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BLiTZWiNG

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About BLiTZWiNG

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  1. I think he's posting from 2004.
  2. Wow active worlds is still going? holy ****.
  3. [quote name='Alpha_ProgDes' timestamp='1338908730' post='4946466'] This may sound weird. But I wouldn't mind controlling my PC through my tablet. Granted, it would make my tablet the most expensive keyboard in the world, IMO, the idea is cool anyway. And no, I don't mean remote desktop. [/quote] I actually want that photoshop control interface for ipad. I only just recently got an ipad and just thought of it. I wish more apps/games had that kind of thing. I have a Samsung Galaxy Note (1200x800 res) and I'd love to use it as a touch interface for games, like a custom action bar for say SWTOR or WOW), as an extra control after the keyboard of course. It's getting more like a drawing tablet.
  4. [quote name='way2lazy2care' timestamp='1338859937' post='4946277'] [quote name='BLiTZWiNG' timestamp='1338851607' post='4946257'] I think you're mistaking me for some kind of hater, but I guess that could be construed from the type of post this is. I'm with SillyCow, in that a massive change like this, in this day and age, should be accompanied with loads of hints, or be completely intuitive. Android was about 75% intuitive for me, having never used a touch screen phone before, I got most of it within seconds, but there was definitely some confusion about what would happen when I touched certain icons if I didn't get what they represented. Windows 8 has been about 25% intuitive, and it feels incredibly frustrating to have to resort to the keyboard to switch apps or get back to the start menu, or just see the time. For completeness, the iPad was about 25% intuitive as well. I had to ask our Apple person for correct gestures, but after that they make sense, though I forget some of them occaisonally, but that is because I use Android daily, not iDevices.[/quote] That's a reasonable position to have. It's definitely different. Sorry I mistook you for being more extreme than you meant to be, and I'm sorry if I came off more extreme than I mean to be. I just get tired of people saying that Windows 8 is bad for not having features it definitely has or not giving any reasons at all other than it being different. Microsoft definitely has some polishing to do, and definitely has a significant hurdle in training new users. I have to believe they're on top of this though, because these problems are just so obvious and significant that they have to be dealt with. For the most part though, I still think the interface is a step forward for the average consumer without making too many sacrifices for the outliers.[/quote] I'm usually a bit of a Microsoft fanboi. I love C# and it's all I want to program in, though I'm not shy to criticize a flaw (like alerts or new apps popping up over the current window you happen to be typing a password into, my god, plzfixnow kthxbye!) I can see this being really great on a tablet device and I will be grabbing one as soon as it comes out, but at present, I can't see myself replacing Windows 7 on my desktop PC with this unless they come out with some other fantastic feature that I must have, because, I don't believe killing off overlapping windows is a good idea at all. I know they will still be there, but they are trying to get me to like metro, and without that I just can't like it (on a PC).
  5. [quote name='szecs' timestamp='1338794373' post='4946024'] Alone or not, we had a thread about this (more precisely a thread that turned to be about this), which ended in a war, so I guess people are a bit tired of the topic. [/quote] Yeah, I should have looked a bit harder before I posted, though was surprised to see no flame war on the front page. I certainly don't want to start one, and it's clear that people are passionate about their different opinions. I hope Microsoft address many of the concerns I am experiencing and have read about, and I realise this is not the final product, but in my experience, the UI rarely changes much in the last year before release.
  6. [quote name='way2lazy2care' timestamp='1338823045' post='4946136'] [quote name='BLiTZWiNG' timestamp='1338788085' post='4946013'] The problem as I see it is it's a huge change in usability, and it seems more like a sideways change, rather than a leap forward. Yes I am certain there will be kewl new features (like a zoomable desktop and synchronized settings), but at the moment that only allows me to fit all of the extremely and pointlessly large tiles on the screen at once. [/quote] The problem is that a sideways change was required. There is only so far you can push the existing desktop model, and it doesn't scale at all well to NUI interfaces. Just like every change, people will complain because it is different, but technology and hardware is changing and software needs to adapt to those changes also. [quote]These new large tiles are not displaying me any extra information, so there is no reason for them to be so large. I don't see the death of overlapped windows as a good thing either.[/quote] How can you say there is not more information on the tiles? That's patently false. [img]http://www.inewsgy.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/windows8home-5179598.jpg[/img] [quote]How does scrolling sideways with a vertical mouse wheel feel at all natural? Well it doesn't to me anyway. Now, if they added left click + drag, I could probably get used to that quite quickly, as that is working like a tablet device and makes sense.[/quote] There is a scroll bar on the bottom of the screen you can click and drag also. I don't really find scrolling sideways unnatural; there are existing applications that do the same thing, so it just doesn't bug me that much. Honestly if scrolling confusing you is a sticking point for functionality, maybe it's a good thing you're being forced out of your comfort zone. This kind or issue suggests a much more insidious problem imo; either that you have already decided to dislike Windows 8 and are looking for any reason to be vindicated, or you really can't adapt using a scroll wheel as a horizontal scrolling device, which feels worse to me. edit: @ SillyCow: I think that's going to be the hardest part for Windows 8. The functionality that most people want is there, the problem is teaching people where that functionality is. It's a non-trivial hurdle and something I hope Microsoft addresses. [/quote] I think you're mistaking me for some kind of hater, but I guess that could be construed from the type of post this is. I'm with SillyCow, in that a massive change like this, in this day and age, should be accompanied with loads of hints, or be completely intuitive. Android was about 75% intuitive for me, having never used a touch screen phone before, I got most of it within seconds, but there was definitely some confusion about what would happen when I touched certain icons if I didn't get what they represented. Windows 8 has been about 25% intuitive, and it feels incredibly frustrating to have to resort to the keyboard to switch apps or get back to the start menu, or just see the time. For completeness, the iPad was about 25% intuitive as well. I had to ask our Apple person for correct gestures, but after that they make sense, though I forget some of them occaisonally, but that is because I use Android daily, not iDevices. Scrolling sideways makes sense on a tablet, not so much on a desktop. That's not the sticking point though, the sticking point is the "ease of access" to my computer that I currently have with Windows 7 and have had with every previous version of Windows, that is now gone. That is not a change for the better no matter how you look at it. Also, most of the information on the start menu is actually off my display area, when I have a 24" monitor. No previous version of Windows has this problem. Edit: Actually the biggest sticking point for me is the lack of windows in.. uh, Windows. If this were an operating system purely for a tablet, I'd say yeah, it's good. Not great, but good. Now, as for my claim about tiles, It's not patently false at all. [url="http://croppy.me/zpk17tjr.png"]http://croppy.me/zpk17tjr.png[/url]
  7. The problem as I see it is it's a huge change in usability, and it seems more like a sideways change, rather than a leap forward. Yes I am certain there will be kewl new features (like a zoomable desktop and synchronized settings), but at the moment that only allows me to fit all of the extremely and pointlessly large tiles on the screen at once. These new large tiles are not displaying me any extra information, so there is no reason for them to be so large. I don't see the death of overlapped windows as a good thing either. How does scrolling sideways with a vertical mouse wheel feel at all natural? Well it doesn't to me anyway. Now, if they added left click + drag, I could probably get used to that quite quickly, as that is working like a tablet device and makes sense. I'm going to miss my clock in the bottom right of the screen. I wonder if watch manufacturers are behind this, since Windows 95 I haven't needed a watch. Yeah ok that's pretty far fetched, but it annoys me none the less. All I can say is at first glance, it looks and feels terrible. Windows 7, as soon as I learnt I could reduce the size of the stupidly oversized task bar, I loved it. It's far from perfect but it certainly improved on Vista and XP. Windows 8 has simply frustrated me no end. Clearly I am alone in this opinion, which is what I was trying to find out.
  8. [quote name='Alpha_ProgDes' timestamp='1338780183' post='4945999'] I also thought that the tiles flip revealing more information about the app. [/quote] Not that I can see. Also, how the hell do I go back when I open a page?
  9. [quote name='way2lazy2care' timestamp='1338778561' post='4945993'] [quote name='BLiTZWiNG' timestamp='1338776990' post='4945988'] What is so bad is the complete back flip in usability. Having to use the keyboard to get to the desktop, going through several layers of menus to find an app[/quote] Hit the windows key and type the name of whichever application you want to run or use [url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8vPpR_70BA"]semantic zoom/app groups[/url] (ctrl + mouse wheel).[/quote] This kind of highlights my point. Hitting the windows key (which for me does not bring up a search box) to find an app where prior I could just click the start button and click in the search box. Why hide this feature? I have no idea what a semantic zoom/app group is, and I'm not sure how you expect a new user to work this out without being told or reading a manual, because it sure ain't obvious. [quote] [quote]Scrolling sideways is just not intuitive on a PC[/quote] iirc any mouse with a scroll wheel uses it to scroll left and right by default and ctrl + mouse wheel to use semantic zoom as mentioned above.[/quote] How is this better than what we have? [quote][quote]and the whole idea of wasting my screen space with huge tiles that tell me nothing and forcing me to scroll. No helpful names or tooltips, no intuitive mouse usage. I can't see myself moving to this OS, unless I can use VS on a tablet.[/quote] The idea is that the "huge tiles" won't tell you nothing. They can convey more useful information to the user than an icon ever could. [/quote] Wait, it sounds like you're saying exactly what I said, though I doubt you intended that. I've worked out how to get a settings menu to pop up like Android has when you hit the menu button on the home screen, but it's very hard to get it to pop up and stay up, and certainly not obvious in any way. The tiles are huge and waste screen space telling me absolutely nothing about the app, just a big old block of wasted pixels, conveying only as much info as an icon at 10x the size.
  10. It doesn't work in classic either, for two reasons, the first being it needs .net 3.5 (not pre-installed in the preview, but we can fix that) and secondly WinPCAP wont install on it. What is so bad is the complete back flip in usability. Having to use the keyboard to get to the desktop, going through several layers of menus to find an app or the power button. Scrolling sideways is just not intuitive on a PC, and the whole idea of wasting my screen space with huge tiles that tell me nothing and forcing me to scroll. No helpful names or tooltips, no intuitive mouse usage. I can't see myself moving to this OS, unless I can use VS on a tablet. I also can't see consumers reacting well to it when it's so hard to use at first and they already know how to use their current Windows. People may learn how to use it, but it will take time to get used to, and I don't think that is a good way to make a user interface.
  11. We've just been evaluating whether our software will work correctly on Windows 8, at the moment it wont, but that's not Microsoft's fault. What caught my attention however is the completely unintuitive user interface. I know I'm not the first to say this, but wow, way to make the user frustrated in no time flat! I can see how this is going to be great on a tablet device, but my god, if I have to use this on a PC I will personally hunt the person in charge of this disaster and force him to use it to perform all his daily tasks forever. I have to wonder if I am alone in this perception of the new interface.
  12. Very nice. I agree with Cody's question, but I assume it's probably because you're good at 2D. Out of interest sake, how long did it take you to paint say the stump, and some other things?
  13. Well while I agree with JTippets, the reason I asked for and got my money back was the fact it runs on a server system. I had no idea about this before I bought the game, I just assumed the usual bnet / solo separation. I physically cannont play the game, so no, any company that does this wont be getting my money. I can play WoW fine though, but I'm not going back there.
  14. I want to know what kind of economy a single player game has that requires them altering the loot table for me. Damn I'm glad I got my money back.
  15. desktop app != game