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jjmontes

Different terms to be explained

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I''ve post a question in other thread but I''d want the answers to be explained with more detail. So, I''ll put here what I''ve understood so anyone who wants can detail them. I also invite to anyone who has doubts about different technologies and terms to put them here so all of we can put our ideas in order: TERMS: MANAGED CODE: i was told is code that runs in a managed runtime environment. This runtime takes care of certain services, such as heap management, security checking, dynamic class loading and garbage collection. So I suposse that Java and C# is managed code, since it runs in a virtual machine that takes care of all of this... i am wrong? C#: is the same that objective-c? No relation. is similar in design to Java? The language design resembles Java, yes. However, it is far closer to C++ than Java is. what is better in it? Depends on who you ask However, many people think it corrected what they perceived as flaws in Java, as well as being a far simpler and more elegant language than C++. So I suposse that C# is simmilar to C++ but you cannot do certain things ''confussing'', I think there should be object references instead of pointers and many other things that I think make Java a great and clear languaje... i am wrong? does it have ''interfaces'' (which I think are great)? if so, i think I''ll move to C# because I love both C++ and Java and would be great a languaje with C++ sintax and Java ''way of programming''. VC++: can be used to produce both managed and unmanaged code. VC# can only target managed code, that will run under the .NET managed environment. Thanx. Add your own doubts if you want

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quote:
Original post by jjmontes
I also invite to anyone who has doubts about different technologies and terms to put them here so all of we can put our ideas in order:

Oh great, this is gonna be a field day. What you have to beware of is that a lot of the terms you are bringing up are inventions of marketing departments, and often have little technical merit.
quote:

So I suposse that Java and C# is managed code, since it runs in a virtual machine that takes care of all of this... i am wrong?

Well, not particularly. Apart from you won''t find the term "managed code" used w.r.t Java, since it is an MS marketing term.
quote:

So I suposse that C# is simmilar to C++ but you cannot do certain things ''confussing'', I think there should be object references instead of pointers and many other things that I think make Java a great and clear languaje... i am wrong?

About what? About C++ being confusing? About object references (which, incidentally, are pointers in Java and C#)? About Java being a "great and clear" language?
quote:

does it have ''interfaces'' (which I think are great)? if so, i think I''ll move to C# because I love both C++ and Java and would be great a languaje with C++ sintax and Java ''way of programming''.

Sigh... what is it with you people? What do you hope to get out of this? What''s so great about C++''s syntax and Java''s "way of programming"?


[ C++ FAQ Lite | ACCU | Boost | Python | Agile Manifesto! ]

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Managed Code - A Microsoftism for code that runs in their .NET Runtime (Common Language Runtime). Java isn't considered 'Managed Code' though their idea of a sandbox covers the security aspect and the nature of the language covers the heap management, bounds checking etc...

C# - I too think that it's closer to C++ than Java is to C++. There is passing by reference, using the 'ref' keyword. As to doing 'confusing' things, a bad programmer is going to write bad code in whatever language they use. It doesn't have 'interfaces', but it does have abstract classes which are used to define interfaces.

What is .NET?

[edited by - jonstelly on May 31, 2002 11:47:44 AM]

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