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jsbach

Would someone actually want to download and play my game, let alone PAY for it

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Hey there, I''ve just finished developing my first game written in visual Basic, which is quite simple one, but yet awsome in it''s own way (as my friends say). I consider puting it in one of the shareware sites on the net. My question is, would someone actually want to download and play my little game, let alone PAY for it? It''s hard to believe that with so many high-quality 3D games out there that I''ll ever be able to compete with them. Any reply would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

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I think most of us will download it and have a look at it..

But paying for it is another story.. When it''s really good and you get a bonus when you pay for it such as bonus levels or maybe the source code then some people will pay for it

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One of my mates recently bought a simple projectile-force/angle game (Pocket Tanks) over the net and we''re always playing it. It only cost 15 quid or something like that so it was within the impulse buy range and it''s a quick fun game, which is probably as much as you can hope for from a garage game product.

Point is that the author sells the games he makes through his own website and using paypal or something similar, so theres very little outlay and it doesn''t matter if not many people buy it. We found a demo of the game on a PC magazine cover cd so if you think your game is good enough maybe you should send a copy into the offices of a couple publishing houses, maybe they''ll like it enough and put a demo on their next months issue.


I assume that you have a demo version, if you don''t you''ll need to make one. Only those who have been thoroughly beaten with the dumb stick pay for things they already have for free.

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quote:
Original post by disgracelands
I assume that you have a demo version, if you don''t you''ll need to make one. Only those who have been thoroughly beaten with the dumb stick pay for things they already have for free.



I disagree, I find both ways good, but you''ll probably get more from giving out a demo version only. However, I find it nicer to give out the ''real deal'' and ask, nicely (no nag screens) for a small donation at about $5 or so.

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quote:
I find it nicer to give out the ''real deal'' and ask, nicely (no nag screens), for a small donation at about $5 or so.



Yeah, but does that work? I would never pirate software, but I don''t donate money just out of the kindness of my stone-cold heart, for products I already have (legitimately). Like, I haven''t registered mIRC, for example. It seems like demos are far more effective.

Though I haven''t bought anything from small-time developers after seeing their demos, either. To put things in perspective. But I''d be more tempted to.

~CGameProgrammer( );

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no nag screens?
as long as it''s just a screen which pops up before the game begins (before the title, not before each game), then I find that to be a perfectly acceptable way of doing things. Maybe force it to stay there for atleast a second or two, none of this 15 second tripe.
Hell, these days, games I pay for have things like this, what with the movies of the publisher, developer, license owner, guy who delivers the mail, that you need to click through EACH one. that''s annoying. If there''s only one, then that''s not annoying. quake3 for instance. it shows the id software logo, but if I click, it goes straight to the menu. perfectly acceptable. Just replace that with a screen saying that you put a lot of effort into the game and that it would be nice to see some kind of payback.

coolios. just my 2c.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by CGameProgrammer
I would never pirate software, but I don''t donate money just out of the kindness of my stone-cold heart, for products I already have (legitimately). Like, I haven''t registered mIRC, for example.


mIRC is shareware, and if you use it beyond the 30-day limit without registering, you are pirating it (at least using it in violation of license). Same goes for WinZip, for example.

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I read this chapter in a book somewhere, & it says that demos are the only way for shareware games ( game being keyword ). You must make a really exciting level which shows of all the cool features but not all features. After level is done you should state all the other features the player is missing etc. And give him easy way to get the software.

Giving them the whole version but with 30 day trial is not the way to go as ppl will pirate it ( grim truth). Also sum ppl may complete the whole game in that amount of time.

The nag screen is the worst selling way ever. Really no one gives a rat ass about devlopers other than the devlopers themself. And I think the target market your after should be bigger then just fellow devlopers. Ppl don''t relize how hard it is to devlop games. Majority of ppl think game devlopers are gamers themself.

hope this helped WizHarD

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Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
mIRC is shareware, and if you use it beyond the 30-day limit without registering, you are pirating it (at least using it in violation of license). Same goes for WinZip, for example.


Nearly 620 days since 30-day trial ended. Still using WinZip. Tough luck!

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quote:
Original post by CGameProgrammer
DOOM was essentially a demo. It was full-featured, but only had a few levels. You had to buy the others.

~CGameProgrammer( );




yup, same thing with quake (1 at least), where you got the first episode only, but the whole game.

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Ech, I guess. It depends rather heavily where you draw the line between ''Shareware'' and ''Demo'' though.

I''m LaMothe educated, so I''d consider it shareware.

Superpig
- saving pigs from untimely fates
- sleeps in a ham-mock at www.thebinaryrefinery.cjb.net

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