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soundview00

How is it done?

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I am really curious about how does 3d models,lights, and enviornmental structures blend into a 3d game engine written in C++? I have seen where you could save your animation as a vrml or some other form of game translating format, but how does it work in to the code. Keep in mind people that I am not a programmer, just an animator tying to become a programmer. Any input to this question would be great.

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Well... The animator saves the model/scene in a well-documented format that the programmer understands. The programmer then codes a ''loader'' that loads the raw data file and parses it into information about the lights, vertices and polygons in the model/scene. Then the program then tells the graphics API (OpenGL or Direct3D) to draw all the polygons, light them properly and texture them. The graphics API talks to the video hardware(3D graphics accellerator).
I tried to make a brief overview... Do you have any specific questions?
/Ksero

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On the topic of trying to become a programmer.

First, Learn C/C++. This is the big first step. It also genrally costs the most (because C++ compilers, the good ones, cost quite a bit). The standard compiler for game developement on PC is Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0, the new .Net version is out but not that may people have a copy of it right now. I got 6.0 "Standard" for $100 at CompUSA and have almost never regeted it. The standard on Mac right now is Metroworks CodeWarrior Pro although there is a lot of good things to be said about Project Builder. Next, you need a book about C/C++. For pure ANSI C you still can''t beat "The C Programming Language" by Kernighan and Ritchie. As for learning C++, I learned it by reading C++ For Dummies. Wasn''t the greatest read but it did the trick.

Second, Pick up a book on DirectX. While there are plenty of books DirectX, for basic DirectDraw and 2D little games of that type "Windows Game Programming for Dummies" is a buy. However if you want to do something a bit more modern "OpenGL Game Progamming" is a another good choice. It provides a few chapters on OpenGL and a few chapters on DirectX and a little sample FPS for you to start playing with.

Third, Code, Code like the wind. After 50,000 lines or so. You should have your first basic game.

Have fun!

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Thanks fellas'', I really appreciate your input.
You are right in terms of learning how to program in C or CPP.
Which is why I plan to attend college to get a full degree(BS) in Computer Science. I think it would make me a more marketable and independent engineer in the future.
Marketable in terms of getting a good paying job in the computer field, and independent in not depending on other people to get the job done if I plan on creating a game engine.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
depends on the game, a pac man clone can be done in less than 5k lines, but it''s fairly simple

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How can you stand C++ for Dummies? It''s garbage.
WARNING, nobody should buy it. I thought it would be good because VB6 for Dummies rocked, boy was I wrong. I had to go out and buy another book, that''s how bad it was; didn''t explain anything right.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Do not believe that crap about MS VC++ being the best.
Get the borland free compiler.

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quote:
Original post by Galileo430
First, Learn C/C++. This is the big first step. It also genrally costs the most (because C++ compilers, the good ones, cost quite a bit).



You could always use gcc/g++, which is no different than MS' compiler...and it's FREE! I think they have a windows port for gcc...never used it since I've been coding on Linux/FreeBSD lately. But, gcc is just a compiler, no more no less. MSVC++ 6.0 is a compiler and IDE all in one, but costs quite a bit (though I got the student edition at my local university bookstore for about 50$, the enterprise edition will kill ya ). There are free IDE's for Linux/FreeBSD, but I like to use vim 6.0 with syntax highlighting and do all the makefile stuff myself.

I have a copy of MSVC++, and I liked it, except for all that class wizard B.S. If I want to code in MFC (which I do), I'll do it my own way, not the way MS thinks I should.

Anyways,
Good Luck!

Edited by - Floppy on February 23, 2002 10:27:49 PM

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