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quote:
Original post by dampe64
what is the best book to learn C WITH

IS SAMS TEACH URSELF c A GOOD ONE

NO! That book isn''t very good. Get the K&R book if you can keep up with technical material. If you can''t, try C The Complete Reference, that one''s a little kinder. Also refrain from the "For Dummies" books, and I would not recommend anything from Sams publishing.

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There are also a lot of references on the www, but a book does have advantages. I wouldn't completely avoid SAMS books (although in general I agree with the sentiment). One SAMS book with _some_ merit is "C Unleashed" - The accu gave it a qualified recommendation - however, I don't think that book is a good place for a total beginner to start.

K&R: The C Programming Language, Second Edition

You'll also want to get a compiler. A good free compiler to learn C with is LCC-Win32 and a good free C/C++ compiler/ide is Dev-C++. Borland also provides a free C/C++ compiler, however, it's command line only. I'm not aware of any free Mac compilers and of course most Linux installs provide a copy of gcc.


[edited by - lessbread on March 21, 2002 10:07:19 PM]

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dear friend
if u r starting don''t go directly to K&R
that''s a classic book.so better go for some made easy books.
this will give u some confidence and then u can go for other higher level books.

Idispensable guide to C by Paul Davis.
is also good.

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The K&R book is the first one I ever got and it''s great. While it might not treat you like a idiotic newbie (something I find too many newer books doing) with writing in a casual tone. It doesn''t try to confuse you. It doesn''t get bogged down with any thing like graphics, OS specifcs etc.

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i started with severel tutorials and now i''m trying to get/buy/borrow Bjarne Stroustrup- The C++ programming language. in my opinion this one is one of the top books of c++ (well what did you expect from man who created c++? )

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I must be way out of date. All of my C++ books are from SAMS publishing.

Object-Oriented Programming in C++
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C++ Primer Plus
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Teach Yourself C++ in 24 Hours - My first C++ book ever!
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But have some sympathy. I''m a 12 year old programmer and I live in a city that has almost zilch programming books in their library. Also, my parents think I have enough books to last for a while. Although I try to tell them otherwise.

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I''m reading C++ Primer Plus right now, I like the book. I think it discusses all of the topics pretty well. Although, it seems that they don''t cover each topic in enough detail at the time they introduce it, or maybe it is just me... I have past experience in C, so it is a lot easier than someone that doesn''t have a clue to it.

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Teach yourself c++ in 21 days
Teach yourself Visual c++ in 21 days
Thinking in C++
Bjarne Stroustrup- The C++ programming language

and probably a few others, are all available for download in electronic format. Not sure of the links, just do a search and you will find them.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Be aware that if you''re using the "Teach Yourself Visual C++" books, that they generally aren''t teaching you C or C++, they''re teaching you how to use the compiler. You may be able to write some relatively simple programs after going through it, but woe to you if you get a big nasty error, and don''t know the rules of the language.

My advice (for as little as it''s worth): use a book that specifically teaches C++. Maybe go to one of your local college bookstores and buy a used C++ 101-ish type of book. They will have multiple exercises, in-depth coverage of all kinds of topics that are usually not covered in the "Teach yourself in 30 seconds" kind of books. One that I have been using ALOT is "How to Program C++" by Deitel & Deitel (third edition). They have a website at www.deitel.com [please note that I don''t like the way that they handle namespaces, but it''s still a good instructional book]

Most of your "Teach Yourself Books" will also contain a stripped down version of VC++.

Go through programming exercises step by step, and then try to alter your programs to be more usable to you. When you get stumped, jump online to a forum, and you can usually find some decent help.

Brandon
bwforres@netzero.net

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"i started with severel tutorials and now i''m trying to get/buy/borrow Bjarne Stroustrup- The C++ programming language. in my opinion this one is one of the top books of c++ (well what did you expect from man who created c++? )"

http://www.maxcode.com/nuke/downloader.php?name=MAXcode&d_op=getit&lid=5428

You wish is my command!! Just paste into your browser to get "The C++ programmign Language" in PDF format for free. This is not a warez link.

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