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C++ Mastermind???

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Hey, I''m new to game making, and I''ve decided on the type of game(rpg) that I want to make, but I''m not quite sure how much programming I need to know to start. I want to get Tricks of The Windows Programming Guru, and start soon, since I know a good bit of C++. But my question is how much programming experience and knowledge do I need to know to start??? If you could just tell me basicly about where I need to be it would be a big help.

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You need to know the ins and outs of C++. Including pointers, OOP concept and programming; and of course all the basics (loops, iteration, recursion, data types, functions, structs etc.)

Good luck on your adventure.

A year spent in artificial intelligence is enough to make one believe in God.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Hey, thanx rhode. I know basicly all that stuff. So hopefully I''ll get started soon.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
If you feel comfortable with C++ then you are probably ready to make a game. You don''t have to know all the answers, you just have to know where to go find them!

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Hey brainchild,

I would say that programming is about 35% of a game, so more than programming is recommended. However, there''s no set "prerequisite" to starting to develop games. Well there is one: a love of games. If you have that, you should be able to get through the first hurdles with your sanity (mostly) in tact.

One thing to really study is the various math topics. While little knowledge is required for a 2d overhead rpg, like Dragon Quest, I doubt thats all you ever want to do. Also, good working knowledge of the more basic Linear Algebra techniques will allow you to incorperate some very nice special effects, so its a serious win for you to do that. Most libraries carry advanced math textbooks, beyond College Algebra, as well as other books of interest (my local library has both volumes of Game Programming Gems... but I don''t recommend those to start). Look around.... surprises at every turn

Choose an API to start with. Don''t try to exert yourself with making it for a difficult platform. Nailing the concepts with easier programming is more beneficial than going "guru" and trying to hack around with more difficult stuff. DirectX7 is still a good place to start, because of Direct Draw, as well as being very, very well documented. Once you feel comfortable doing things with it, it will be much easier to learn other APIs, and such. Whatever platform you are working on (I assume Windows) you will want to become very familiar with. All of those things "under the hood" that you didn''t really think about, your going to have to learn. It''s not as hard as it sounds, but it''s also not easy for a beginner. Check out the various resources here for more info.

One of the biggest mistakes I see people make when they decide to make games, is that they just want to jump right into the fray (and why is it always RPGs that they want to make ;p). Start small, make a simple platformer, or remake an old arcade game. Do something where the game''s design is negligible and you can focus on getting it to work. A finished product is worth 3 million good ideas. Also gives you a nice feeling of accomplishment. You''re building on a foundation which includes all of corpses of other newbie game developers who tried to hard a drowned themselves.

Since you want to make RPGs, I recommend you play some very bad ones, to get an idea of what can go wrong. "Design is Law" as some would say (if only those that said it lived by it, Daikatana would have been better). I said that 35% of a game is programming, the other 65% is content. Don''t let the content suffer for any programming reason.

Well that''s about all of the metaphor-ridden Sagely advice I can give. Good luck, and welcome to the fold.

-Warped Mind

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