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  1. What's new in this group
  2. well rutin has helped with this problem, but I wanted to get more input. I am still working on my rotation algorithm. I want my bullet sprite to rotate around my plane sprite and shoot in the same direction as my plane is facing. glTexCoord3f(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f); glVertex3f(cos(angle) - sin(angle), sin(angle) + cos(angle), 0.0f); glTexCoord3f(1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f); glVertex3f(cos(angle) - sin(angle), sin(angle) + cos(angle), 0.0f); glTexCoord3f(1.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f); glVertex3f(cos(angle) - sin(angle), sin(angle) + cos(angle), 0.0f); glTexCoord3f(0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f); glVertex3f(cos(angle) - sin(angle), sin(angle) + cos(angle), 0.0f); glEnd(); here is the code I am using.
  3. CrazyCdn

    rotating using trig functions

    Link to the previous discussion where this likely should be discussed anyway instead of in a new topic on the same subject would be helpful to see what has been done already. I also agree with @Lactose, you've been told how to compose "questions" before, it's not difficult in the least either. Also, comment your code! What have you done to debug it? What does that code even do? What is your problem? What is not happening? Extracting information from you is much like getting blood from a rock.
  4. CrazyCdn

    Requesting a code review

    I think he was referring to beginners in the field of game dev. Which I would agree with, fixed time steps do a lot to help them learn. UE4 is NOT a beginner project nor something you should compare to pong 😉
  5. Hey guys! After some googling, and trying different stuff, I decided to start with very basic games as suggested in this article. The article also suggested to get your code reviewed, so here I am! Today I finally finished my first game, pong. 😂 The source code can be found here: https://github.com/Kuurde/Pong Oh, and you can play it here: https://kuurde.github.io/Pong/ Thanks in advance, Kuurde
  6. Lactose

    rotating using trig functions

    When posting a question, what are you supposed to include in the post? Hint: You've been told probably a dozen times or more.
  7. Satharis

    Requesting a code review

    Not sure I agree, at the very least many of the most popular engines in use today don't use this method (UE4 doesn't even used a fixed physics timestep, it is semi-fixed.) Most commonly I see systems get ticked at a fixed rate if they need it (like physics usually is). Other systems tend to just be fed a float delta time, which works fine in practice as long as you don't accumulate large numbers, since those result in significant floating point deviation. Then again I could say the same for globals and/or singletons, almost every major game engine uses them despite them becoming a warzone-topic whenever mentioned here. A more useful distinction is to understand the benefits and negatives of different architectures and pick one that suits your needs. A fixed timestep for physics updates isn't a bad idea.
  8. lawnjelly

    Requesting a code review

    Fixed tick rate is how everyone should learn to structure games (imo), rather than relying on a delta. The gafferongames article explains it well, I also covered it in a recent blog post. There are many, many reasons why a fixed timestep can make life easier, but I should only need to mention one: imagine you are actually trying to ship a game that lots of people had spent years working on, and under some particular circumstances in testing it breaks in unpredictable ways, and other times works fine. That is the kind of thing that happens with variable timestep.
  9. Kuurde

    Requesting a code review

    In my day job I use java, that's why I chose to work with it for my game as well. I'm a backend webdeveloper, but games seem real hard to make. Maybe it's just me, but it's so easy to write ugly code while doing this. So all your points about code quality are valid. I'll try to keep a more flexible resolution/aspect ratio in mind for my next game. @lawnjelly I'm not sure what I should to with the fixed tick rates suggestion? Isn't that what the "getDeltaTime" provided by the libgdx library does for me? Next game will be snake. I'll try to add nicer menus. And I should also figure out how fonts realy work in libgdx. Now I either have small text or blurry text when I try to scale it up.
  10. Rutin

    Requesting a code review

    Great point!
  11. a light breeze

    Requesting a code review

    There's a fair amount of code duplication between players one and two that could be eliminated by having an array of players instead of separate playerOne and playerTwo variables. It's not a big deal for a small project like this, but imagine what would happen if you wanted to allow two-player competitive matches. Or computer-vs-computer attract-mode matches. Or more than two players.
  12. Zakwayda

    Requesting a code review

    Looks good. Here are a few ideas: - There are arguably potential benefits to making things immutable (function arguments, local and member variables, etc.) and unextendable (classes) where possible, which in Java means use of the 'final' keyword. This may largely be a matter of personal preference, and I think some developers may consider liberal use of 'final' in Java just to be noise. Also, in a small-scale project it probably doesn't matter much. Maybe you're already aware of this and just prefer not to use 'final' liberally, but I thought I'd mention it, just in case. - Following on what lawnjelly said, something to try in future projects would be greater flexibility with respect to resolution and perhaps aspect ratio. Ideally, you'd be able to set the resolution in a single location and have the game adapt automatically. - Perhaps keep DRY ("don't repeat yourself") in mind. For example, it looks like at least a couple classes contain similar camera and screen-clearing code. Perhaps this could be refactored into a base class or shared module.
  13. Hi, hope you are having a great day I am interested in creating a game, one that is 8-bit probably. It would consist of 3 main elements: 1.) Challenges where the player has to run along a 2D obstacle course, sort of Mario-like 2.) Little story scenes in between, where there’s just a background and pictures of the characters, talking in the form of text boxes 3.) A player home base, like a camp where the creatures/monsters the player collects during challenges are walking around in random directions, and maybe the player can click on them to read about their backgrounds I have almost no experience, apart from a little programming in python. I loved this kind of thing until I did computer science GCSE, at which point I had a horrible experience (like, nightmare level bad), not because of the subject but because of a teacher who was swiftly fired as soon as the school found out how badly she was treating us. I don’t want that experience to hold me back from something I did once love, though. I was hoping people could give me some tips for getting started, and any advice regarding what programmes would be good to look into? Any help is appreciated, I am hoping to make developing this game a hobby, working on it a little everyday to improve my coding skills Thank you for taking the time to read this! (edit: forgot to mention, I’m decent at art, so can design everything myself, just need tips on what to use to do that)
  14. The 8-bit part would refer in this case to the chosen style of game from that era. Not actually making the game for an 8 bit system. Unless I'm mistaken.
  15. lawnjelly

    Requesting a code review

    I can't really comment on the java side as I'm not very experienced in java, but it looks alright organisation wise for a small game to me, it was quite clear and easy to read. Although it is isn't necessary for this game, I'd suggest mastering fixed tick rates before moving to more complex games. You may also want to move towards more use of constants instead of fixed values in the code (e.g. 800, 480 appear a lot, making it difficult to change resolution), but in this instance it was clear what you were doing, you did use constants for some values (BALL_SPEED, PLAYER_SPEED). Commenting was mostly good, not overusing where the function names worked, although there were a few spots that could have arguably done with just a little comment (around e.g. a spritebatch, explaining what it is and why used?). The challenge will come in maintaining the easy to read / understand structure as the game complexity increases, but this is a good first step imo well done! :)
  16. 8-bit like in Nintendo or Atari? Why not 64 bit? Everyone will soon use 64 bits
  17. I see.Thanks for the tip Rutin. Will do!
  18. JaLue2002

    Taking the First Step

    First time poster. New at this whole programming thing and every journey begins with a single step so here is the first step. A little about me. I am someone whose mind is always creating ideas but they usually just end up as a very well thought out wish. With that being said, I've always had an interest in computer programming and website design which leads me to my concern. I have an idea for an online tycoon game. It is text based. Basically, players can sign up and then they can run their own Movie Studio and/or TV network. They can then create their own movies and release them in different ways (theaters, Straight to DVD, etc.) Their would be different options that the players can select and each choice has an effect on cost and quality of their films. Also a box office system and other random happenings. I know that a database is going to be needed to consist of all the data (genres, talent, etc.) I know I am far away from being able to create this and I don't know if anyone will ever play it or not. But I want to do it more or less to prove that I can. But I want it to be functional. I am perfectly fine taking the time to learn the things I need to learn but I have a couple questions. 1)Is it possible to do this? 2)What do I need to learn to make it happen? 3)Where do I start? Thanks for any responses you provide.
  19. L. Spiro

    Taking the First Step

    If this is an online text game then why wouldn't you use mIRC and code it in mIRC Script? Your goal right now is just to learn programming concepts, which you can do easily enough via mIRC Script, while mIRC handles the online communication and interaction for you. It is easy to get people in to play your game, and that is most important. It's how I got my start before I did any real coding, so I know from personal experience that it is easy to get going, easy to get results, easy to get people to come try it out, and easy to switch to C++ when you are ready for a real language. L. Spiro
  20. Check out the Hobby forum, maybe make a post there looking for a team. https://www.gamedev.net/forums/forum/29-hobby-project-classifieds/ Also, there is a GameDev challenge group which might interest you.
  21. Rutin

    Taking the First Step

    In your case you need to prepare a table with any attributes such as production costs, ect... When the player makes a choice to buy wood for example, you would verify with the database that the player has enough gold, and if so remove the gold amount from the player in the database, and update the wood count. Then relay it back to the user. Keep everything server side, don't feed in attributes to the client and allow updates to the database based on local information otherwise people can modify those values. I would keep it simple to start. Player logs into the game client, the database pulls the player info and feeds it to back to the client and you display it on the screen (You'll have to figure out login and account security though, and making sure the proper user is getting the correct information). The player has 50 gold and wants to buy 1 wood for 25 gold on the market screen. Once the player clicks the quantity amount and buy button you make a call to pull how much gold the player has, and if it's possible to buy the wood then you minus the gold cost from the player's amount, then add 1 wood to their inventory in the database, otherwise you fail the purchase and relay the message back. Once it's all complete, update the client with the new information. All checks need to be done SERVER SIDE, not CLIENT SIDE. Keep this in mind...
  22. Septopus

    Taking the First Step

    When I say it's not entry level, I'm not saying it's super complex either.. There are some really useful things a SQL server can do if you want to explore that route. Look into Triggers, and Stored Procedures if you are curious about some of the more "intelligent" things almost any flavor of SQL server can do.
  23. Septopus

    Taking the First Step

    I would handle most of that kind of stuff as part of the main game loop logic. If you are creating a web type game, then your "main game loop" will probably be some kind of server side system that at least runs your periodic "conditionals". This can be as simple as a scheduled script that executes the SQL statements daily or weekly or whatever, or a full blown server side game loop script/program, written in whatever language that you like, that runs continuously to keep the game state constantly updated(aka: a game Server). If you're just asking about doing the actual math inside the SQL statements that interact with the database, well that's entirely up to your comfort level with SQL, it's a very powerful language on its own. However, the point in your code where the conditional methods/SQL statements are initiated would probably be best in some kind of main game loop. If you are really clever with SQL, then you could theoretically even build stored procedures to do all the math and conditional work and have those scheduled inside the SQL server, without even writing a "game server". But that's not entry level SQL stuff.
  24. Hey, I am looking for someone to make a couple of simple games as a way of learning the essential skills for game dev. I am mainly a programmer, though not very experienced I can get things done even if not in the ideal way most of the time. My art skills aren't so great but I do have great interest in it. If you are up to it we could try to help each other while we attempt to build a game or two. Let me know if you are up to trying it out :) I am currently working with Unity and c# and as someone who tried to do it all myself for quite some time I can't recomment enough that you start with a game engine to learn how the experts solved countless problems that one come across when developing a game.
  25. JaLue2002

    Taking the First Step

    I did think of another question regarding my game. Due to the nature of it, their is going to be alot of conditional things (production cost being effected by specific choices and so on). Plus I want the box office to be recalculated automatically every week. Is this able to be done through SQL or do I need to add algorithms in addition?
  26. Hi there, I’m relatively new to game making. But I will like to try my hands on making a simple pixel art game that can work on either iOS AppStore, or PC. Which software would you all recommend me to use? Hope to hear from everyone. Thanks in advance.
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