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Sgt Horvath

Computer to playstation???

3 posts in this topic

I was just curious. How does it work? Do you just make a game then burn it on to a playstation cd or something?
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No way, when programming computers you use special API''s(DirectX, win32, OpenGL...) which arent available on playstation.
On computers ALOT of stuff is done for you by the operating system but on consoles you have to control everything directly and call special registers in the cpu as the hardware is quite different and you have to use dev kits that hookup to the comp you program it on via ports.
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If you're looking to develop for the PS1 then either get the Yaroze Playstation


(Its a black playstation with a simplified version of the playstation SDK and a special serial cable to connect your PC to the Yaroze) or go to psxdev where they have tutorials for development and a link to PSX Serial Port Link Project which tells you how to change your regular Playstation into a dev unit (build the serial cable, etc.)

If you're looking to develop for PS2 then you're probably out of luck. You need to pay out some big bucks for a PS2 SDK, and Sony may only be selling to companies.

[EDIT] In response to the actual question you do use you're computer to develop for the PS but you use a different compiler and libraries (No DirectX, Win32 API) than regular windows development, just like when developing for the palm.

[edited by - Michalson on March 24, 2002 11:02:53 AM]
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The core component of the official PS1 devkits comprises of 1 or 2 very large ISA or PCI cards (depending on the version - 2000, 2500, or 2700). These cards have a video output and ports for the controllers. On top of this there is usually a specially formatted hard disk which acts as a CD emulator (burning a new CD every time you want to change anything is a tad wasteful and time consuming).

The compiler which comes with the devkit is basically a modified version of GNU GCC although most developers prefer to use either Metrowerks CodeWarrior or SN Systems Pro-DG. Generally PS1 compilers don''t do C++, only C.

As for the libraries - as mentioned, you don''t get OpenGL or DirectX, and there isn''t a traditional OS like Windows there. What there is however are special Sony libraries which simplify the task of interfacing with the hardware. If you check out the Yaroze you''ll get to see some of the higher level libs.
The hardware is also accessible directly - the graphics core of most PS1 games is often written in assembly directly to the hardware registers.


PS2 devkits are external boxes (like a giant retail console, except with the word "TOOL" written on the side) which connect to your LAN (this allows a devkit to be shared between programmers) - the harddisk of the machine which is currently talking to the devkit acts as the CD emulator/file serving drive.
The libraries are similar to the PS1 libraries - the hardware is of course very different though.

For PS2 development check out the PS2 Linux stuff which Sony have/are making available.


GameCube devkits are external blue metal boxes (or PC style boxes for the earlier kits) - they connect to the host PC with a SCSI card. The harddisk of the host PC acts as the file server in the same way as the PS2. The libraries are higher level than with the PS2 (making development simpler).

--
Simon O''Connor
Creative Asylum Ltd
www.creative-asylum.com
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