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What does game writing envolve?

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("involves", btw )

Game writing covers all aspects of creative writing in games. That is:

Plot and storyline
Dialogue
Things like info-lines, etc.

However, NOT advertising (AFAIK, in this forum at least).

Superpig
- saving pigs from untimely fates
- sleeps in a ham-mock at www.thebinaryrefinery.cjb.net

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Hmm...I began a thread a while ago that covered this very topic, and there were some interesting answers if I remember correctly.

Here it is...



[edited by - tacit on June 10, 2002 2:23:39 PM]

[Edit -- fixed your link. Hope you don't mind... -- Kylotan]

[edited by - Kylotan on June 12, 2002 9:51:15 PM]

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You might also be interested in considering all the fundamental writing that''s inherent in the design process, material that isn''t exactly visible to the gamer, things like documenting game designs and processes, giving character backgrounds and plot summaries, etc.

_________________________
The Idea Foundry

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Thanks for the replys, I kinda wasn''t sure what jobs a designer did and what the writer did. Also I think the link is brocken, tacit. So, tell me if I''m wrong but the designer writes the information that should be given to the programmers, artists, ect. and the writer does all the writng in more detail that the user will see?

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Essentially - an no doubt I''ll get kicked for this - there are four types of game you write for:

(1) FPS or RTS etc.. where you set the scene

(2) RPG (now) where you take the player through a story

(3) RPG (future) where you create the environs in which the player can enact his/her own story

(4) MMORPG where you create the world and cultures etc.. within which the player can associate with others.

So it depends very much on what you want to do. The designer perhaps tells the writer what the structure of the game is. The writer then puts flesh on those bones.

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Crydee...**kick**

quote:
Original post by Crydee
Essentially - an no doubt I''ll get kicked for this - there are four types of game you write for:

(1) FPS or RTS etc.. where you set the scene

(2) RPG (now) where you take the player through a story

(3) RPG (future) where you create the environs in which the player can enact his/her own story

(4) MMORPG where you create the world and cultures etc.. within which the player can associate with others.



My only "complaint", and I use it loosely because it''s more of a modification to your types - every scenario you''ve pointed out *should* have a background story. I can''t imagine someone envisioning a future without contemplating how a society got there - the past. The same for the setting in a present-day scenario; there is still some history involved, if not of the land than of the characters involved.

A simple FPS/RTS has background involved as well; Doom had a basic, formulaic storyline but it still had a reason for your character to be there.

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One thing that really helps is to write a lot MORE story than you actually put into the game. Write a background story for each and every character, even if the character is not a major one.

For insight on what one of the BEST game designers did, you should read the Deus Ex Bible. Warren Spector is a genius when it comes to game design, and you will see that there was a lot of detail put into the design of Deus Ex. If you have played the game, you will notice that some of these details weren''t actually in the game. But if you read them, they make sense.

For example, I did not realize that Tracer Tong sold augmentations on the black market in China. But after reading through the DX Bible and finding that, it makes perfect sense. Was the story any less interesting because this was left out of the final game? No. Was the character more rich because all of the writing had a well-developed character as the basis? Certainly.

--TheMuuj

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I would imagine a detailed written game design also helps to guarantee a consistency in the characters. Otherwise, a gruff character you spoke to at the beginning of the story could be strangely passive in the third act.

Or that same character could act as though he has an entirely different background... an excuse to have the information you need to get you to the next quest.

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