• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

eqs

[java] What editers do you use?

19 posts in this topic

Ive been curious since i started learning Java about using an editer. At the moment i use notepad + DOS for everything. Ive tried jpad, and wasnt really impressed. Is MSJ++ worth getting? I was wondering what real Java programmers used. PEACE GAZZ
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mostly notepad in Win9x/NT and pico in *NIX. For compiles (in Win9x/NT and *NIX) I use make to organize my projects. I personally don''t think MSVJ++ was worth my money.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I use pfe32. It''s a text editor but with nice shortcuts and features. No code hilighting or anything, but it''s fast, supports multiple windows, macros, multiple undos. I use it for all my coding.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If I didn''t get JBuilder with Borland Builder 4 Pro, then I would probably be using PFE right now. I just love code completion (...done right...)

JoeG
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I use JBuilder 3 Enterprise Edition for Windows and JBuilder 3 Foundation for Linux. I have been using JBuilder in Windows since version one, and I have for the most part been happy with it (despite the occasional rough spots). I have just started playing with the Foundation edition, so I can''t really say anything about it.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I use Visual J++ 6 for toying around with ideas sometimes (just because I have it). It takes some getting used to, but once you do it really isn''t all that bad. I stay away from the form editor because it only works with the Windows specific stuff and not AWT/Swing.

I tried Supercede but didn''t like all the excess code it generated. Also PowerJ Learning Edition, it was okay.

I tried Java Workshop as well, and it was just too slow for my tastes. The cursor couldn''t keep up with my typing, which was really annoying.

So basically I tend to stay away from IDEs for my real work. I use WinEdit, a shareware editor I picked up a while back. Syntax highlighting is all I really care about. Think I''ll check out JBuilder, though.

Oh, and I really liked Kawa when I tried it last year.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i rather fond of vi for all of my programming and text-based editing...it''s rather complex, but not as much as people think it is. once you get the hang of it, it''s really rather powerful.

but then i prefer console stuff to GUI stuff anyway.


-----------------------------------------
Look behind you! A three-headed monkey!
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I use XEmacs under both Windows and UNIX environments, with full support for syntax highlighting and indentation.

http://www.xemacs.org

/Pär, Sweden
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ok, i see that theres no ''dominating'' editer in use by Java programmers. So my question now becomes:
''How much easier is it to debugging when using an editer or using DOS?''
For example you write a GUI, and its got a layout manager with multiple panels and stuff in it. Is it easier to do that Visually? Like with VB? Ive toyed with VB and i found it more point and click rather than code. How good is that for games?

PEACE
GAZZ
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I use a program called EditPlus for editing - it does code highlighting, multiple windows etc. and is very handy. I use the Sun SDK to compile and view everything.

I used VB for a while but it seemed a bit too basic for me... plus everything ran real slow (although i''m sure that could be solved by a decent programmer)

- Daniel
http://sw.mtx.net/daniel/
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey you should try Kawa or JWorkshop, Kawa is better i think, JWorkshop has neat option to use modified Javac/Java, but I prefer Kawa because it''s overally faster...
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, im pretty much as confused as when I first asked the question. Seems theres no 1 main editer people use. Oh well, ill stick to notepad.

PEACE
GAZZ
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Use Kawa if you are concerned about cost(www.tek-tools.com). Use Jbuilder if you want a decent gui builder.

DRezz
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by DRezz

Use Kawa if you are concerned about cost(www.tek-tools.com). Use Jbuilder if you want a decent gui builder.

DRezz


Yeah, but I don''t see any benefits in JBuilder/Symanteks vis cafe/Visual Java (whicheveristhenewestversion), because it is so easy and efficent to create gui just with notepad, Layoutmanagers and null-layout gives everything I need and most times in game-programming you can''t use Gui builder because it just errors when it is trying to show image in code etc.



Time comes, time goes and I only am.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Use something besides notepad. If there''s one thing these editors have in common is that they all have more to offer than notepad.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I got this program called Jpad off one of my Cd''s. Is it good? Ive played with it some, the most annoying thing is the damn font. Im squinting to see it!

PEACE
GAZZ
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Im using j++ 6.0 and are VERY comfortable with it, the only downside it has is that you have to all the gui-code manually,

/Fredrik Glawe


0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well I''m also using VJ++ 6.0 but the only problem that I have with it is some default packages weren''t installed with it (such as javax or graphics2D which I could really use). I downloaded a proggy that can import the packages but it can only import cab and zips. Does anyone know where/how to get these extra packages?

Besides that, I don''t have any problems with it.

Smoo

PS When you say "real programmers"... well count me out =P
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You can download the jdk. It has all the necassary classes and it includes a java runtime environment.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites