Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Programmer One

[java] Wake up and smell the JAVA!

Recommended Posts

So, what is what, how, where, when, who..? C# Java J++ Now, as far as i know - the Java I learned was compiled using JBuilder. I heard that C# is like Java? I also heard that J++ is Microsofts attempt to tackle Java...? So are all of these mentioned above Java...? Is this right? - J++ is Java, except with Microsoft''s J++ compiler - C# is an alteration to Java made to look like C/C++ - Java is THE Java by Sun EEK!!! _____________________________________________________ ICQ #: 149510932 Google - OpenGL - DirectX - Windows Guide Network - MSDN - Symantec Virus Info "Imagination is more important than knowledge." - Albert Einstein

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You''re just about right.

C# is part of Microsoft''s .NET range. I think it''s supposed to be like C/C++, but I don''t program in C, C++, or C#, so I don''t know for certain.

J++, is the short name for Microsoft''s ''Visual J++''. It is a separate compiler and VM for Java, and it has a large library of its own classes; these let you create windows by drag ''n'' drop, like Visual Basic, or Visual C++. It still can use the core Java libraries, but is more of an ''extension''. Although, using its extra libraries, it takes away the platform independent aspect of Java, because the WFC (Windows Foundation Classes) are only available for Windows.

Java is more a general term for the programming language. The ''official'' java compilers and VMs are the J2SE (Java 2 Standard Edition), and JRE (Java Run-time Environment).

I hope this helps. If it doesn''t, just post, and I''ll see what I can do.

It''''s over for now... until yesterday begins again... tomorrow... tomorrow... tomorrow...

[Powerman 5000 - Watch the Sky for Me]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
C# is basicly a Java clone with a few different features. J++ used to be Microsoft''s Java IDE and compiler, but Microsoft lost their right to call it Java when they broke the license with Sun by doing Java-incompatible implementations. They also did not license newer versions of Java so J++ only has the features that were available in really early versions of Java. It is horribly outdated and should not be used, only C# and Java have real futures.

JBuilder is just an IDE, you were probably using the compiler from Sun to compile the code ''below the hood''.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by HenryApe
JBuilder is just an IDE, you were probably using the compiler from Sun to compile the code ''below the hood''.


Not necessarily true. I seem to recall that code running under the VM that came with JBuilder ran faster than code running under Sun''s VM. I pretty certain that Borland did some tweaking to their Java implementation. The performance of Sun''s Java VMs is pretty weak. Just check the Osvaldo Reports and Volano mark.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by NuffSaid
[quote]Original post by HenryApe
JBuilder is just an IDE, you were probably using the compiler from Sun to compile the code ''below the hood''.


Not necessarily true. I seem to recall that code running under the VM that came with JBuilder ran faster than code running under Sun''s VM. I pretty certain that Borland did some tweaking to their Java implementation. The performance of Sun''s Java VMs is pretty weak. Just check the Osvaldo Reports and Volano mark.



Thats exactly true. JBuilder has its own bytecode compiler (not the same as the one that comes with the JAVA SDK) and own Virtual Machine (Which Borland advertises as faster in most cases to the Sun Java VM)

More info here Borland.com/JBuilder

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
C# is Microsoft''s new language to compete with Java. It ties your app to Windows. This isn''t necessarily a bad thing, but just something to consider.

J++ is Microsoft''s old IDE. Personally, I really liked J++ and am sad that it was dropped by Microsoft. While I still use it to do pure Java editing, the WFC component that made windows apps so easy to create only implements Java 1.1, which is a few years old now. Java 1.1 is slow compared to 1.4 (the latest release), and therefore not the best choice for apps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by mjacobsca
C# is Microsoft''s new language to compete with Java. It ties your app to Windows.

Not entirely true. It ties your app to the .NET runtime, which presently is only available on Windows. There are ongoing projects to implement the runtime on other platforms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WINE
DCOM
ActiveX

...to name just a few cross-platform technologies, which mysteriously never made it past Windows or died through "lack of commercial interest from customers".

.NET is Windows. They''ll tell you until they''re blue in the face that it isn''t. And you can go on believing them right up until the point that support for other platforms is officially dropped, like all the other stuff.


Cas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:

Original post by princec
.NET is Windows. They''ll tell you until they''re blue in the face that it isn''t. And you can go on believing them right up until the point that support for other platforms is officially dropped, like all the other stuff.


Only Rotor is officially sponsored by MS - the other projects are working off the ECMA submitted docs(Neither DCOM, the Win32 API nor ActiveX were subject to an open standardization process, were they?).
If you take a look at Mono''s site, browse through their faq - look at their class status etc... I think you''ll agree that this is a project that is far from dead. I somehow managed to get myself on their CVS notification mailing list, and there is a massive amount of code checked in to Mono every week.
Mono will happen, like it or not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Of course it''ll happen!
And it''ll be a huge success until MS notice, and shaft it in some ingenious way. Their whole business model is ramping up to owning .NET - and they will. Look at how the Samba team get dicked around every time a new release of Windows comes out.

Of course this is just pure speculation and idle banter

Cas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites