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  1. Past hour
  2. KrisWolfe

    A lesson in Version History

    So, today, while going through my code, my computer crashed. It's an old computer from 2011 that I haven't the heart to replace. When I loaded up Unity, I got over 1000 errors, all talking about the GUI not being able to load. My scene was gone. I double clicked my scene, and it was empty. I had no backup. All my assets were fine, but it was extremely disheartening. Looking up support, it appears my scene got corrupted and is gone. I might've been able to save it if I hadn't loaded Unity, but I didn't know. Unity stores a backup scene to the last it loaded. But once you load unity, that backup is overwritten. Everything I had was UI, luckily. No custom settings or anything. I think I had some fonts that were not the same, so this will give me a chance to get the measurements correct for everything. My scripts were doing all the settings, so I literally just have to drag the UI into their slots once I have them up, and it'll work as plug and play. So a lesson learned. Back up your work. Use version control. I had no back up to this scene. I didn't think it would happen to me. Luckily it was stuff that I can reproduce in a day, and not my code.
  3. Today
  4. Lendrigan Games

    Mature themes on a game I'm working on

    Since it's a horror game, I'd recommend figuring out possible prices for the PC to pay in order to take the good option. Essentially, "you can come out feeling better about yourself, or you can come out unscathed." That the player will take the good path, at least the first time around, is so safe of a bet that it's almost a guarantee, so adding a price to the virtue and a reward to the vice to the margin wherein the player almost accepts, or barely accepts, the vice is the magic area where the horror gets to the player's head.
  5. WitchLord

    AngelScript 2.33.1: Bugs && Features

    Thanks, I'll look into this one too. It will take a while though. I'm short on time and in order to work on this problem I'll need to recreate my Linux environment, which unfortunately got corrupted some time back.
  6. _Silence_

    Take the IGDA Developer Satisfaction Survey

    One of the question is: for how many employers did you work the last 5 years. And there is a choice between 1 and 100 !! And, among the multiple language mistakes (at least in French), there's room to ask how serious this kind of survey is.
  7. The IGDA is conducting its annual Developer Satisfaction Survey until April 30, 2019. Take the survey here. The DSS serves the IGDA in its mission to advance the careers and enhance the lives of game developers worldwide by understanding what they do, who they are and how they feel about their industry. Take the survey to voice your opinions on a wide variety of topics affecting the game industry, from platform preferences to general outlook to diversity and work-life balance. The survey is open to anyone who is involved in the video game industry in a professional or academic capacity, including professors, students, contractors, independents, and so forth. Click here to access the survey. View full story
  8. The IGDA is conducting its annual Developer Satisfaction Survey until April 30, 2019. Take the survey here. The DSS serves the IGDA in its mission to advance the careers and enhance the lives of game developers worldwide by understanding what they do, who they are and how they feel about their industry. Take the survey to voice your opinions on a wide variety of topics affecting the game industry, from platform preferences to general outlook to diversity and work-life balance. The survey is open to anyone who is involved in the video game industry in a professional or academic capacity, including professors, students, contractors, independents, and so forth. Click here to access the survey.
  9. Yyanthire Studio

    Moonrise

    Moonrise is an open-world real-time strategy game. Explore a vast land rich with demonic creatures. Establish a base, and venture forth to eliminate the powerful beings that have overtaken it. As you venture, you will come across great artifacts to bolster your warriors, and great resources to enhance your fortifications. In this land, the will of the leaders is absolute. One false step, and all of your creation will fall under. Intricate care is necessary for your warriors to survive to the next battle. The creatures of this world are powerful- are you able to stand up to them? Explore- Explore a world rich with conflict, where there’s always a new challenge to endure. And reap the rewards of such ventures. The lands are wide and vast, and the journey will be perilous. Do not get lost- always know your way back home. Gather Resources- All of this world has something to offer- whether it be the nature around, or from the souls of defeated enemies. Use those resources to build your base and your army, and wage war against the vast enemies of this land. As you explore more, you will find powerful foes- slay them, and grow your warriors even stronger with the mystical objects they have to offer. Build an Army- Build up your home base not only to act as a fortitude against the enemy onslaught, but also to enact key, pivotal research points. Whether you wish to give your warriors greater health and mana, or advance them down further into their class, building your base is the only true way to get the advancements necessary for engaging more powerful foes. Research- Whether you choose to spend your hard-earned, limited resources on empowering all warriors, or just a select few, researching various upgrades for your army will allow you to further craft and define the complexities of your army to a solid degree. And those who wish to venture even further will find themselves that much more fruitfully rewarded. Wage War- At the heart of Moonrise is waging war against the multitudes of foes of the land. Foes will wildly vary in volatility, and it is up to you to command your warriors in such a way to slay them without becoming slain yourself. Never stop moving- movement is key to avoiding attacks from enemies while still striking at them yourself. You can avoid enemy attacks by simply moving out of the way before the attack lands. By using clever tactics, you can survive many adversaries and come out unscathed and ready for the next fight. Invoke powerful spells to your advantage- there are many different beings at your disposal. Making use of their talents is the only way to come out successful, and to defeat even the strongest of enemies. In Moonrise, there are dozens of spells, each with wildly different uses, able to be enacted and used as how you see fit to command. State of the Game- This project is very deep into its development cycle now. There is a considerable amount of work that has been done to make the game playable, and as the game sits, it is currently in an Alpha state. There is still more work to be done- we have yet to finalize key features like a saving system, and have yet to get further into our desired open world elements. In addition, while we do have a lot of art done for the project, there is still some remaining, and we have a lot of animations we still need to create. Music and sound effects are the same story. But, as of right now, the game definitely plays like how we envisioned it- lots of tactical complexion backed up with a lot of intricate micro requiring you to not only think intelligently about what you are engaging, but also act swiftly before your units get overwhelmed and killed. Our current goal in regards to the project is to be able to release a playable game by 2020, or sooner if plausible. We may also consider releasing a Beta version of the game for many to play and test, given enough people are interested, but even with that there will be some time before we reach that point. Given the game’s current state, we believe that it would be beneficial to begin to show off the game to you all, the community. Let us know what you think of the project, just by simply typing a comment below. We’ll be happy to answer any questions regarding Moonrise. Thank you for viewing our page! Check us out on IndieDB: https://www.indiedb.com/games/moonrise
  10. Yesterday
  11. The Indie Showcase, Develop:Brighton’s annual competition to find the industry’s hottest new indie game, is now open for submissions. Developers can submit their games until 20 May here. Judged by a panel of industry experts, the Indie Showcase, sponsored by Xsolla, is a fantastic opportunity for up-and-coming developers to exhibit their latest game at Develop:Brighton. The competition is completely free to enter, with the top ten finalists securing an incredible chance to showcase their game to media, fellow developers, and potential publishers who attend the conference. All 10 shortlisted games will be featured in the Expo for visitors to play on Wednesday 10 July and Thursday 11 July at the Hilton Brighton Metropole during the conference. Finalists will also receive a three-day pass to Develop:Brighton, pre-event publicity, and a profile on the Develop:Brighton website. On Thursday 11 July, two finalists will be selected as the winners of the competition. The People’s Choice award will be decided by attendees, and the Overall Winner by a panel of judges. The winners will be announced during the final session on the final day of Develop:Brighton. In 2018 more than 100 titles entered the Indie Showcase, with popular parody golf physics simulator WHAT THE GOLF? and fast-paced arcade platformer Skybolt Zack elected the Overall and People’s Choice winners respectively. "Develop:Brighton was hands down the best B2B event we attended. As a new indie studio, the showcase gave us the opportunity to meet many publishers, compared to other events,” said Maxime Jehenne, Producer of Skybolt Zack. “You should definitely give the competition a try with a nice polished demo. The networking and the whole event is really worth the shot!" Another highlight from last year’s Indie Showcase was Tanglewood, a game developed on cartridge specifically for the SEGA Mega Drive, which went on to win the Game Development World Championship Fan Favourite award in 2018. The deadline for entries is Monday, 20 May 2019. Full entry details can be found at: https://www.developconference.com/indie-showcase-competition “At Xsolla we’re here to ensure the best ideas get made, get seen and get played,” said Aiman Seksembaeva, Director of Business Development at Indie Showcase sponsor Xsolla. “Supporting the Indie Showcase is a perfect fit for us and we can’t wait to see and play the games that get shortlisted.” The Judges Judging Panel Chair: Alistair Aitcheson - Indie Developer, Alistair Aitcheson Games Judges: Andrew Smith - Indie Developer, Spilt Milk Studios Bruce Slater - Indie Developer, Radical Forge Katie Goode - Director, Triangular Pixels Korina Abbott - Indie Videogame Marketeer, KAGames Phil Gaskell - Director, Ripstone Romana Ramzan - Lecturer in Games Design, Glasgow Caledonian University “I’m really excited to open up the submissions for this year’s Indie Showcase,” said panel chair Alistair Aitcheson of Alistair Aitcheson Games. “Last year we had some outstanding entries, full of wit and personality and resulting from incredible amounts of skill and dedication. I can’t wait to see what this year’s developers have to offer!” View full story
  12. The Indie Showcase, Develop:Brighton’s annual competition to find the industry’s hottest new indie game, is now open for submissions. Developers can submit their games until 20 May here. Judged by a panel of industry experts, the Indie Showcase, sponsored by Xsolla, is a fantastic opportunity for up-and-coming developers to exhibit their latest game at Develop:Brighton. The competition is completely free to enter, with the top ten finalists securing an incredible chance to showcase their game to media, fellow developers, and potential publishers who attend the conference. All 10 shortlisted games will be featured in the Expo for visitors to play on Wednesday 10 July and Thursday 11 July at the Hilton Brighton Metropole during the conference. Finalists will also receive a three-day pass to Develop:Brighton, pre-event publicity, and a profile on the Develop:Brighton website. On Thursday 11 July, two finalists will be selected as the winners of the competition. The People’s Choice award will be decided by attendees, and the Overall Winner by a panel of judges. The winners will be announced during the final session on the final day of Develop:Brighton. In 2018 more than 100 titles entered the Indie Showcase, with popular parody golf physics simulator WHAT THE GOLF? and fast-paced arcade platformer Skybolt Zack elected the Overall and People’s Choice winners respectively. "Develop:Brighton was hands down the best B2B event we attended. As a new indie studio, the showcase gave us the opportunity to meet many publishers, compared to other events,” said Maxime Jehenne, Producer of Skybolt Zack. “You should definitely give the competition a try with a nice polished demo. The networking and the whole event is really worth the shot!" Another highlight from last year’s Indie Showcase was Tanglewood, a game developed on cartridge specifically for the SEGA Mega Drive, which went on to win the Game Development World Championship Fan Favourite award in 2018. The deadline for entries is Monday, 20 May 2019. Full entry details can be found at: https://www.developconference.com/indie-showcase-competition “At Xsolla we’re here to ensure the best ideas get made, get seen and get played,” said Aiman Seksembaeva, Director of Business Development at Indie Showcase sponsor Xsolla. “Supporting the Indie Showcase is a perfect fit for us and we can’t wait to see and play the games that get shortlisted.” The Judges Judging Panel Chair: Alistair Aitcheson - Indie Developer, Alistair Aitcheson Games Judges: Andrew Smith - Indie Developer, Spilt Milk Studios Bruce Slater - Indie Developer, Radical Forge Katie Goode - Director, Triangular Pixels Korina Abbott - Indie Videogame Marketeer, KAGames Phil Gaskell - Director, Ripstone Romana Ramzan - Lecturer in Games Design, Glasgow Caledonian University “I’m really excited to open up the submissions for this year’s Indie Showcase,” said panel chair Alistair Aitcheson of Alistair Aitcheson Games. “Last year we had some outstanding entries, full of wit and personality and resulting from incredible amounts of skill and dedication. I can’t wait to see what this year’s developers have to offer!”
  13. U will find here: http://www.humus.name/index.php?page=3D and http://www.3dcpptutorials.sk/index.php?id=14
  14. Rule of thumb: initially, write all your classes as unrelated, even if they share a common function or two. Only introduce OOP relationships where and when it's clearly necessary. For example, if 4 out of 10 functions in the two classes are the same, that warrants the creation of a common ancestor.
  15. Today at Unreal Engine Build: Detroit ‘19, the latest stop in Epic Games’ series of bespoke events serving Unreal Engine enterprise customers, Magic Leap revealed that the company will provide 500 Magic Leap One Creator Edition spatial computing devices for giveaway as part of Epic MegaGrants. Announced last month, Epic MegaGrants is Epic Games’ $100 million initiative to support media and entertainment creators, game developers, enterprise professionals, students, educators, and tools developers doing amazing things with Unreal Engine or enhancing open-source capabilities for the 3D graphics community. Developers building Unreal Engine spatial computing applications across entertainment, architecture, automotive, healthcare and many other industries can apply now via online submission to receive Magic Leap One devices, free of charge. There is no deadline, with grants awarded on a rolling basis and hardware available on a first-come first-served basis, based on project merit. The Magic Leap One Creator Edition is currently available on magicleap.com, in select AT&T stores, and at AT&T online for $2,295. “The Epic MegaGrants program allows developers to pursue new goals and raise the bar for what they can accomplish, and we’re glad to support that mission by making Magic Leap One Creator Edition available to creators working in the spatial computing arena,” said Rio Caraeff, Chief Content Officer, Magic Leap. “Putting these devices directly into the hands of promising developers, along with the financial grant from Epic, will help accelerate the industry and lead to new innovation.” “We’re thrilled that Magic Leap is offering their support to the Epic MegaGrants program with this generous giveaway of 500 Magic Leap One Creator Edition devices, which offer incredible opportunities to explore applications from digital humans to product design,” said Simon Jones, Director, Unreal Engine Enterprise, Epic Games. “The option to receive this hardware as part of an Epic MegaGrant means that more of the funds can be available to spend in other areas, so developers have more financial flexibility and freedom to create.” For more information and to apply, visit https://www.unrealengine.com/megagrants.
  16. Today at Unreal Engine Build: Detroit ‘19, the latest stop in Epic Games’ series of bespoke events serving Unreal Engine enterprise customers, Magic Leap revealed that the company will provide 500 Magic Leap One Creator Edition spatial computing devices for giveaway as part of Epic MegaGrants. Announced last month, Epic MegaGrants is Epic Games’ $100 million initiative to support media and entertainment creators, game developers, enterprise professionals, students, educators, and tools developers doing amazing things with Unreal Engine or enhancing open-source capabilities for the 3D graphics community. Developers building Unreal Engine spatial computing applications across entertainment, architecture, automotive, healthcare and many other industries can apply now via online submission to receive Magic Leap One devices, free of charge. There is no deadline, with grants awarded on a rolling basis and hardware available on a first-come first-served basis, based on project merit. The Magic Leap One Creator Edition is currently available on magicleap.com, in select AT&T stores, and at AT&T online for $2,295. “The Epic MegaGrants program allows developers to pursue new goals and raise the bar for what they can accomplish, and we’re glad to support that mission by making Magic Leap One Creator Edition available to creators working in the spatial computing arena,” said Rio Caraeff, Chief Content Officer, Magic Leap. “Putting these devices directly into the hands of promising developers, along with the financial grant from Epic, will help accelerate the industry and lead to new innovation.” “We’re thrilled that Magic Leap is offering their support to the Epic MegaGrants program with this generous giveaway of 500 Magic Leap One Creator Edition devices, which offer incredible opportunities to explore applications from digital humans to product design,” said Simon Jones, Director, Unreal Engine Enterprise, Epic Games. “The option to receive this hardware as part of an Epic MegaGrant means that more of the funds can be available to spend in other areas, so developers have more financial flexibility and freedom to create.” For more information and to apply, visit https://www.unrealengine.com/megagrants. View full story
  17. Today, the Substance team unveils the first Substance Painter update of 2019, reconfirming its commitment to artists of all skill levels through a host of new features requested by users. Leveraging Substance’s unmatched R&D, today’s new features will help speed up the creation process by utilizing dynamic painting, material blending, real-time sculpting and more, all without sacrificing quality. After debuting a prototype at Substance Days at GDC, displacement mapping and tessellation are now both available directly through the Substance Painter realtime viewport and in Iray. With the addition of tessellation and displacement, artists now sculpt their mesh and textures at an infinitesimal level, chiseling art in real-time. Today’s update also introduces “Dynamic Strokes,” a new way to paint complex materials and environments. With Dynamic Strokes, brushes evolve over time to increase the uniqueness of a 3D asset, using an artist’s own parametric directions to guide it. Rather than painting each individual leaf and branch of an ivy vine, placing a single ivy asset will see the vegetation expand into lush overgrowth. A footprint in the sand can quickly become a trail walking off into the distance, and that’s just the start. Dynamic Strokes can help to create manicured patterns or randomly placed expansion, all within set parameters. Time cues can also be factored in, helping brushes to fade out, change color and morph depending on how long an artist has been painting. The new feature ships with 20 preset assets, and artists are encouraged to create their own. Along with the Dynamic Strokes, the update also brings a simple way to blend and layer materials using height data using the “Compare Mask” effect. Artists can now compare the content of the current layer they are working on with the previous layer, then blend the two. This works with any channel in an artist’s texture set, and when paired with the “Seamless Material” template, can create tileable environments faster than ever before. “2019 is going to be a big year for Substance Painter. We are full steam ahead on development, and this first update is a sign of our continued ambition,” said Jeremie Nogur, Director of Strategy Entertainment. "The new update delivers on requests by industry leaders, from games to product design, as well as our indie and hobbyist community." Additional features include: New Projection Modes – Spherical and Planar projections have been added, expanding the options for the Fill layers; Decal movement has been simplified as well. Radial Symmetry – The Symmetry tool now features a radial option, making it easier than ever to create new geometric shapes, including complex spirographs. Layer Stack – Photoshop-like Eyeballs are now available in the layer stack, so artists can easily turn layers on and off. Texture Set List – Users can now select and change the resolution of multiple texture sets at once. Channels List – Users can now press the Alt key and click on a channel to single it out, then click it again to reactivate all channels. Dithering Override – In response to a request from users, the option to override dithering has been added. New Content – New effects, alphas, filters, materials and two new environment maps have been added. The Substance Painter update is available now at no cost to Substance subscribers. Pricing/Availability The new update to Substance Painter is available today. Following the 30-day trial period, individual users will be able to subscribe to the Substance Indie or Pro plans. Substance Painter is also available for individual-license purchase, which includes 12 months of maintenance. Subscriptions to Substance Indie cost $19.90/month; Pro plans cost $99.90/month. Enterprise and education pricing is available upon request. Students and teachers can request a license at no cost.
  18. Today, the Substance team unveils the first Substance Painter update of 2019, reconfirming its commitment to artists of all skill levels through a host of new features requested by users. Leveraging Substance’s unmatched R&D, today’s new features will help speed up the creation process by utilizing dynamic painting, material blending, real-time sculpting and more, all without sacrificing quality. After debuting a prototype at Substance Days at GDC, displacement mapping and tessellation are now both available directly through the Substance Painter realtime viewport and in Iray. With the addition of tessellation and displacement, artists now sculpt their mesh and textures at an infinitesimal level, chiseling art in real-time. Today’s update also introduces “Dynamic Strokes,” a new way to paint complex materials and environments. With Dynamic Strokes, brushes evolve over time to increase the uniqueness of a 3D asset, using an artist’s own parametric directions to guide it. Rather than painting each individual leaf and branch of an ivy vine, placing a single ivy asset will see the vegetation expand into lush overgrowth. A footprint in the sand can quickly become a trail walking off into the distance, and that’s just the start. Dynamic Strokes can help to create manicured patterns or randomly placed expansion, all within set parameters. Time cues can also be factored in, helping brushes to fade out, change color and morph depending on how long an artist has been painting. The new feature ships with 20 preset assets, and artists are encouraged to create their own. Along with the Dynamic Strokes, the update also brings a simple way to blend and layer materials using height data using the “Compare Mask” effect. Artists can now compare the content of the current layer they are working on with the previous layer, then blend the two. This works with any channel in an artist’s texture set, and when paired with the “Seamless Material” template, can create tileable environments faster than ever before. “2019 is going to be a big year for Substance Painter. We are full steam ahead on development, and this first update is a sign of our continued ambition,” said Jeremie Nogur, Director of Strategy Entertainment. "The new update delivers on requests by industry leaders, from games to product design, as well as our indie and hobbyist community." Additional features include: New Projection Modes – Spherical and Planar projections have been added, expanding the options for the Fill layers; Decal movement has been simplified as well. Radial Symmetry – The Symmetry tool now features a radial option, making it easier than ever to create new geometric shapes, including complex spirographs. Layer Stack – Photoshop-like Eyeballs are now available in the layer stack, so artists can easily turn layers on and off. Texture Set List – Users can now select and change the resolution of multiple texture sets at once. Channels List – Users can now press the Alt key and click on a channel to single it out, then click it again to reactivate all channels. Dithering Override – In response to a request from users, the option to override dithering has been added. New Content – New effects, alphas, filters, materials and two new environment maps have been added. The Substance Painter update is available now at no cost to Substance subscribers. Pricing/Availability The new update to Substance Painter is available today. Following the 30-day trial period, individual users will be able to subscribe to the Substance Indie or Pro plans. Substance Painter is also available for individual-license purchase, which includes 12 months of maintenance. Subscriptions to Substance Indie cost $19.90/month; Pro plans cost $99.90/month. Enterprise and education pricing is available upon request. Students and teachers can request a license at no cost. View full story
  19. VS2015: Sin_FreeGlutOpenGL11Cpp.zip (Everything has been set up already. Just download, select your version of VS in "General/Platform Toolset" in the project settings and run) Release: Sin_x86_EXE.zip Tools: Visual Studio 2015 "Win32 Console Application" FreeGLUT deprecated/legacy OpenGL 1.1 (docs: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/desktop/opengl/opengl) Settings main.cpp
  20. Tom Sloper

    Fantasy MMORPG in Development

    Yes. I recommend the OP edit the post, add line breaks. (It's UX design.)
  21. Prototype

    Mature themes on a game I'm working on

    There is no way you can touch these subjects without upsetting a lot of people. Especially in these days where people seem to be overly sensitive and prepared to gang-up on you on social media or screw up your Steam ratings. If you want to stir up controversy that's okay but you have to be prepared for some hot wind. Personally I wouldn't even go there within a mile radius.
  22. DerTroll

    Mature themes on a game I'm working on

    From my personal point of view, I think it is okay to address such topics, especially in a horror game, as long as rape and other very horrible things are not shown explicitly. However, you should keep in mind that hard topics can easily backfire on you if somebody feels insulted and that sometimes happens faster than expected and gets ugly quick... Greetings
  23. Hello Guys, I created a funny uv mirror x effect with uv.x > 0.5, uv.x = 1.0f - uv.x but if i translate the uvs before i lost my mirror effect. So have any math genius a solution how to keep the mirror effect if i translate my uvs before? Greets
  24. DerTroll

    can not link program

    Glad I could help a bit. Good luck with your project
  25. r1ckparker

    Perfect Circle

    Sin and Cos are a programmers best friend! I was looking at other games for inspiration and I saw this image from r-type A circle of aliens spins around the player and you have to shoot them from the inside. To calculate the points of a circle is quite easy, the calculation is - x=(radius*cos(angle)) y=(radius*sin(angle)) Therefore I have an array of 10 objects which is calculated as follows - cx=(230*cos(i*36)) cy=(230*sin(i*36)) 230 pixels from the 'origin' and I have 10 objects - 360/10=36. I is incremented by 1 each step. I now have a nice circle of aliens, I can increase the number by reducing the number 36. I can make the circle smaller or larger by increasing the radius. The first level is more or less complete, with boss monster at the end. On to the second level!
  26. stalker#3829

    AngelScript 2.33.1: Bugs && Features

    Another confusion with multiple inheritance: baseOffset not applied to auxiliary object. Here's an example (stub): ... // C++ part class A { public: int SomeWorkA(int a) { printf("A::SomeWorkA | %lx | %i\n", this, aa); return a; } int aa = 33; }; class B { public: int SomeWorkB(int b) { printf("B::SomeWorkB | %lx | %i\n", this, bb); return b; } int bb = 44; }; class C: public A, public B { }; C* c = new C; // enough for the purpose of example c->SomeWorkA(0); // prints A::SomeWorkA | 5555d132e3e0 | 33 c->SomeWorkB(0); // prints B::SomeWorkB | 5555d132e3e4 | 44 #if 1 r = engine->RegisterGlobalFunction("int someWork(int)", asMETHODPR(C, SomeWorkB, (int), int), asCALL_THISCALL_ASGLOBAL, c); assert(r >= 0); #else r = engine->RegisterGlobalFunction("int someWork(int)", asMETHODPR(C, SomeWorkB, (int), int), asCALL_THISCALL_ASGLOBAL, (B*)c); assert(r >= 0); #endif ... // script part someWork(0); ... And the output: r = engine->RegisterGlobalFunction(..., c); A::SomeWorkA | 5555d132e3e0 | 33 B::SomeWorkB | 5555d132e3e4 | 44 calling someWork(0) from script: B::SomeWorkB | 5555d132e3e0 | 33 r = engine->RegisterGlobalFunction(..., (B*)c); A::SomeWorkA | 5555d1320350 | 33 B::SomeWorkB | 5555d1320354 | 44 calling someWork(0) from script: B::SomeWorkB | 5555d1320354 | 44 So for correct execution the class should be explicitly casted to the correct base one during global function registration, which was not clear to me and may be a bug (baseOffset not applied to auxiliary object). Sidenote: I've managed to setup AS+JIT+AATC. AATC uses reference counters through multiple inheritance. BlindMind's JIT also has bug with methods from multiple inheritance: doesn't apply baseOffset with gcc, but that's another topic.
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