Jump to content
  • Advertisement

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

codeMazter

LaMothe's tricks for windows...

This topic is 5918 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Ok... I got LaMothe''s "tricks for windows gameprogramming gurus". haven''t read it so much... so damn boring in the beginning. Hella much bullshiet about this and that... Anyway... i was wondering if i should buy "Programming Role-Playing Games with DirectX" ? or does LaMothe''s book cover the same later on ?... i mean, it seems that LaMothe''s book covers alot of DirectDraw. Hence, my problem is that i don''t wanna read the first 350 pages before i can get into DirectDraw... The book, "Programming Role-Playing Games with DirectX", seems like something good. I have knowledge in visual basic, c++, java (currently on object oriented programming). Those cpurses are the ones i have been on at school. So... the beginning of LaMothe''s book is no problem for me. But it seems like he is complementing the code as he goes futher. So i cant understand so much when he gets on directX... would be greatfull if someone could say how "Programming Role-Playing Games with DirectX" developes... c ya

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
LaMothe''s writing style is very relaxed, so if you find it boring you''re possibly not in the right business.

I''ve got this book, so by this and that you mean Windows programming? Get used to it.


Helpful links:
How To Ask Questions The Smart Way | Google can help with your question | Search MSDN for help with standard C or Windows functions

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You know, I wouldn''t say that. I would say though that he doesn''t explain things well, and tries to make up for that by making jokes, but thats just my opinion.

-=Lohrno

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I thought he explained things very well. And I thought some of the jokes were funny too. I guess it is just a matter of opinion.

---
Make it work.
Make it fast.

"Commmmpuuuuterrrr.." --Scotty Star Trek IV:The Voyage Home

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
His jokes get annoying after a while

There was a good description about color depths and how it is arranged in memory, but his RGB conversion and file-loading function blow goats

And you don''t read programming books front to back, you go to the part thats most interesting!!!

I think someone else should write/edit a book for a change

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by codeMazter
Hence, my problem is that i don''t wanna read the first 350 pages before i can get into DirectDraw...


The thing is that you''ll need to crawl through more like 35 000 so-called "boring" pages in order to be a good programmer. It just takes patience to develop, there really are no shortcuts.

When you have grasped the basics of Win32API programming, you can jump straight to chapter 5, where LaMothe starts to write about DirectX and COM in general. If you don''t get the COM stuff right away, don''t worry. No-one really does the first-time through! But it really helps to know its internal workings later on.

DirectX SDK documentation also provides a brief introduction to COM and DirectX.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
the trick is if you understand programming already, then you look through books at the store before purchase. also check the back of the book, most computer books give an approiate level expected for use of the book. dont get beginner books. you "sound" like you think the courses you took for programming will get you prepared for everything coming your way. most likly they only galzed the basics. if you find the section your reading something you could explain to someone who does not know the information THEN go farther into the book. otherwise, its boring more because you dont understand it and want to make games. like all art and sciences, there is no shortcut. seeing things explained by different ppl help. uset he book as a resource instead of one large tutorial. to truly see if your ready for the next level past all the boring stuff. code some of the problems at the end of each chapter and answer the questions (never used his books so i dont know if he does this, most programming books give excerisces). NO copying code now, thats cheating yourself. you may be surprised to find out what you dont know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
I haven''t read "tricks for windows gameprogramming gurus" but I do have his book on Special Effect programming (using DirectX) and the Roleplaying book you mentioned. Of all the books in this series, I have seen a ton of overlap. I would have preferred if each book was half the size and more concise. Lugging those beasts around is a real pain and the bloat is unneccessary (IMHO). Both books have been fairly easy reads, though.

The Roleplaying book is more theoretical offering various tips for handling inventory management, monster management, character development, design, etc. It was probably worth reading, but I don''t think the examples are very practical. There is a "fully-functioning" RPG game on the CD (The Tower), but it''s awful. I''ve seen more impressive gameboy apps.

If I had to choose between the two (Special Effects using DirectX or Roleplaying), I would buy the Special Effects book.

Personally I wish O''Reilly would publish a similar series. They have recently released one about Game Physics Development that is excellent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Personally I''ve given up on buying game programming books; after roughly 6 ringing up at about $30 each I''ve decided to go with current DirectX documentation (free) and tutorials on the web (also free) since most of the new books that I''ve thumbed through seem to be little more than wrappers for the DirectX documentation. Why pay for something that you can get legally for free?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I really like LaMothe''s writing style...

Also I don''t see you problem with the first 350 pages of a book... If you already know it, skip it, if you don''t then you need to know it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!