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  2. jamey

    Teenage girl to super heroine

    could be a totally different I support your idea its great
  3. jamey

    Better name for "Battle Group"

    sounds nice to me
  4. jamey

    Writing for a Village

    nice writeup
  5. Yesterday
  6. I can make some basic sorts of 2D shapes with Open Simplex or Perlin Noise, but I'm looking for tutorials on how to make various specific 2D things. For example, wood textures, marble textures, etc. I can't seem to find any online tutorials that go beyond very basic concepts. Could you please suggest some tutorials that explain how to do specific things with noise? I am used to coding in Java or Python, but any language is fine.
  7. Wyrframe

    Need pathfinding idea feedback

    Without more complex wrapping code, that HashMap technique leaves no ability to store data relevant to that tile, other than its coordinates. If the only information you have, or will ever need, about a tile is whether or not it is walkable, why aren't you just using a X*Y*Z BitSet, which consumes 1 byte per 8 tiles of walkable data?
  8. For a 2D top-down pixel game, all you need is sprites. Using a game engine may actually be overkill. All you need is to draw textured quads, and you can learn that in a day. I'd stick to C++ in your situation.
  9. Gnollrunner

    Help, a question regarding Game Development..

    The thing is, if you don't use a game engine, you kind of end up building a game engine anyway. I'm doing the same thing, however in my case I'd actually love to use a preexisting game engine if I could find one that would do what I needed. I've been kind of forced to write my own since there is nothing really available that I've found that suits my needs. In any case if you write a game from scratch, say using DX11 of OpenGL, IMO you will end up (or should if you are doing things right) with something approaching a game engine of shorts. It may be highly limited in scope, but you should have some sort of framework just to keep your sanity.
  10. rokkber

    A C64 Game - Final Step

    Dude, that was a really cool series of posts! Love the retro-vibe and explanations. Now I try the game :) Thanks!
  11. Tom Sloper

    Help, a question regarding Game Development..

    Anything is possible, given enough time and money. The real question is (or should be): would this be easier for you than using an engine? I can't answer that; maybe someone else can.
  12. Google and Binomial have announced a partnership to open source the Basis Universal texture codec to improve the performance of transmitting images on the web and within desktop and mobile applications, while maintaining GPU efficiency. This release fills an important gap in the graphics compression ecosystem and complements earlier work in Draco geometry compression. The Basis Universal texture format is 6-8 times smaller than JPEG on the GPU, yet is a similar storage size as JPEG – making it a great alternative to current GPU compression methods that are inefficient and don’t operate cross platform – and provides a more performant alternative to JPEG/PNG. It creates compressed textures that work well in a variety of use cases across games, virtual & augmented reality, maps, photos, small-videos, and more. From the Github page: Read the Google blog post announcement to learn more.
  13. Google and Binomial have announced a partnership to open source the Basis Universal texture codec to improve the performance of transmitting images on the web and within desktop and mobile applications, while maintaining GPU efficiency. This release fills an important gap in the graphics compression ecosystem and complements earlier work in Draco geometry compression. The Basis Universal texture format is 6-8 times smaller than JPEG on the GPU, yet is a similar storage size as JPEG – making it a great alternative to current GPU compression methods that are inefficient and don’t operate cross platform – and provides a more performant alternative to JPEG/PNG. It creates compressed textures that work well in a variety of use cases across games, virtual & augmented reality, maps, photos, small-videos, and more. From the Github page: Read the Google blog post announcement to learn more. View full story
  14. Sylphbox

    Ring Wireloop

    Download Link: Ring - Wireloop
  15. Sylphbox

    Ring Wireloop

    Album for Ring Wireloop
  16. Sylphbox

    Ring Wireloop

    Album for Ring Wireloop
  17. Sylphbox

    Ring Wireloop

    Album for Ring Wireloop
  18. Sylphbox

    Ring Wireloop

    Album for Ring Wireloop
  19. Whoops, sorry about that. I was misremembering how it worked. 🙂
  20. Lopiv

    Space Shooter Customizable

    Well, I was thinking of doing some kind of discord server, organize channels and positions(programmer, artist, tester, etc..) and so on. After that i Will try to create some kind of repository in GitHub or wherever...
  21. New Collection Brings 15 Original Ready-to-Use Materials, Including Two Free to Download; Substance Source Library Now Contains Nearly 1850 Assets CLERMONT-FERRAND, France – May 21, 2019 – The Substance Team today announces the second Substance Source Signature Collection of 2019, bringing with it one of the most versatile sets of materials yet. For his collection, material artist Ben Wilson channeled his love of abstract design and decaying architecture in order to create assets that run the spectrum from beauty to decay, with an emphasis on shape language. Wilson’s 15 original materials are available now and are meant to offer artists working on anything from games to VFX to architecture a source of inspiration and original designs. Wilson’s collection begins with carved layer stacking, meant to convey an abstract and yet simplified expression of beauty. The fully customizable parameters make for a nearly infinite level of variations, and the shapes were designed in a way that encourages experimentation for artists of all skill levels. The designs emphasized in the beauty set are also reflected in the decay materials through the shape language employed. Twisted and distorted features offer a new take on decay beyond the traditional emphasis on factors like death and overgrowth. “For this collection, I wanted to create something that could act as a starting point for artists that want to go beyond the familiar ideas of what we associate with beauty and decay,” said Wilson. “The designs I looked to in order to inspire these materials are somewhat abstract and hard to clarify as beautiful, while others for decay bordered on chaotic. But ultimately, it’s two sides of the same coin.” Whether an artist is leaning towards the beauty materials to help design a modern skyscraper or utilizing the decay assets to create a well-worn stone wall, the color variation was designed to be as user-friendly as possible. All materials offer a primary, secondary and tertiary color picker, allowing for easy color control. Each graph was also created with similar visual features in mind to ensure a cohesive set of materials, so objects like debris, for instance, are shared across each material. To create his collection, Wilson leveraged his years as a Substance Designer user along with nearly a decade of experience creating video games. His resume includes blockbuster franchises including Gears of War and Forza Horizons, as well as work on major releases like The Division. He recently acted as senior environment artist for Machine Games' Wolfenstein II: New Colossus before joining Ubisoft Stockholm as a material artist to work on the upcoming Avatar game. He has also worked with the Substance Team to present a master class during Substance Days GDC 2018. To celebrate the release of the new collection, Substance Source subscribers will receive two materials – “Fossilized Streams” and “Concrete Clover” – for free. Both materials are now available to download from the Substance Source library. Wilson will join the Substance Team for a live stream from Stockholm on May 27, offering a deep dive into the creation of both materials and a look at the collection as a whole. With the release of Wilson’s collection, the Substance Source library continues to grow. Users now have access to nearly 1850 ready-to-use materials, each fully customizable and tweakable for use in anything from gaming to VFX to architecture to design and more. Additional materials will be announced soon, including new collections from artists working in multiple industries. Pricing/Availability Access to Substance Source is available through a monthly subscription. Subscribers receive 30 Substance Source material downloads per month, along with Substance Designer, Substance Painter and Substance B2M for $19.90 (Indie) or $99.90 (Pro). Professional users and teams can also buy the entire Substance Source library, along with one year of updates, for $4990. Enterprise and education pricing is available upon request. Students and teachers can request a license at no cost. About Allegorithmic Allegorithmic, an Adobe company, is the industry leader in 3D texture and material creation technologies. More than 150,000 users in the domains of games and entertainment, film and VFX, architecture, and design rely on Allegorithmic's award-winning Substance texture and material authoring software for developing the next generation of digital content. Clients include: Naughty Dog, Activision, Sony Computer Entertainment, Electronic Arts, Ubisoft, Double Negative, MPC, Foster + Partners, Gensler, Louis Vuitton, Mercedes-Benz and IKEA. Founded in 2003, Allegorithmic is based in France with offices in Clermont-Ferrand, Lyon and Paris, and has global offices in Los Angeles, Cleveland, Montreal, Singapore and Seoul. View full story
  22. New Collection Brings 15 Original Ready-to-Use Materials, Including Two Free to Download; Substance Source Library Now Contains Nearly 1850 Assets CLERMONT-FERRAND, France – May 21, 2019 – The Substance Team today announces the second Substance Source Signature Collection of 2019, bringing with it one of the most versatile sets of materials yet. For his collection, material artist Ben Wilson channeled his love of abstract design and decaying architecture in order to create assets that run the spectrum from beauty to decay, with an emphasis on shape language. Wilson’s 15 original materials are available now and are meant to offer artists working on anything from games to VFX to architecture a source of inspiration and original designs. Wilson’s collection begins with carved layer stacking, meant to convey an abstract and yet simplified expression of beauty. The fully customizable parameters make for a nearly infinite level of variations, and the shapes were designed in a way that encourages experimentation for artists of all skill levels. The designs emphasized in the beauty set are also reflected in the decay materials through the shape language employed. Twisted and distorted features offer a new take on decay beyond the traditional emphasis on factors like death and overgrowth. “For this collection, I wanted to create something that could act as a starting point for artists that want to go beyond the familiar ideas of what we associate with beauty and decay,” said Wilson. “The designs I looked to in order to inspire these materials are somewhat abstract and hard to clarify as beautiful, while others for decay bordered on chaotic. But ultimately, it’s two sides of the same coin.” Whether an artist is leaning towards the beauty materials to help design a modern skyscraper or utilizing the decay assets to create a well-worn stone wall, the color variation was designed to be as user-friendly as possible. All materials offer a primary, secondary and tertiary color picker, allowing for easy color control. Each graph was also created with similar visual features in mind to ensure a cohesive set of materials, so objects like debris, for instance, are shared across each material. To create his collection, Wilson leveraged his years as a Substance Designer user along with nearly a decade of experience creating video games. His resume includes blockbuster franchises including Gears of War and Forza Horizons, as well as work on major releases like The Division. He recently acted as senior environment artist for Machine Games' Wolfenstein II: New Colossus before joining Ubisoft Stockholm as a material artist to work on the upcoming Avatar game. He has also worked with the Substance Team to present a master class during Substance Days GDC 2018. To celebrate the release of the new collection, Substance Source subscribers will receive two materials – “Fossilized Streams” and “Concrete Clover” – for free. Both materials are now available to download from the Substance Source library. Wilson will join the Substance Team for a live stream from Stockholm on May 27, offering a deep dive into the creation of both materials and a look at the collection as a whole. With the release of Wilson’s collection, the Substance Source library continues to grow. Users now have access to nearly 1850 ready-to-use materials, each fully customizable and tweakable for use in anything from gaming to VFX to architecture to design and more. Additional materials will be announced soon, including new collections from artists working in multiple industries. Pricing/Availability Access to Substance Source is available through a monthly subscription. Subscribers receive 30 Substance Source material downloads per month, along with Substance Designer, Substance Painter and Substance B2M for $19.90 (Indie) or $99.90 (Pro). Professional users and teams can also buy the entire Substance Source library, along with one year of updates, for $4990. Enterprise and education pricing is available upon request. Students and teachers can request a license at no cost. About Allegorithmic Allegorithmic, an Adobe company, is the industry leader in 3D texture and material creation technologies. More than 150,000 users in the domains of games and entertainment, film and VFX, architecture, and design rely on Allegorithmic's award-winning Substance texture and material authoring software for developing the next generation of digital content. Clients include: Naughty Dog, Activision, Sony Computer Entertainment, Electronic Arts, Ubisoft, Double Negative, MPC, Foster + Partners, Gensler, Louis Vuitton, Mercedes-Benz and IKEA. Founded in 2003, Allegorithmic is based in France with offices in Clermont-Ferrand, Lyon and Paris, and has global offices in Los Angeles, Cleveland, Montreal, Singapore and Seoul.
  23. Julian Andres Guarin Reyes

    Space Shooter Customizable

    Favor enough, how do you plan to onboard anybody whos willing to help?
  24. pathfinding

    Need pathfinding idea feedback

    @Alberth Thank you for explaining how to do so, I really appreciate it. @Alberth @conditi0n Wouldn't a HashSet work just as well? No memory loss if I just store a new Tile(1, 2, 3) and have the hashCode() generate on (x, y, z), then store it in a HashSet? I feel like there's nothing more optimal than this, or is there? The HashSet would only store the exact number of tiles generated, no extra spaces in memory (like the array). A lookup would be extremely fast too... set.add(new Tile(1, 2, 3)); set.contains(new Tile(1, 2, 3)); // Returns true
  25. I'm not sure how to phrase this and where I should post this, I need some feedback. I get no input being stuck in my head for too long and I don't wish to waste my time on a mere thought. I had an idea and thought that it would make sense expressing it in the form of a game. I am not really a beginner but new to game development.. I do know C++, Python, C# and C but I never made a game before other than the simple tutorial games everyone has to make. I figured my idea was too complex at this point in time and decided to carefully craft out another project that would slowly force me to progress in skill, alongside the development process. I tend to do all my development on Notepad++/gVim and MinGW. Visual studio is great just a little too complicated for me. I'll be taking computer science in Uni so I expect Ill have to get comfortable with it soon. The current game i have in mind is a 2d top down pixel game. No procedural generation, no complex inventory management, no complex fighting mechanics. Now I personally don't want to use a game engine for i find it to be unnecessary with regards to the nature of the game and its simplicity, also game engines tend to be rather bloated with featured I do not currently require. I would prefer using the most optimal tool even if it means forgoing speed. Don't get me wrong, I don't have ideological views toward game engines or operating systems etc Its just a tool to me and I would very much prefer using a hammer to knock in the nails, the tool most suited for the job. I don't like waste or excess. As such for a simple 2d game such as mine, I've been looking at frameworks instead of game engines. SDL(Not really a game framework), SFML(which seems a little more up my alley), raylib(I'm a little doubtful about in the long run), Allegro (could not find many tutorials) and monogame/fna(limits me to Windows mainly, which isn't really an issue as of yet).. However I noticed that for most game developers who tend to use these frameworks, the general pattern seems to point towards them building an inhouse engine for their game, then building their game when they think it's ready. Unity makes it easy, but Its not.. Its just not the right tool and I'll end up being dependent on the engine rather than the code. I don't know enough to make an engine, and I personally am much more interested in building my game than the engine. I do find engine development interesting, but It would take up a lot of time, and this is where my question lies.. Would it be possible to make a full blown 2d rpg-ish game with a game framework, without building a game engine and just focusing on game code? .. By that, I'm assuming a game engine is a separate piece of software/framework. I would really like some advice and feedback/thoughts on what I said and my question..
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