• Advertisement

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Availability & Quality of OGL drivers

This topic is 5854 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I''m loving coding in openGL now that I''ve gotten into it, but I hear dire comments about potential market size issues... because I hear people don''t have decent opengl drivers, or any at all, or many manufacturers STILL aren''t making them, and GLSetup doesn''t run on XP... The question is: can you get away with a GL-only mass market product? And I mean MASS market. My current audience is practically the solitaire/minesweeper crowd. I don''t have a very big audience, so I can''t afford to alienate 1/2 of them with something they can''t run. Any ideas, or actual hard facts? Mike Hommel Hamumu Software http://www.hamumu.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Is Quake3 (and all it's derivates) mass market enough for you ?

Answer: Generally yes, but it depends on your specific target. If your target are general 'gamers', then definitely yes.

[edited by - Yann L on April 17, 2002 2:31:06 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
and in Windows there is the software implementation of OpenGL included with Windows.

To the vast majority of mankind, nothing is more agreeable than to escape the need for mental exertion... To most people, nothing is more troublesome than the effort of thinking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, to the first, no, Quake 3 is definitely not mass market enough, but that''s good news if it truly requires openGL (no D3D support at all?).
And the other question is, does the software implementation do any good? I''m not trying to push the envelope or anything, but for a fairly low number of polys (alpha blended that is - this first openGL game is actually 2D, using alpha blending to get antialiased sprites), does it do a tolerable job?

Mike Hommel
Hamumu Software
http://www.hamumu.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is a good question. I''m working on some mass market games as well, and I''d love to use OpenGL for them, even though I don''t need most of its features. My feeling is that it''s a bad idea, but I''d really like to find some kind of study showing what the average computer user''s setup is these days. My gut feeling is that although you''d have a hard time buying a new computer that doesn''t have 3D acceleration, there are still probably a hell of a lot of computers in use that don''t.

As jenova pointed out, there is a software implementation that exists on every version of Windows (other than the first couple of releases of 95), so the question would be whether or not your games perform well enough in software on a low-end CPU. I''d suggest finding an older PC, putting together a demo, and finiding out on your own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:

Well, to the first, no, Quake 3 is definitely not mass market enough, but that''s good news if it truly requires openGL (no D3D support at all?)


Hmm, you seem to have rather high requirements there... But no, Q3 has absolutely no D3D support, and is 100% OpenGL (this has to do with Carmack''s somewhat special state of mind). On the other hand, this guarantees a good OpenGL support, at least for high end cards, since Q3/Q4, Doom3 and co. are considered to be one of the absolute highest profile titles out (also from the POV of the hardware manufacturers). Most OpenGL drivers are actually build around those games.

quote:

And the other question is, does the software implementation do any good?


To be honest: no. The software implementation is (at least the Microsoft one) a shame. If your target market includes not accelerated systems, then you really should reconsider your choice, OpenGL might not be the suitable API for that task.

/ Yann

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
the last time i used the software implementation of OpenGL was under Win95 on a Pentium 166MMX in 1997. at that time, with alpha blending enabled i got 2-3 fps. as well performance dropped with linear texture filtering. however, i''m sure you''ll get much better performance with today''s computers. all i can say is try it out.

i tend to think that companies that write bad drivers, are going to write bad drivers across the board *** unless they are somehow influenced by a very big software company *** .

i''m the kind of person who tends to try to not to tell people what to use or do. i would say that if this is a real big issue for you, get some hard numbers on the issue *** REAL RESEARCH, NOT HE SAID, SHE SAID *** .

i personally haven''t had much problems with any 3D API (Direct3D, OpenGL, or Glide) and i''ve had Matrox (PowerVR), ATI, 3Dfx, and nVidia video cards.

To the vast majority of mankind, nothing is more agreeable than to escape the need for mental exertion... To most people, nothing is more troublesome than the effort of thinking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, I think Q3 being pure openGL is definitely good news for openGL support across the board. But the reason I say it''s not mass market enough is because it''s really just something for hardcore gamers. A popular game in the mass market is more like Solitaire, Minesweeper, Tetris maybe, card games... The kind of people who buy those games vastly outnumber the kind who buy Quake games. They''re the ''non gamer'' types. If you can catch them, you''re doing well! And I know I can''t compete in the ''gamer'' market, since they all want hyper 3D bspline whatever.

So does anybody know where one can get the real research on something like this? Hard to imagine who would even track such things. I doubt the info I''d get from the openGL people would be too accurate! Same problem with Microsoft. I think what I''ll end up doing is running a test - make a little program and ask the people on my forum to run it and tell me if it works. It''s not a very big sample, but it''s representative of my market at least.

Thanks for all info so far... feel free to keep it coming!!

Mike Hommel
Hamumu Software
http://www.hamumu.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
testing is probably the most appropriate thing to do. i think it really depends on what you type of support you''re looking for. lighting with OpenGL, even in software mode isn''t too bad. as well as drawing triangles, even textured triangles (with point sampling). linear texturing and blending is probably going to be slow. i''ve never tried the stencil buffer in software mode, either.

To the vast majority of mankind, nothing is more agreeable than to escape the need for mental exertion... To most people, nothing is more troublesome than the effort of thinking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
>>Well, I think Q3 being pure openGL is definitely good news for openGL support across the board. But the reason I say it''s not mass market enough is because it''s really just something for hardcore gamers. A popular game in the mass market is more like Solitaire, Minesweeper, Tetris maybe, card games... The kind of people who buy those games vastly outnumber the kind who buy Quake games. They''re the ''non gamer'' types. If you can catch them, you''re doing well! And I know I can''t compete in the ''gamer'' market, since they all want hyper 3D bspline whatever.<<

check the USA''s top10 pc games sales figures over the last couple of months u will find that 3 different opengl only games have gotten to the number 1 spot
MOH AA
return to castle frankenstein
Star Wars Jedi Knight II: Jedi Outcast

is that mass market enough for you

btw i believe in the same time period ZERO d3d games have gotten to number one spot, is d3d dead?


http://uk.geocities.com/sloppyturds/gotterdammerung.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement