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Icetray81

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Hi i am a C++ programmer, that has about 6 monthes or so total worth of programming experience. A while ago I attempted to make pong with simple dos graphics, and although It was basically a success, i was disappointed with the graphics. I would really enjoy learning how to work with stuff such as bmps, or higher graphics then simply 8 bits. I usually use an old version of TC(3.0). But I also have TC (4.5)

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I would suggest dumping turbo c in favor of microsoft''s visual c++. I hated the transition from DOS to windows programming at first because they are two totally separate worlds, but once you get over the hump of learning the basics it becomes much more fun. I would work on learning mfc first. It is big and bulky, but it is easy to program and is a good way to learn the basics of the windows environment and also object oriented programming. Once you are pretty comfortable with that you should be able to learn win32 very quickly which is the smaller, faster, bare bones approach. then you can start exploring the dx sdk for creating your games. it sounds like a lot of work and a lot of extra steps to reach a goal, but I would highly recommend it because the days of DOS are long gone.

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There are books that come with stripped versions of Visual C++ for free (like LaMothe''s book). Combine that with the DirectX SDK (also free with the book) and Microsoft''s web site (much of Microsoft Developer''s Network CD-ROM for free) and you are in the big league.


---
Grandpa Simpson - "I never thought I could shoot down a German plane, but last year I proved myself wrong!"

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I disagree with ThomasAtwood.

If you want to program games, then why bother witch MFC ?

Basic knowledge of Win32 programming is enough to get you going with directx..Actually I started adding stuff to the DirectX samples without any knowledge whatsoever of win32. But a little knowledge of basic windows programming is an advantage...

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I don''t know, it may depend on what he wants to do. MFC has its time and place, and it will help him to learn how to do things OO style. Lets also not forget that it''s pretty handy to whip up tools with MFC also. I personally use both win32 and MFC, though im a master of neither. I think if you want to make games knowing windows is a great leg up if your developing for a MS platform. DX code looks like windows code, so its less confusing if you know the basics.

Mike Barela
mbarela@earthlink.net

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I use assembly for the engines and (if it is done for window that is)the windows enviroment.
The main-game stuff I write in plain C.
Asm code compiled Masm32
C with Borland C++ 3.1
then linked togehter with Masm32 again.
I use asm ''cos I like it, and you get an idea of how it works in every single detail, but I understand people who doesnt like it, ''cos it''s really confusing in the beggining.

//Fredda

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The suggestion was not to use mfc for games. the suggestion was to use mfc to learn the basics of windows programming.
i personally believe it is almost a necessity in this field right now to know how to program for windows. Programming on modern operating systems is quite different from the low-level world of dos where you have direct access to all the system devices. In the higher-level world of windows, you only interface with the os (for the most part). Not knowing the OS very well is a big disadvantange. I do not advocate mfc for anything that requires any amount of speed or compactness. I just think it is easier to use when beginning to learn the windows process. I guess I''m just trying to say that I believe you will be a much stronger programmer in the end if you learn the basics pretty well before you jump right in to the directx stuff.

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I''d have to disagree with MFC being a good way to learn Windows programming. Using MFC it becomes very confusing as to what calls are MFC functions and what calls are actual Windows functions. MFC may give you shortest time to product, but simple disection and extension of existing pure API call programs seems, to me, a better way to learn the API.

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Of course, it depends on your intentions. If you want to get into the nitty-gritty of Windows development, you can go the Win32 API route. Let me give you a fair warning though: it will take a while to do what you want. However, if you want to develop applications fairly quickly, using OOP, and without all the nitty-gritty details of the API, learn MFC.

Personally, I use MFC simply because I want results and I find it easier to create more complex Windows applications.

Kevin

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If you don''t wan''t to spend 9999999+$ on programming tools and stuff... and still wan''t to be able to code really cool games... my suggestion would be to install a simple linux dist. like mandrake linux or corel linux and use the pgcc compiler. (otherwise try phatlinux,dragonlinux or winlinux2000 if your not shure about this linux idea

There are a couple of nice API:s that you can use for loading images, play nifty sound effects, render great landscapes, making a new kickass game called "THE GAME", or whatever... all thoose things is _FREE_OF_CHARGE!!!!_

(dragonlinux works on your standard FAT partition and needs about 20megs of your harddrive, + a couple of megs for your projects and API:s

One big advantage of this suggestion is that you also get a more stable working environment.


"Look mom, a demoscener! Can i keep him?"

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