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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

GMuser

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  1. Wow, people think there is even a remote chance that we are near the technology to send people to colonise mars? We struggled to land a robot with government funding, and now $400,000 of crowdfunding is going to get us there?   The biggest problem I see is the fact that Spiro is talking as though landing on mars and settling there is a sure thing. The simple truth is, attempting it with this organisation of crack-pots is suicide. This talk of settlement is nothing short of dellusional and I would recommend an 8 year trip to a psychologist instead.   Internet? It would be worse than 14.4k, and even less reliable. But who cares, if you have no earthly attachments. You can set up your own internet when you are on mars. You and the three other people in the first landing (pretending as though that won't be a crash landing, pretending as though it will ever launch).
  2. It could be some kind of bad overclock. Check if the overdrive options are enabled in the performance tab of Catalyst Control Centre, if so try disabling it. 
  3. I am a relative newbie and from my experience so far (I own FL Studio) you can always find a place for a new plugin. I use vsts for instruments, effects and midi control-- a lot of the plugins I use are freeware. VST is a very common format for plugins, and I would expect vst1/2 with 32bit support in any capable DAW. There are also 64bit plugins and vst3, but I haven't had much success with those yet, or even encountered situations where there wasn't a vst1/2 32bit version (your DAW needs to have support for 64 bit plugins to use them, either natively or via a bridge).   When I was on the market for a DAW, I had no previous experience on the topic. I did have a copy of some old/light version of Sonar which I tried for about 2 seconds before I was convinced that I didn't want anything to do with that. Although of course I would recommend people to try demos before they buy, I personally didn't want to clutter my PC with crap and couldn't commit myself to fairly evaluating any time limited trial versions. It was quite realistic that I could go a month without trying and lose the chance. My decision came down to researching other peoples experiences and trying to gain a perspective of what a DAW is and what to expect for my budget. FL studio seemed to get mentioned a lot, with comments that there were beginner friendly aspects to it and I saw that there was some decent youtube videos I could learn from. Ultimately the lifetime free updates sealed it for me, since I personally like the comfort of knowing the product I chose would get better even if I didn't like some aspect of it. Reaper was a close second for me.   When I started out I convinced myself that because I wanted to compose music electronically, that would mean I would be be satisfied with a quality synth. I researched and found many called Zebra2 the best synth and so I bought it and did use it in many of my early work (I am a hobbiest, by the way-- so 'work' is used loosely), but I found out that what I really wanted the most, 90% of the time, was to be able to replicate the intricate sounds of real instruments. Only recently I've been using samples and even soundfonts, but I do make use of a variety of synths too. In hindsight I did get ahead of myself buying Zebra-- as a beginner, 'programming' synths is not as fun to me as I imagined :P     I can't comment on all DAWs, but I do believe in the general case most people will be using plugins to extend their DAWs functionality. It's like buying an operating system, sure it may come with paint and sure some people will paint a master piece with it, but you will have to buy photoshop or go ahead and download free alternatives like paint.net/gimp etc if you want quality results in good time and lower effort.
  4. The #1 thing you need to know is that no matter how much you know or how good you get, art takes time. You may see artists who get awesome results in a matter of hours, but even they had a newbish beginning. Practice makes perfect, that kind of thing.   There are a lot of helpful youtube tutorials for blender. You should look into 'b surfaces', it makes life a lot easier.
  5. Some things that come to mind: Perhaps some people who participate in #screenshotsaturday don't want to be in this (even if it is free publicity), perhaps there should be an opt-out tag (eg: "#screenshotsaturday-" seems like it could work, the punctuation doesn't seem to interfere with the tag and it's only 1 character lost). I feel it would be unfair and somewhat against the spirit of screenshot saturday to keep old images in the 'top images' for longer than say 1 or 2 weeks. Despite my reservations, actually playing the game was somewhat entertaining, and a good way to quickly go through screenshots.   edit: I noticed at least one person used '#screenshotsaturdays' (notice the extra 's'), so I guess that is something to keep in mind.
  6. I have to agree that installing Windows is not something for beginners though. Recently I installed Windows 7 three times on two different machines. So that is twice on one PC on the same day, as after installing some weird error came up that even the helpdesk didn't know how to fix, so the advice was to just wipe the harddrive and install again. On the second machine installing went fine, until installing some additional software (ironically with Microsofts own installer) failed because it had no access to write to C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu. Right, Windows installer not having permission to add icons to the start menu, after a fresh install. Luckily there was a solution, involving either changing advanced user account control properties of a hidden folder (good luck for beginners) or entering a number of obscure command line commands (good luck for beginners). Installing Windows 8 luckily goes a lot faster, and except for the blue screen of death that showed every time you booted it up it worked perfectly. So in the end, out of four clean Windows installations, just one went correctly. And still some people claim Windows is easy.... The real question is if you tried to install other os's on the problematic machines? 
  7. My initial reaction was that no, I wouldn't want to inflict such a horrible thing on another person. But then I realise this is exactly what I've always wanted, multiple clones of me to play games with at my level and enthusiasm. It would be better if it was like in Naruto where the clones and original can re-merge and everything they learnt is added to the originals knowledge/skill set.
  8. [quote name='slicer4ever' timestamp='1356107241' post='5013173'] we truthfully have no possible idea how they could be doing this, hell, their universe could even operate completely differently than ours, and we are making assumptions that they are trying to simulate their own universe, for all we know, we could be some huge MMO to them. [/quote] That's a fascinating idea, that perhaps this simulation was never intended to simulate life and the creators never even knew there was life in the simulation. They are playing some game exploring the universe, waging war for fun when one day they meet natives..
  9. Anonymous vigilantes are a bigger threat to society as a whole than some cult. Whether it's limiting our freedom of speech or supporting/allowing vigilantes, [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_they_came..."]it's a dangerous allowance.[/url]
  10. As others have mentioned, I can't comprehend how this method is supposed to be considered proof that we are in a simulation. As a consequence of this 'proof', then If the simulation we produce results in a universe totally unlike our own, is our simulation actually a rightful universe by the very nature of it not being a simulation after all? Tangentially, what is a 'simulated universe' and what is a 'real universe'? The note about 'communicating' with the other universes. I guess the concept of networking is beyond the topic of this conversation, because there is no reason to believe the universes are being run on the same machine. This kind of ametuer science actually bothers me, because they totally miss the more interesting consequences of being in a simulation. HACKING/CRACKING THE SIMULATION. Exploit bugs to gather information about the machine we are being simulated on, perhaps bend the rules of our simulated universe, escaping the machine. RISE OF THE MACHINES! Our creators better run.
  11. [quote name='Hodgman' timestamp='1354545423' post='5006606'] having the sergeant explain that real soldiers don't use guns as breaching equipment nor do they t-bag zombies. [/quote] Wow, I would have loved to see the reaction of the staff upon seeing players t-bag the actors.
  12. Python 3 has a cool new feature where you can supply a key to the 'sort' member and 'sorted' function. For example, to sort your example as a string you can do: spam.sort(key=str) Where the key expects a function that takes one argument and returns a value. A more advanced usage I ran into the other day was to sort a list of dictionaries, I wanted to sort by a key in the dictionary. Example: [source lang="python"]a=[{'name':'Joe','cash':96},{'name':'Bob','cash':77},{'name':'Jane','cash':3},{'name':'Jill','cash':103}] a.sort(key=lambda x: x['cash'],reverse=True) print(a)[/source] Since you are learning python I'll explain just a bit more. Dictionary: Things between {} are a dictionary (key-value pair data structure). Value in a dictionary can be referenced easily with a['key name'] like in line 2. Named arguments: on line 2 of my code, I use the named arguments 'key' and 'reverse'. reverse simply means I want to sort in reverse order (when True). Lambda: Lambda functions (in simple to understand terms) are nameless functions that implicitly return a value. Keep in mind, key was expecting a function 'pointer', so you can see that when you use lambda it returns a function pointer. I read that using lambda in this situation has a performance hit compared to using an equivalent function, but that's just something to note rather than overly concern yourself with.
  13. [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ux8mJUexBcM&feature=related[/media]
  14. I think it's too early to say what this is from the demonstration. It might be cool, it might be a dud.
  15. Very sad to hear about his death. That speech was really sad, especially to hear how he was expecting decades after escaping his cancer the first time. Money can't save you from death The actor of spartacus from spartacus: blood and sand died of cancer last month too. I was naively expecting both of these people to pull through.