there''s something missing.

An involved and well-developed story.

Does it really take a rocket scientest to be able to come up with the idea of stopping terrorists? I don''t think so. It''s in this case that you can see the designer doing more than just designing.

But then, take a look at Final Fantasy 7. The artists did a great job with the graphics; you could tell they were talented, skilled, and more than likely, quite expierienced. The music was very well done and definately gave the game some "umpf." The programmers did a great job with it. But what stands out the most in Final Fantasy 7?

The involved and well-developed story ().

Obviosly, the designer devoted alot of his time perfecting just about everything.

Now, I''m not saying that the designer(s) of FF7 weren''t artists or programmers, but if they did nothing else but write the script, design the levels (the designer-ish stuff), would you have thought lesser of them? I wouldn''t. They did a great job, possibly the best job they could.

On the other hand, most people who claim to be designers think that being a designer means you have an idea. There''s alot more to it than that. You need to be devoted (and motivated). These people who "have ideas" tend to fail, mainly because they are usually impatient. They figured they could write their idea on paper, get a programmer and an artist and the game would be done in a week. Then they could go show all of their friends how good of a job they did.

What I''m saying is, I don''t mind if the designer can''t do anything else other than design, but, "by Moradin''s Hammer" (that one''s for you Dwarf ), they could at least do a damn good job of designing!


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Drizzt, I''m assuming you never read the book? Well, I realize that shouldn''t be a requirement but the story was there..it just might have lost something in the presentation.
And on that note, since when are designers and writers the same?

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