Jump to content
  • Advertisement

Katie

Member
  • Content count

    939
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

2256 Excellent

1 Follower

About Katie

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Personal Information

  • Role
    Writer
  • Interests
    Programming

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Katie

    Help with cryptocurrency?

    My understanding is also that capgains under the personal threshold does not need to be reported if one is not doing Self Assessment. You can write to them and tell them if you want to, but in my experience any conversation with HMRC they're not expecting just confuses them more. If you're doing SA, it needs reporting, but won't be taxed under that threshold. If you're just under the personal allowance then you won't be doing SA.
  2. Katie

    The Battlefield V "Historical Accuracy" Controversy

    "The British had some women manning AA guns however. " The women in the ATS were originally not allowed to actually fire the guns or load them -- Basically the AA defences were desperately short of workers and the only acceptable plan to allow women to work with them was that they were still prohibited from doing anything that wasn't "good". So while they were trained as spotters, reporters, radio operators, drivers and so on, they were never trained to fire the gun. It was a ridiculous distinction, but the supporters of the plan knew it was the only way it would be acceptable for the ATS to work in the air defence system. And there were casualties amongst the women -- they were in the gun emplacements and targeted by enemy aircraft along with the men -- totalling 389 killed or wounded. In recognition of this, the women were awarded AA Command uniform badges and the previously men-only title of "Bombardier". Eventually they did all the roles including gun-laying and loading except, symbolically, pulling the lanyard.
  3. Katie

    The Battlefield V "Historical Accuracy" Controversy

    Until 1950, women were banned, by actual legislation, from all military service in any of the three arms[1] -- during WW2, women served in separate, non-military services and were specifically forbidden from carrying weapons. As late as the 2010 Equality Act, the military was allowed an exclusion on a policy basis. RAF frontline service was allowed from 1989 and actually took place in 1994 (takes a while to train fighter pilots). Navy combat service was allowed from 1990 and began in 1991. Army frontline service was finally made universal in 2016. I think it's now at the point any role is open, although some of them currently have had either no women pass they physicals (most men don't either though) or none have yet completed the training. [1] The UK doesn't regard the Marines as a separate arm -- they're part of the Royal Navy.
  4. "I can not believe the original version is make with that," It's probably made with some version of the RenderWare tech based on when it was made; IIRC Criterion Derby were supplying that tech to the Guildford games development group. (The Derby group declined to hire me, but I feel better about it now knowing the office was redundanted out only 18 months later...)
  5. "I need a function that allows to extract a unique string from myCallback." Hang on -- let's explore that requirement a bit -- why do you think you need that?
  6. Yes there should be stuff around to do this. It works off the source address/port number and using those to identify which server machine to route to. (It needs to be both because of outbound natting -- the same internet IP may represent >1 client). Magic search term will include "routing" "UDP" and "sticky" or "affinity". There's going to be a timeout setting within which the packets arriving from a given IP/PORT tuple will be sent to the same target as the previous ones from that tuple.
  7. " i think it will have much better chance of finding investors." You will almost certainly not find investors to put money into a games company that has never shipped product. Angel & VC investors are looking for high-risk, high-return investments; they want a 1 in 20 chance of a 1000x reward. Games companies do not produce the growth rates required for that. Banks want a 1 in 1 chance of getting a 106% return. You can't offer that certainty. And to anyone else, your competitors are people who've left studios to set up on their own and were lead developer on titles people have heard of...
  8. Katie

    Developing an old game clone

    Well, that depends on whether you like getting legal letters/summonses and so on. Technically they get to a) write to you demanding that you stop distributing it (and if you can't things will get worse..), b) pay them for the loss of any value to their IP and c) since you knew it was their IP upfront, get punitive damages as well. They might not. But they also might. Get a lawyer.
  9. Katie

    Military Simulation Game

    You will be wanting to read "Numbers, prediction, and war: Using history to evaluate combat factors and predict the outcome of battles" by Dupuy. You'll have to find a copy at a used-book dealer because it was published in 1979. Awesome book. Controversial then and now, but still an awesomely comprehensive approach. He adopts the approach of working out what the "+X for a defensive position" type numbers ought to be, extracting data from history and then using the outputs to retroactively predict historical results and get the right answers.
  10. "Is that a realistic salary for a Java developer?" Yes. That sounds ballpark for mainstream Java dev work with that kind of background. "Also, if it is, are there any chances of earning more?" Work for a bank. Seriously. You could maybe get to 110k-120k. I've interviewed for 200k roles with hedge funds/similar, but I don't have the maths to pass them. Or in one case the solid decade of D3 they decided they needed after dragging me all the way down there... "I'm also wondering how much value the £4K-£4.5k can have in London, for my family with 2 children?" You're about to be upset... A 3bed flat in a reasonable area runs anything from 2-4k a month. Food, beer, transport -- all expensive. You're unlikely to find much to buy with a 250k mortgage ceiling. You may find you can live better in Oxford for a lower salary (don't forget that you're paying 40% + NI on any notional bump and when you get even higher the tax rate grows[1]). Also consider QoL for kids in London. The upside is that the London market is what people would call "buoyant"; which basically means you'll be sat next to empty desks that can't be filled, you'll interview candidates a lot and can walk out of the door straight into another place if anything goes wrong because everyone is hiring all the time. Once you're there, it's all a bit heady. [1] I have payslips with 59.7% deductions on them and that's pretty depressing when you're jammed into a tube at 07:00 in the freezing cold dark winter listening to someone's crappy headphones going "Tsssst, tsssst, tsssst, tsssst, tsssst, tsssst, tsssst, tsssst, tsssst, tsssst, tsssst, tsssst..." for an hour while TfL intermittently shouts "kkkkkrrrkkkk-orry kkkkkrrrrk-elay krrrrkkkkkk-ignal failure at kkkkkkrrrrrsh" over a tannoy last serviced when Napoleon was breathing.
  11. Katie

    Change career path to GameDev

    "during studies finished some simple games." That's quite an important selling point; you've got dev background and can implement games. "During my computer science studies I learned basics needed to work as software developer. After my graduation" And some education but not too much. "My C++ is average I think." And a sense of proportion[1]. If I was in the business of hiring game devs, you just made the "phone interview" stage on that basis.[2] Go meet indies like pcmaster says -- if you can find some ex-studio people see if you can talk them into some mock interviews to practice. [2] Actually you'd get the same decision here, because I am bored of seeing CVs from people with two doctorates and a fifteen year career in academia faffing about with exotic type theories but no actual industry experience of shovelling code into a project... [1] Too many people are already code gods who don't need to learn anything.
  12. Katie

    Community College or Online School?

    "I'd want to be the one calling the shots. A person who oversees the overall developments of a game and decides what gets put in and what doesn't." Well that's pretty easy. There's a few ways to do it. One is do the game yourself which is tricky if you don't like coding. So of the other options, one just needs you to have a couple of tens of millions of dollars and the other is to have written a bunch of successful games across, say, a decade.
  13. Katie

    Community College or Online School?

    What IS an "Associate's Degree" ? I don't think we have them in the UK...
  14. When I did this, admittedly a while back, I did something like pass 4 coordinate pairs in per line -- two at each end. I then used the vertex shader to spread them "out" from the line along a vector which is at right angles to the line and the eye vector (passed in as a uniform). That makes a billboard covering the line's projected position. The vertices have texture coords set up to run (0,0) -> (1,1) across the space with one axis running up/down the line and the other "across" it. The pixel shader can then use the proximity to (0.5,whatever) to put the glow in. It's performant enough to run on mobile devices without too much aggro. It's not *quite* technically right, because you're supposed to use the vector between the point and the eye (rather than just the direction the eye is pointing) which changes across the FoV, but if the FoV is relatively narrow, no-one notices. It's also a bit unstable if the lines are close to the camera, but... don't do that? For picking the lines, I cheated some more and used a transform feedback array -- the lines fill in their depth if they think their projected points are close enough to the point clicked and the CPU then just scans the array looking for the nearest close result (Grabbing a transform feedback is expensive, but if you're only doing it on clicks it's not too bad.) You could pass in the XY of the last click and have the vertex shader check the position to see if it's close before deciding whether to add glow & expand out the endpoints.
  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

Participate in the game development conversation and more when you create an account on GameDev.net!

Sign me up!