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A simple question

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Hello, please look at this picture http://www.topace.de/turbine/turbine.jpg it shows a car with a turbine mounted below the rear axis ! now my question is : when i drive this car does the front move in direction of A or B

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Guest Anonymous Poster
<img src="http://www.topace.de/turbine/turbine.jpg">
???

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He prolly means those two circles to be wheels. If the turbine is mounted to the axis (so it doesn''t affect the link pipe or how to call it), the front wheel should, in my opinion, go down beacuse as it moves forwards, the air makes the "pipe" (the pipe holding the wheels together) go down and that''s why the front wheel gets down as well (it there was no road (if there was, this question would be irrelevant, or?)

Note: I''m not a guru nor and above average physician

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Off topic but I just thought I''d say to Caesar: a physician is a doctor, you meant physicist.

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I got a bet with my friend and he says the direction is B and I say the direction is A so I hoped you guys have an answer for me.
I should explain the problem a little bit better :Does the torque of the turbine cause a force on the frontwheel in direction of A or B? PS: My English is too good for you!

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Let''s consider the picture... you''ve got a point of thrust mounted below the rotation axis of the rear wheel... and some mass (the front wheel) hanging on the end of the beam that also supports the engine. The location of the thrust vector generates a moment about the axle of the rear wheel in the anticlockwise direction and so IF the thrust is sufficient (which looking like a jet engine, I''m betting it is), then this will cause the beam (and hence the front wheel) to rotate anti-clockwise, or in the case of the direction marked A. There are no apparent forces that would cause the rotation toward B.

Regards,

Timkin

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Uhmm

If I understood well, and each wheel can rotate freely around it''s axis, then I think in the exact moment described in the picture, the smaller wheel will go mostly to the "B" direction.
If this goes by unsolved Ill try to do the maths tomorrow or something (not sure if I still remember dynamics, or whatever it is called ).

Cya,
-RoTTer

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