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epipactis

DirectX for .NET

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shakazed - maybe not such a good idea to reply at all if you dont have a clue?
epipactis - DirectX 9 will contain a Managed wrapper, letting you use DX from any .NET language. Right now you can either use the existing VB interfaces through COM interop, or write your own wrapper in Managed C++.

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shakazed: However much you don''t believe it, with time a m ajority of people will switch over to .NET, because that is what Microsoft is supporting. As people switch over you will also find each progressive version of DirectX becoming more .NET oriented. I suggest you drop your "C is the best" attitude, because all of the best programmers understand that different languages have their uses. I suggest you try to understand this before bashing languages you have probably never used.

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Actually I study VB for the moment which is moving more and more to .net. Still .Net is a high level programming language and wont be as efficient as C/C++ when it comes to Game Programming.

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shakazed is right. VB.Net is nothing compared to C/C++ for game development. I have writen many programs in VB6 and VB.NET that use directX (and i know the .net framework will get support in directx 9) and they suck compared to anything i have done in c.

As intrest86 said "best programmers understand that different languages have their uses". Yes i agree with that VB.NET (and c#) have there uses in business and network applications. Where C/C++ is usfull for different things one of them being game development.

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I''d suggest the language novices perform some rectal extraction of their heads before spouting any more rubbish.

.NET is a development platform designed to enable seamless development of solutions with multiple languages, and their deployment on any hardware platform that features an implementation of the .NET Framework (the Mono project is an attempt to port .NET to Linux). .NET-enabled languages "compile" to MSIL, an intermediate language which is Just-In-Time (JIT) compiled for the specific hardware and can be tuned during execution for more efficiency. There are currently about 27 .NET-enabled languages, including VB.NET, COBOL.NET, Python.NET, Perl.NET, Managed C++, C# and so on.

.NET is not a programming language (no cookie, shakazed). And Sauron''s empirical evidence of having written far better programs in C is only evidence that he''s a bad VB programmer. Furthermore, if you''ve been paying attention to recent developments in the gaming ind\ustry, you''d have noticed that the current trend is to develop the core engine as low-level as possible and use higher-level languages for rapid development of the game content. In other words, you may soon see games that have significant portions written to the .NET Framework.

We''ll see.

I wanna work for Microsoft!
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Thanks to Kylotan for the idea!

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Vb files are rarely so BIG that its a problem, they almost can fit on floppies. It is the same in all game programming: the code barely takes any space, and the textures/sound and other extras take up the space.

Sauron the Dark: I am guessing that when you did your VB.Net & DirectX programs you were not aware of the extra levels of translation that COM components go through with use of VB.NET. In all reality Vb is a much faster language now, and since C++ didn''t go through many changes (something about C++ programmers not being open to change) the gap has becom much smaller.

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