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Hi. I''m 17, live in the UK, and I''ll be off to university in September. I want to be a games programmer, and I''m already very advanced at VB, C and OpenGL. But I''ve chosen Computing, and I''m wondering now if it''s the best course to take. I wanted to know if anyone here has taken Computing at a British university, and if so, what it was like, and how much programming was there? Or maybe taken something else like Computer Science, or ICT, or anything else to do with computing. What are they like? And how much programming did you do on them? What are your opinion on the course? It''s not too late to change my course, and I thought I''d get some input from everyone here on what the different computer-related courses are like, and which are the best...Thanks in advance for any replies... iNsAn1tY - the place where imagination and the real world merge... Try http://uk.geocities.com/mentalmantle - Now updated!

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I''m finishing my 3rd year of a Computer Science & Software Engineering degree in Ireland (should be similar enough to British courses). We do a fair bit of programming, though a lot of it is theoretical stuff - engineering principles, abstract OO concepts, etc. Far as I can tell, you''re basically introduced to the principles and some standard techniques, and then expected to be able to pick up additional stuff yourself should the need arise. If you''re already an experienced programmer, you''ll probably find a fair bit of first and possibly second year courses pretty boring. We do plenty of other stuff though, that you might not pick up if you''re "self taught" - things like formal spec. languages, engineering principles, design methodologies, working in teams, various types of applied maths, etc.
We also cover a fair bit of digital architechture, digital signal processing, formal methods and weird little languages like CaML and Prolog. Things like complexity analysis and formal proofs for algorithms can also be handy to know.

Your course will possibly cover different topics, but I reckon that''s a fairly general idea of what computer science courses involve.

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I am in exacly the same situation, being 17, living in the UK and of to uni in september.

However, i have applied to do specificly games programming courses. ill try and contact you to tell you what i picked.

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Try doing a lot of stuff you can''t learn from the net like all math courses you can follow, high level programming concept courses, maybe a course parallel programming.

This because you can teach yourself OpenGl in a few days with the right books, but learning lineair algebra on yourself is very tough. For this reason i decided to study physics instead of computer science, you teach a physics student how to program, but teaching a computer scientist how to do physics is much harder.

(all my own opinion though , do what you like best yourself, just don''t study something because you can, but because you want to.).

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Im a first year student at Staffordshire University. I grew up in Birmingham - Northfield, to be exact

Im doing BSc Intelligent Systems. Here all School of Computing students share a common first year, so we can change course if we want before the second year. Im not sure if all universities follow this scheme, but if the uni''s you are applying to do then you dont have to worry too much about making the wrong decision.

Just make sure to do plenty of research on all your courses - browse around the universities'' websites and get out those "Student Guides" from the library. Do what you think you will find interesting. In my case, that was AI.

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I''m first year BSc(Hons) Computer Games Technology at Abertay Dundee, Scotland. The course itself is very good although if your knowledge of C/C++ and OpenGL is high you''ll probably find the programming you''re taught in 1st year is rather easy, I have (although it looks like it will ramp up quickly in following years).

If you''ve done A-Level Maths or Physics then you''ll also be in good stead for the maths/dynamics based modules. Other things included in the 1st year are 3D Modelling, Audio, Marketing (optional), Japanese (optional), MIDI (optional).

Also your surrounded by very like minded people so there is a great opportunity to work with other outside of uni. For example we have a group of 5 (3 coders, 2 artists) working on a GBA game. Plus the course has close links to nearby developers such as Denki, DMA (both based in Dundee) and some japanese developers although my knowledge of that is a little shaky.

The only downside to it is the weather but you get used to it quickly.

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Hi.

I did a BSc (Hons) Computer Studies course at Nottingham and, after graduating, began working for a games company in Warwickshire. So in that respect a good computer-based degree will prove extremely useful. The course I was on offered (at a modular level) computer graphics, data structures, OOP - all of which are valuable for games programming. It is also important that you have a good mathematical foundation...

To be honest some of the guys I work/worked with do not have degree level educations but had demos that proved their skills to their potential employers. So a good demo is required - especially when looking to break into the industry.

On the flip side of the coin a lot of the guys in the industry come from maths and physics backgrounds. It is quite common to see BSc Physicians and Mathematicians in games companies, as well as those from more conventional computer-based courses.

Good luck.

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I''m 16 and hope to study Computer Science at uni next year. Some of the universities I''m looking at are: York, Birmingham, Bristol. If anyone here goes to/went to one of them I would also like to hear.

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