Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Which d3(d)8 book to buy?

This topic is 5673 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hi, I want to buy a book about Directx8(.1). I''m only interested in D3D, but it won''t be any problem if a bit DDraw is included. Anybody has any suggestions? Thx, Steve_-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That's easy. Buy "Programming Role Playing Games With DirectX". It's written by some dude called Jim Adams (which I've just found out is the moderator of this forum....small world) and it's from Premier Press. It covers D3D in full; after reading it you'll have a pretty good understanding of the basics behind D3D.
----
A year spent in artificial intelligence is enough to make one believe in God.

[edited by - rohde on June 2, 2002 4:42:58 PM]

[edited by - rohde on June 2, 2002 5:03:11 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are there other books that Jim Adams has written in regards to DirectX 8.x? Or is "Programming Role Playing Games With DirectX" the only one? I am interested in what the book actually covers. I would ideally like a book that explains how to set up DirectDraw and Direct3D from scratch - I don''t really need any explanation on how to make a game. Information on any Windows programming that is required at the same time would be helpful.

Jason Doucette
www.jasondoucette.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DirectX 8.x books probably won''t have DirectDraw because DirectDraw is not part of the 8.x API (although you still have access to the old interfaces).

my book - "Real Time Rendering Tricks and Techniques in DirectX" covers the nitty gritty of D3D without getting into any game design. THe emphasis is mostly on shaders and "new" features of D3D.

There is very little windows programming info short of what you actually need to get a window on the screen. I''m not sure what exactly you are looking for with regards to "windows programming", but I figure I better warn you that I don''t cover much of the Win32 API, MFC, etc.

The complete TOC can be seen here:
http://www.books24x7.com/toc.asp?bookid=3879

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Basically, I am an old school DOS programmer, as you can see on my online resume page, and I want to know how to plot a pixel (via software), a sprite (via hardware), or a poly (via hardware) to a buffer. And how to animate the buffers via double/triple buffering.

Right now, I have a simple DirectDraw program that handles most of this, but it isn''t ''complete'' - it doesn''t have all the windows coding done, and the proper catches when the program loses it''s surfaces from an ALT-TAB, etc. I want the minimal amount of windows programming - I don''t want to program windows (not, yet, anyway) - I want to program graphics. I don''t need any help on how to rotate a poly in 3D, or how to manage sprite, etc - I just need a very basic tutorial of DirectDraw and Direct3D (I know they are combined in v8.0) to get me on my feet.

I know I can look at the SDK''s, but I would like an explanation with samples, if possible. I like to know why things work the way they do - not just to be told that ''they work so be happy''.

Any recommendations?

Jason Doucette
www.jasondoucette.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just about any book should tell you how to create / manage a D3D device. Just make sure it covers 8.0 or higher.

I try to include as much info as I can about why different settings are useful/interesting, but the SDK gives more complete coverage than most books (probably) do. I covered handling reset devices, etc. and explain the flags, but the SDK also covers that in more detail. I tried not to get into the business of rewriting the documentation.

My suggestion: get a book that gives you the basics and presents it in a more comfortable tone and then use the SDK to fill in the blanks where appropriate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The "Programming Roleplaying Games with DirectX" book is a great start if you want to do role playing games. (I do, so it''s been great so far.)

The first part of the book covers C++ language basics, storytelling, Direct3D, DirectAudio, DirectInput and DirectPlay.

All of these are explained as good as I have seen.

Then the author begins on developing 3d Game engines as well as many other topics which lead you to a full mini RPG game. There were a few errors, but his site at home.att.net/~rpgbook has all the fixes. Most of the errors were due to the transition Microsoft made from DirectX 8.0 to DirectX 8.1.

It''s been a great book for me so far and has helped me alot in getting past the basics. I''ve been trying for a year now to fully understand this. Got frustrated and tried a VB game engine for a period of time which was great, but due to poor business practices, I left their engine and started back on my own.

If you have a working knowledge of C++ and a small familiarity with DirectX, this book is great. The only reason why is because this book is a monster and the author has to cover all the topics as efficently as he can, but he does a great job.

From what his website says, he''s currently working on another book as we speak.


Good luck,

Paladin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
**off topic**

Sorry for not really pertaining to the main post, but I didn''t want to make a whole new thread for this.
CrazedGenius: If I''ve gone through the basic material of Programming RPG''s with DirectX 8.0 would I be able to understand your Real Time Rendering Tricks and Techniques in DirectX? Is that a good book to follow it up with? I won''t be... surprised/confused, will I? I''m assuming it bases the code around DirectX 8.0+ in C++. I''m about to buy it but I''m not going to spend $50 if I can''t get through the first 100 pages.

By the way, Programming RPG''s is an excellent place to start from scratch (it''s what I did). Some of the material may seem way too specific to gaming (or even role-playing gaming) but the DirectX basic material in it is explained greatly from the start.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
@okonomiyaki, I have this book as well . This book is more based on shader techniques. The first part of the book is a repeat of D3D basics. Also a very good explanation, then it takes you into different shader techniques. Once you are past the 3D basics, the chapters are short basically just describing each technique. It is a good book as well, but is focus on quality rendering rather than game programming. If that''s what you are after, then it''s a good book. I plan on going back to it after I get past the basics of RPG. Hope this helps.

Paladin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
http://www.gamedev.net/community/forums/post.asp?method=reply&topic_id=97716

Okay, well I''ve read a lot of books about DirectX and 3D/2D game programming in general. Basically, here''s the books I recommend. You can choose which one based on your needs. They are in no particular order.




1.) Programming Role Playing Games with DirectX by Jim Adams

This book is helpful in a lot of ways. It is the one helpful recourse for both technical and basic DirectX techniques. It covers most aspects of DirectX although it''s focus is d3d8. The one thing that makes it stand out is it''s .x file skin mesh and node tree sections. Although the skin mesh section is fairly short, you can pick up what is going on from the source given. A downfall for me though was it''s focus on a mad lib scripting language. I felt personally that it wasn''t needed and didn''t need to cover 3+ chapters on tell what you can do with it. Many people disagree because it is necessary for a Role Playing Game to be created and like the title says, it''s about RPG''s. One more downside, it seemed like throughout the book he was just telling you how his RPG code/engine worked and not really guiding you through but again many people disagree. Overall, it''s a good book for RPG developers.




2.) Special Effects Game Programming With DirectX by Mason McCuskey

I''ll start off with the bad first. Matrix math is done differently but it is corrected at his site. Some samples require modifications to work properly, at least for me. With that over with, I''ll continue to the good. The book is very helpful for both a beginner and intermediate programmer because of it''s many uses. For one, it is very well written for a beginner but includes tips along the way for the person needing more. It is true that he doesn''t just teach you how to do a specific need. The focus points(i.e.. particle engines, water, etc.) are just samples of the possibilities of what he really teaches you. For example, the lens flare isn''t just teaching you lens flares. It''s also teaching you ray tracing and more which can be applied to other effects also but he chooses lens flares because they seem the most suitable.




3.) Real Time Rendering Tricks and Techniques with DirectX by Kelly Dempski(sorry if your name is spelled wrong, the book is downstairs in my reading chair :-))

First the bads. You need a decent graphics card to run the samples. I had to tweak the samples a little to run them. Also, beginners will have trouble catching up but the book isn''t focused on beginners with it''s advanced techniques. It seemed the like author just put the newbie information in there because it was a requirement. Anyways, it is an excellent book for awesome techniques. You can''t learn them from anywhere else easier and faster. Do a search on the forums for this book for a chapter list and you''ll see the awesome techniques taught. I have to recommend this for the intermediate programmer looking to become more advanced but I wouldn''t recommend it to a beginner(sorry CrazedGenious).




So what do a recommend? I recommend buying special effects gp w/dx first and then real time rendering t.a.t. w/dx. If you are looking to learn RPG programming, then go with the first one but if you want to learn d3d in general, stick to my recommendation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by RapidStunna
I have to recommend this for the intermediate programmer looking to become more advanced but I wouldn't recommend it to a beginner(sorry CrazedGenius).



Please don't apologize. That's a very fair comment about a very deliberate direction for the book. I had offered it as something for the original poster and Jason D. because they had both asked for D3D only and because there aren't many DX8.0+ books out there.

It is true that I only added the basic info because it was a requirement. Initially, I didn't want to at all, so I included it, but I tried to add "advanced considerations" where I could. In the end, I'm glad I added it, but there are probably better beginner books out there.

I haven't read Special Effects, or Jim's book, so I can only comment with second hand info that they are very good. Plus, both authors seem like decent people I have read a couple of books that I feel are very bad, but I won't mention them by name...


[edited by - CrazedGenius on June 6, 2002 4:59:29 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites