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Jack Morgan

New to the area.

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Hello everybody, I just enrolled in classes at Bate's Tech. College in Tacoma, WA. While I don't start attending until April, I just wanted to give a shout out to the community. I've purchased a few books on API & DX8 stuff. I was just wondering if you all can recomend any books or web sites that can get me up to speed asap. Thanks in advance! -Jack Morgan Professional at Heart "You think that's air you''re breathing?" -Morpheus Edited by - Jack Morgan on February 17, 2002 10:37:30 PM
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As far as websites, you''re at the best one. For books, have a look in the "Books & Software" section of this site.
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I can give you a list of books, if you can tell me your expierience level.

Meaning:

- What programming language do you intend to use?
- Do you already know this language?
- Do you have any knowledge of the DirectX API yet?
- Do you know physics, or have a good math background?


------------------------------
Simple DirectMedia Layer:

Main Site - (www.libsdl.org)
Cone3D Tutorials- (cone3D.gamedev.net)
GameDev.net''s Tutorials - (Here)

OpenGL:

Main Site - (www.opengl.org)
NeHe Tutorials - (nehe.gamedev.net)
Online Books - (Red Book) (Blue Book)
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Level of Advancement?


Well, I plan to program in C++ eventually.
I have a working knowledge of Visual Basic 6, and I here varible types are pretty much the same through out most languages, so that gives me a little headstart...

My math skills were enough for high school but I doubt they are high compared to anything I would need for programming physical worlds. I''m a bit stumped on the velocity and trajectory things. So a few math books couldn''t hurt, at all.

I really don''t know much about any APIs yet.... I know enough about DirectX to know that I need it to access hardware through windows, but not much more than that.

I''ll be on all night so feel free to respond again.

-Jack Morgan
Professional at Heart
"You think that''s air you''re breathing?"
-Morpheus
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For C++:

"Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days"

For DirectX:

"Beginning Direct3D Game Programming"

For Math:

Gamedev.net Tutorials. I''ve yet to find a good math book for newcomers. Eventually, pick up a copy of Physics for Game Developers. Once you understand basic physics, that is.

And also, welcome to the community! You''ve become a member of the best game development site around. If you ever have any trouble, go to the articles and resources section of this site (on the top, with the links) to find tutorials, etc.

Good luck!

------------------------------
Simple DirectMedia Layer:

Main Site - (www.libsdl.org)
Cone3D Tutorials- (cone3D.gamedev.net)
GameDev.net''s Tutorials - (Here)

OpenGL:

Main Site - (www.opengl.org)
NeHe Tutorials - (nehe.gamedev.net)
Online Books - (Red Book) (Blue Book)
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Thank you Drizzt, you have proven to be a most useful mammal.





-Jack Morgan
Professional at Heart
"You think that''s air you''re breathing?"
-Morpheus
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The "Reference" or "Test Prep" sections of your local bookstore will have "Forgotten ________" type math books. As far as I can recall, I used "Calculus the Easy Way" after getting out of the Army to get my maths up to speed before college and had no problems.

ShadeStorm, the Day_Glo Fish
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quote:
Original post by Jack Morgan

Well, I plan to program in C++ eventually.
I have a working knowledge of Visual Basic 6, and I here varible types are pretty much the same through out most languages, so that gives me a little headstart...



I eventually find the Deitel and Dietel much better than books which have 21 days and 24 hours etc in their title.

quote:
Original post by Jack Morgan
My math skills were enough for high school but I doubt they are high compared to anything I would need for programming physical worlds. I'm a bit stumped on the velocity and trajectory things. So a few math books couldn't hurt, at all.



Well a good maths book is one which you can understand easily and well. You might need to know coordinate geometry(2d & 3d) and some trignometry. I haven't yet needed much of calculus and stuff in game programming as of yet. So for a beginner I doubt if thats(calculus and stuff) really necessary.

quote:
Original post by Jack Morgan
I really don't know much about any APIs yet.... I know enough about DirectX to know that I need it to access hardware through windows, but not much more than that.




Don't worry about this till you learn the programming language you intend to use. Learn the language well. Later you have whole of Directx sdk help files and MSDN to go through.

quote:
Original post by Drizzt DoUrden
Gamedev.net Tutorials. I've yet to find a good math book for newcomers. Eventually, pick up a copy of Physics for Game Developers. Once you understand basic physics, that is.



If you are implying the book published by O'rielley - I really didn't like the preview leave alone even thinking of buying the book. Well thats my opinion.




Edited by - flame_warrior on February 18, 2002 2:26:47 AM
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quote:
Original post by flame_warrior
[quote]Original post by Jack Morgan

Well, I plan to program in C++ eventually.
I have a working knowledge of Visual Basic 6, and I here varible types are pretty much the same through out most languages, so that gives me a little headstart...



I eventually find the Deitel and Dietel much better than books which have 21 days and 24 hours etc in their title.

quote:
Original post by Jack Morgan
My math skills were enough for high school but I doubt they are high compared to anything I would need for programming physical worlds. I''m a bit stumped on the velocity and trajectory things. So a few math books couldn''t hurt, at all.



Well a good maths book is one which you can understand easily and well. You might need to know coordinate geometry(2d & 3d) and some trignometry. I haven''t yet needed much of calculus and stuff in game programming as of yet. So for a beginner I doubt if thats(calculus and stuff) really necessary.

quote:
Original post by Jack Morgan
I really don''t know much about any APIs yet.... I know enough about DirectX to know that I need it to access hardware through windows, but not much more than that.




Don''t worry about this till you learn the programming language you intend to use. Learn the language well. Later you have whole of Directx sdk help files and MSDN to go through.

quote:
Original post by Drizzt DoUrden
Gamedev.net Tutorials. I''ve yet to find a good math book for newcomers. Eventually, pick up a copy of Physics for Game Developers. Once you understand basic physics, that is.



If you are implying the book published by O''rielley - I really didn''t like the preview leave alone even thinking of buying the book. Well thats my opinion.


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