• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Michalson

Simulating a network on one machine

7 posts in this topic

I''m interested in developing some multiplayer software, and I''ve already created a simple chatroom in DirectPlay. My problem comes in testing. If I''m connected to the net or on a network I can created two instances of my chatroom on one computer and connect them to each other. However, without the network connect they cannot detect each other. Is there anyway I can configure my system to believe it''s on a network (?make multiple ips?make a program to bounce back packets?). Any suggestions would be appreciated.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I dont know what to do about having only one system, but if you have two systems you might consider getting a serial cable and using the Direct Cable Connection program that came with windows. It simulates a network, and I found it pretty useful before I actually put in a real network.

--TheGoop

Edited by - TheGoop on 3/3/00 4:50:15 PM
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The only way I can think of configuring a single computer like that is to put two network cards in and bind them to different IP addresses and link them to each other. Obviously it''s a lot easier to just get two separate computers than to deal with that kind of weirdness.

Possibly you can write a device driver to emulate a network interface and pass events over loopback to other instances of itself, but that is probably outside the scope you''re considering.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I do all my testing on just one machine. You know the address you want to connect to: 127.0.0.1 is the IP address, and the port is whichever port your program allocates.

Provided each instance of your program allocates a unique port (and can determine the other instance''s port) you should be right. (I''ve never tried running two instances of a program that allocates a set port so I don''t know what would happen, but I imagine the second instance would fail?).

You mentioned DPlay in a peripheral sense, so I''ll just add that I know nothing about it.

-Hotstone
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hotstone: Directplay binds on interfaces rather than TCP/UDP ports, so you can''t use the normal IP loopback address for debug effectively. Oh and two sockets attempting to bind on the same port *will* cause the second call to fail.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, at the moment I can do some limited testing with my p120 laptop hooked up to LPT1, but eventually my laptops lack of a 3D accelerator will render testing impossible. If anyone else has any ideas I would still be interested.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The ideal way to test you software is with the actual hardware, i.e. two computers hooked up together, if you cannot afford this expense, then look at asking a few people to help you out with testing it.
Although you baffel me, why, having (as you have said) been able to make it work on a network, do you want to try running it twice on your own computer?
Oh well, the worlds a strange place.
And while we''re at it, I have 2 test machines here with all the kit, so if you are desperate I''ll test it for you if you sent it to me.

Take it easy, they''re only suggestions

-Mezz
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I debug my DirectPlay apps on the same computer, but I only use IPX, because that works fine on the same computer, but if you want to test performance/lag and more advanced stuff, you should let someone else test it.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites