• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

programmermattc

GDNet+ Basic
  • Content count

    830
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

133 Neutral

About programmermattc

  • Rank
    GDNet+
  1. Other than some of the more standard locations (California), another spot in the US that's really growing with game dev is Texas (obvious when you look at that awesome map). I know of several game companies down there, some of which a few of my friends work for. Lots of companies seem to be migrating away from massive cities and more into scenic suburbs, places like Washington (Bungie, and (previously) Cyan). Another spot thats gaining studios is North Carolina where we've got Epic Games and the new Insomniac studio. These studios are near large cities but not near the size of something like LA or NY. For awhile there was rumor Madison, WI was growing as a game dev hub but I've come to doubt that considering the relatively mediocre performance of the Raven software games and Human Head games kind of changing to more of a board game company.
  2. I'm a big C#/Visual Studio developer with XNA and WP7's really interest me. I currently own an iPhone and never really got into the whole app thing (even just using them in general) however was always interested after seeing how early development with Windows mobile was a few years ago (before W7). Hopefully I'll be able to grab one in around 6 months when my iPhone contract is up, maybe they'll have some of their stuff more solidified by then. I am a bit nervous to adopt a relatively new tech for this company, they've been doing phones for awhile but this new phone OS is built to compete with iPhone so it's practically a new tech for them (and I've known MS to put a lot of time into something only to have it fizzle out in the end).
  3. Quote:Original post by Promit My digital documents are meticulously filed and rigorously backed up. I need to focus on a standard backup schedule. I've never experienced a large loss of virtual data, the most I ever lost was a corrupted 128 mb pen drive (even that kinda sucked). However, my dad just totally wracked one of my laptops with a virus so everything on there is gone...
  4. Quote:Original post by Dunge I'll add a few more if you accept older games: Silent Hill 2 is probably the best in your interest Condemned I second both these choices, and I suggest every game in the Silent Hill series except for 'The Room' which just doesn't seem to fit in the series quite as well as the others. I've only played the demo, but if you have a PS2 or PS3 there's a game called Siren: Blood Curse which seemed pretty terrifying. Make sure when you play you have high quality headphones, it'll make the experience much more terrifying. I've also noticed being closer to the screen actually makes it scarier (I've noticed PC translations are much more scary for me due to my distance to the monitor and the headphones I use). Any scary game can be bland if you're sitting halfway across the room with standard def audio.
  5. Thanks? It definitely is a great, highly-knowledgable community here which is why I stick to replying with answers in 'For Beginners'. I think the proof is in how long this community has been active, I've seen a lot of other game development forums start up and other fade away while this one has remained solid. Welcome to the site.
  6. I am having an issue in an asteroids-style game where theplayer will pass the screen borders and the code makes them appear on the opposite screen edge (for example, passing too far to the right makes you appear on the left). However, it seems like the movement vector I use to define which was to go gets all messed up until I rotate and fly around for awhile. Here is some of my ship rotation code where I believe the issue is happening: private void UpdateRotationData(KeyboardState kbs) { if (kbs.IsKeyDown(Keys.A)) { this.Rotation -= MathHelper.ToRadians(5); float translatedRot = MathHelper.ToRadians(MathHelper.ToDegrees (this.Rotation) + 240); Matrix transform = new Matrix(); transform = Matrix.CreateTranslation(new Vector3(this.Position, 1.0f)) * Matrix.CreateRotationZ(translatedRot); _movementDir = Vector2.Transform(_movementDir, transform); _movementDir.Normalize(); } if (kbs.IsKeyDown(Keys.D)) { this.Rotation += MathHelper.ToRadians(5); float translatedRot = MathHelper.ToRadians(MathHelper.ToDegrees (this.Rotation) + 240); Matrix transform = new Matrix(); transform = Matrix.CreateTranslation(new Vector3(this.Position, 1.0f)) * Matrix.CreateRotationZ(translatedRot); _movementDir = Vector2.Transform(_movementDir, transform); _movementDir.Normalize(); } } The 240 offset in the rotation is compensation for the movement vector (which, while typing this I realized a solution for). Does anyone see why, if the this.Position changes to the other side of the screen, the transformation of this vector wouldn't work properly?
  7. You can find out some simple details about the game HERE. Also here's an early screenshot of the main menu (MP has since been removed): Also if you YouTube 'ProjectAmbush' or 'RhinoXNA' you might find a very early video. I'll get you some more screens and video this weekend.
  8. After a few months of development I've completed the core work for Ambush, an Asteroids-style game developed using my open source library RhinoXNA. You can find the game HERE. Simply run setup.exe to get started. There are some refinements that need to be done, mostly with ship speed, asteroid speed, and other little gameplay tweaks. The asteroids need the most work as they always spawn in the same area and the collision is wacky sometimes. Hope you like it, and leave me some comments on what I should fix!
  9. As we're approaching fall, all things spooky begin invading our televisions and movie theaters. What better time than now to list your top 5 favorite spooky/horror/psychological games? 1) Silent Hill 2 2) Condemned 3) Fear 4) Silent Hill 5) Saw Post your favorite top 5's below. No restrictions on your lists (maybe a game is scary because it's so bad?)
  10. Quote:Original post by Tom Sloper You're looking for the easy answer. You're hoping your mini-poll won't come up with the correct answer: "do both." I question your passion for creating games, since you asked if you can take a break from pursuing your supposed passion. The tone in my first post may have been somewhat incorrect. I'm currently planning on going forward by doing both, in fact I've had the idea for the next project for quite some time and have started designing it. I was just curious what others are doing and what they've seen (if focusing on one makes the other suffer when looking at the job hunt versus personal/portfolio projects). However, if I had to choose between a game dev job and working on a personal project that I have an interest in, I'd easily choose the game job. Unless quitting my job is considered having a passion, I like to think I have a passion for making games. Working 40 hours a week and then focusing on game programming and development several hours every night (more on the weekends) I think shows some passion. I could be like most other people and say I want a game job because I play games but I prefer to see myself as a bit more passionate.
  11. I've always been developing personal projects in my spare time however I'm getting to the point where I feel after my current project winds down I'll have a solid portfolio and will begin the game job hunt (I currently work in a non-game related industry). I'm wondering whether I should start another personal project or if I should concentrate on the job hunt. If I concentrate on the hunt I might be able to refine my resume/portfolio and apply to more places. However, if I don't get a game-related job, I may end up with an out of date portfolio. The other option is to do both, job hunt and work on my personal projects but then both are sharing the 'spotlight' instead of a single one being my focus. What do you guys think, continue to develop my portfolio as I'm hunting?
  12. Apparently someone just created shoes that lace themselves up like in Back to the Future 2. Yeah, I'm easily entertained.
  13. I talked with him and he elaborated what I should do further. He had a lot of differing ways to do this but essentially boiled down to a singleton. My problem I had a Level class that held a list of sprites, then I would draw all sprites for the current level. Well, none of this made any sense considering I have a restriction that you can only have 1 level loaded at a time. It makes more sense to have just a giant list of entities that get rendered and I can load/reload that list when I need to. What I finally ended up with was a Singleton that holds all my sprites and all of the sprites in it just get rendered by the level. I had completely blanked and forgot that getting the instance in a singleton is a static call which is why I didn't understand how to call it. @Zahlman, I wouldn't be able to pass it in as a seperate parameter because the update call is overridden and I would have to change both the subclass as well as the base class and all inheriting classes.
  14. I'm working on an asteroids clone and I've found an issue with the way my code is structured. Here's the setup: I have a SpaceLevel class that contains 2 lists, a list of Projectiles and a list of other drawables. The list of other drawables contains the player which is simply updated and rendered like all other drawables. However, in my update method I want to request a new projectile be created when the user fires. At this point I have no reference back to the level from the ship class so I'm not sure what I should do... A developer friend of mine mentioned I need some kind of 'create object' class that should be used throughout my code. Does anyone know what he's referring to or any references I can look at to solve this problem?
  15. I think it's going to be difficult to get away from looking like every other game unless you do some of your own programming (whether it's you or a developer on your team). For this, I would suggest C# and XNA, while you won't be able to develop for Steam, you will be able to develop for the Xbox 360. I would suggest posting in the Help Wanted forums looking for a technical designer or a lead programmer. Typically, most programmers know of different 'flavors' of programming languages and tools and having someone on your team that can suggest one direction or another would be an invaluable resource. Good luck!