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archon

ROAM paper question (was dynamic terrain algorithm?)

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Hello, I've been doing some reading on terrain creation algorithms and they all seem to be very good at setting up and then viewing a static area of space, like some rolling hills. I need to constantly update a large portion of terrain in the form of a massive lava pit which boils and rolls with bursting pockets sloshing splashes and lava waves. Is there any good algorithms out there for something like this? Or are standard terrain algorithms ok and I am just reading them wrong? TIA for any replies, A Edited by - archon on March 19, 2002 5:02:26 PM

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i''d check out some water demos/tutorials.


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I want to be able to send a wave through the lava, so I guess I want an algorithm that can update the vertices of the surface quickly.

The problem I'm having now is I'm using a basic pattern of quads covering an area, and when I try and send a sine wave through the heights of the vertices are raised and lowered disproportiantely to each other, so intead of a smooth curve I'm getting jagged peaks and canyons.



So the problem is the quads are stretching, instead of bending, which is to be expected I suppose. Anyway, Nehe's lesson 11 tutorial on a flag waving effect should be some help, and I'm taking a look at ROAM, though I don't know if I want to....





[edited by - archon on March 19, 2002 11:27:47 AM]

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Isn''t it because you have to few polygons in the water? THe more polygons the smoother it looks.

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Yes you are right. I doubled the number of polygons and the wave looked alot smoother.

The problem is still that the change in Y is greater than the change in Z so the quads are forced to stretch. I might need to find the perfect wave dude

I''ll keep looking into more terrain techniques.

thanks.

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Well..if somethings flat it has less area than if it was wavy, i.e if you dont want to stretch you polys you will have to create more at run time when the wave comes along.

quote:

I need to constantly update a large portion of terrain in the form of a massive lava pit which boils and rolls with bursting pockets sloshing splashes and lava waves.



Cool! Make sure to post some pictures when you are finished

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oh, I''m a ways off from any screen shots.... thanks for the vote of confidence though

Actually, I''m trying to read that ROAM paper: http://www.llnl.gov/graphics/ROAM/roam.pdf

....and I''m at part 6 Error Metrics. I''m having trouble understanding exactly what a wedgie is. Would anyone be able to explain it?

tia,

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Guest Anonymous Poster
It''s a triangle with ''thickness'' It''s basically a funny shaped bounding box around the triangle and it''s potential error range.

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ok thanks. I''m still having trouble grokking this. The formula which defines the wedgie references another formula defined in the paragraph above which hasn''t quite clicked in my head yet either.

The paper says:

"In the remainder of this paper we restrict our attention to height maps. Specifically, we assume that the vertex-to-world-space mapping W(V) is of the form
W(V) = (Vx, Vy, Z(V)) where (Vx, Vy) are the domain coordinates of the vertex V, and Z(V) is the height at V. We denote the affine height map for a bintree traingle T to be ZT(x,y)."

ZT(x,y) is then in turn referenced in the wedgie definition, but I don''t know what it is. What is it?

Thanks

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