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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

destron

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  1. I would take you up on your offer, but I'm not looking to spend that much yet, and I'm not a student. :\
  2. Hey, music has 'intrigued' me for a while, and I've been searching around for free VST hosts/sequencers/etc, and have finally come to the conclusion that I'm going to have to pay for what I really want. I've tried free programs like Psycle (which I currently use), but none really seems to have the power and ease-of-use of programs like FL Studio and Acid. Right now, I'm not looking for something top-of-the-line (read: not Logic Pro), but something that can create good-quality audio. At this point, I'm pretty much set on either FL Studio "FruityLoops" Edition ($99), or Sony's Acid Music Studio ($59). If you have any other suggestions, please post them. :) From what I can tell, Acid Music Studio is more for hobbyists (it seems to focus on music creation through pre-made loops). FL Studio seems more like what I want, and relies more on samples and has better built-in software synthesizers. What do you guys think?
  3. Whee! http://bancomicsans.com/home.html
  4. Quote:Original post by cemedias As a side note: I don't know why, but neither HL2 or HL scared me at all. They seemed more funny lol. Yes, although I love Half-Life 2, this is very true. I think the designers were more aiming for (or aimed for the the opposite but missed) a more "ewww gross!" style than monsters popping out behind your character and scaring the sh*t out of you. Also, Half-Life 2 (and the sequels (I'm totally looking forward to episode 2)) are more aimed at cinematic quality (both in music and art), which is something I think that Doom3 and is a bit shallow on. When you think about it, Half-Life 2 is a LOT more realistic than Doom3, especially on the subject of monsters and monster placement. Although Doom3 was cool, the "monster closet trick" got a bit too old by then end of the game. If there were zombies in real life, they wouldn't be able to seal themselves behind a wall and pop out when you walk by. The cinematic stuff, however, that I really loved about Doom3 is the music stingers. There's not much in the way of ambient music, but I just love the part where you're in the infirmary and the patient zombie sits up on the bed and there's that awesome orchestra stinger. That was totally sweet. The actual music in Half-Life 2 is awesome, though, and it really gets your blood running (more than Doom 3 anyway). Anyway, enough of Half-Life2 and Doom3, here's some fun horror tips applicable almost anywhere. First, horror movies are NOTHING without a soundtrack. Music stingers and such really shock people and bring out the nerve-popping. Second, sometimes you need to leave things to the player's imagination. Make sure that it is evident in the way NPC's act that something bad is going on. Things like blood trails, dents in the wall, and overturned tables make a good suggestion of what took place in a room. Third, Silence is golden. If the player is walking around with nothing happening, he's bound to get scared wondering when the next monster will pop out.
  5. Alright, here's my take on it. The biggest things I'm going to pop you for are the graphics. Don't mean to be rude, but I hope you're going to use something other than these in the final product. Anyway, on to the actual design of the game. Art: First, I will say that you have some nice GUI and character art. The paintings of the characters as seen in the inventory screens and such are pretty nice. I also like the logo, which is kind of cool. The actual on-screen characters seem a little bitty and pixelated, and don't fit in well with the aforementioned graphics tileset. Sound: The game doesn't have much in the way of sound effects, so I'll go on to the music. I thought that the ambient music in the game needs to be a little quieter, and that you should add some kind of background sounds according to the environment (cave = dripping water, echoey-type sounds, etc). The one thing that I really did not like was the battle scene music. It seemed very obtrusive and obnoxious, not to mention way too loud. Controls: Although the GUI graphics are nice, I disliked the controls. They seemed non-standard and somewhat hard to use, and I felt like I didn't have very much control. I highly suggest incorporating mouse movement into the game, instead of all-keyboard controlling. A few other things: - As far as stability, although I wasn't playing it for that long, I had no crashes and the game itself played very smoothly. - If you're planning on eventually releasing a final version (I assume you are), then you should probably pack the game files into an installer rather than just a zip with a directory in it. - Your site is very slick and well-laid out. - I love the main menu painting. Very cool. :) Anyway, that's my $0.02. I don't mean to be rude or condescending by my criticisms here, so please don't take offense. : Keep going, keep improving, and you just might make something really awesome out of this. :)
  6. Hmmm, I think the first part about using the battle to introduce the gameplay is a good idea, but beware! If you eventually make this game and release a demo, make sure the demo is not the introductory battle, since people who play the demo and don't really read up on the game itself might think the whole game is going to be on the battlefield. Just a thought. I love the part about scalpels, saws, and needles though. :D And then instead of medpacks or whatever you could use stims and adrenalin needles. :P
  7. HtH combat is hard in an FPS, since depth perception is distorted within FPS systems (IMO). It's getting better as technology improves, but I think for now we should stick to third-person HtH, since you actually get a perspective on the scene and the relation of distance between characters. Alright, now this part is if you're already chosen to make an FPS: If you're looking at the system itself (i.e. moves and combos etc), then what you've got going sounds OK, but you'll need to have some kind of training module within the game; I don't think there's a lot of people that could just jump into it. Also, if you're thinking of doing some kind of swords/fencing thing, then all I can say is good luck. I don't know a lot about swordplay, but I think there's a lot more to it than what it looks like. There's probably several different kinds of blocks and parries for different kinds of attacks. Eventually it'd come to a point where it's too confusing to learn how to play it. Your point about Half-Life crowbar fights should be well taken. While still fun (to some people); Crowbar fights, Knife fights (for counter-strike fans), and the like always seem to boil down to the same tactic: "Jump forward, Attack, Jump back," which is hardly realistic. Good luck with this, but I think you're going to have to go with a "more fun" approach, instead of a "more realistic" idea.
  8. Check this out - http://www.d-lusion.com/HelpDrumstation2.html It's really easy to use, really. :)
  9. Well, maybe you should consider sizing up your game res, then... 300x300 just seems tiny tiny to me. It does seem kinda dark to me; you might want to accentuate the head and maybe the feet and hands with a lighter shade of grey or light blue.
  10. Personally, I think that 12x12's are waaaayyyy too small. But I will second what Gyrthrok said - use more contrast, don't use colors that are too close to each other on the spectrum. Brighten it up a little. :)
  11. Well, before I go on with that, do you think the first-person perspective on the story is a good idea?
  12. Well, I was thinking of a twist at the end as sort of a "loose end" for a sequel or the next episode (depending on what type of game release I want). In fact, I'd love to do an episodic game - you can keep building on the last one, sort of like a TV show or something.
  13. Well, I kinda wanted to stray away from the player being "almost" mutated or killed - I didn't really want to copy other games like the ones you mentioned. I don't know if I want to do something where the player gets infected during the game, if at any time - it would be almost contrived I suppose. Also, what do you guys think about a "trick" twist ending... where maybe the player thinks all along that he is OK and at the end he founds out he's on the first stage of infection?
  14. OK, this is my little story, I haven't worked out all the details yet. It's more of a blurb than I story I guess, but I'll try to keep this as interesting as possible. Here we go. It basically fleshes out the backstory and motivations of the player, as well as the goal of the game. What I'm worried about is the "climax"; I'm not exactly sure what to do about a "final challenge" or a boss character. I made it first person, hopefully that'll make it a little bit more interesting. :) ---- Today is going to be the worst day of my life. I have been assigned to go to the Cathedral. No, you misunderstand. Not for a confession. Not for Mass. Not even to pray. Here, I'll give you some background. Since 2083, humans have been fighting an unknown hostile force that seems endless. Some say that they are aliens bent on human destruction, some say that they are simply humans mutated by a strange disease. I don't know what to say. All I know is that they're against us and we're fighting for our lives. We call our safe houses and routes from one place to another the Underground Railroad - if you only you knew how literal that term was. Our network of sewers and tunnels stretch for miles just under the surface of the Earth. In our sector, we've blocked all other entrances, and now we have only one way out of our hiding place - a secret passage under an old Cathedral. My mission? I was told I needed to make my way through the city and into the country where there has rumoured to have been another resistance camp, nestled just under an old ammunitions depot. Who knows if I'll make it or not, but I'm going to at least try. I will do anything for the human race. Even if it means risking my life to save it. ---- What do you guys think? I'd like some constructive criticism, and while I urge you to point out the story's flaws, please don't give me the "that sucks so bad" stuff.
  15. Hey, I've been getting started with programming (C++), and so I was wondering how far you guys were along with it when you started making games. In this case games can be a relative term, but I was mostly thinking of when you added controls to a program that displayed 2d/3d graphics.